Tuesday, January 30, 2007

Target Stores Suck!



Friday, May 05, 2006

Target AP Directives for 2006


Welcome to my blog. Here you will find the Target Directives along with various other articles and documents. Feel free to copy them to file or print them out. You are encouraged to post them on other sites so that other net users might find them as you found this blog.

Minor Update:
On Feb. 1st attorney for Target Corp, Jennifer C. Adair of Duncan & Mangiafico, PC filed a six page "Memorandum in Support of Plaintiff's Motion for Extension of Time to Serve Summons and Complaint" and a 4 page "Declaration of Kerry L. Bundy in Support of Plaintiff's Request for Extension of Time to Serve Summons and Complaint".

The Court is being asked for a 45 day extension, to and including March 8, 2007, to allow them to identify and serve Mr/Mrs/Ms Doe.

& yes this site and others are constantly monitored by Target thugs looking for clues on who to serve and where to serve. Anyone who likes a good laugh can use 'Target Sucks' or variations, as a screen name on various anti-T blogs and make their life a bit harder. For some reason the T. rocket scientists think there is ONLY 1 TS, I know of at least 3 plus a site selling TS merchandise.


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Remember: Target Stores Suck

Tuesday, December 4, 2006
TARGET AP DIRECTIVES 2006

Target Security Manual - AP Directives

AP Directives
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006

PREFACE

A. Directives

Assets Protection (AP) Directives are the basic guidelines by which we conduct our business. As an AP team member, you are expected to follow the Assets Protection Directives at all times. Violation of any Directive shall be handled according to the applicable coaching and corrective action policy (see Corporate Policies - Counseling and Corrective Action).

Directives are to be followed by all team members and if you are instructed to violate a Directive you must immediately notify your supervisor. If the order involves your supervisor, notify the next level AP team member.


The Directives are in addition to, and not intended to supersede any company policies and procedures. The Directives are not contracts, expressed or implied. Following the Directives does not guarantee continued employment by Target.


NOTE: If you become involved in situations that are not covered by a Directive, you are expected to act in Target's best interests and in a manner that avoids liability.


B. Note, Caution, Warning Statements


Note, Warning and Caution statements are used within the Directives to emphasize important and critical information. AP team members must read these statements to help ensure their safety and the safety of other team members and guests.

1. Note - A Note is a statement used to notify people of information that is important, butnot hazard related.

2. Caution - A Caution indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in minor or moderate injuries.

3. Warning - A Warning indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.

C. Revision Number/Effective Dates/Highlighted Text Each directive shall be noted with a Revision Number, the Effective Date of the revision and Change bars.

1. Revision Number - Directive revisions will be sequential indicating the number and year of the revision (example: 01-2006 = the first revision in 2006, 02-2006 = the second revision in 2006, etc.).

2. Effective Date - All Directives shall include the date the revision becomes effective.

3. Highlighted Text - Highlighted text (red font) is used to indicate changes within the current revision . This allows for easier review so the user can identify areas that have been modified.



AP GENERAL POLICIES

Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006


A. Confidentiality

AP incidents and cases contain sensitive material that must be treated as confidential. In addition, all AP team members must adhere to the following rules regarding confidentiality:

1. All information regarding investigations is considered confidential and shall not be discussed with persons not involved with the investigation.

2. Information received from law enforcement is considered confidential and may not be discussed with persons not involved with the investigation.

3. Information received from background screening, drug screening, previous employers, proprietary systems, team members' files and other similar information is considered confidential and is not to be discussed with any persons not involved in the investigation.

Requests for this information by law enforcement shall be referred to the manager or District Assets Protection Leader (DAPTL)/Distribution Group Assets Protection Leader (Distribution GAPTL).

B. Information Security

AP team members are required to ensure the security of Target's confidential information by using that information appropriately and safeguarding it. All Information that Target creates, stores, transmits, or uses in conducting its business is the exclusive property of Target.

1. Computers/Laptops/PDAs/Treos - Target computers contain sensitive information and steps must be taken to ensure the protection of that information at all times.

a. Passwords - Never share passwords with other people, your password shall be used for your access only.

b. Computer Access - Ensure access to your computer is locked when leaving it unattended.

c. Do not leave laptops/PDAs and Treos in exposed areas when traveling (examples:In a car, hotel room, in checked luggage, etc.).

Target's Information Security Policy can be found online at TGT under the Company & Culture tab.


C. Knowledge of Wrongdoing

AP team members will immediately bring to the attention of the appropriate Target team member (supervisor, next level supervisor, Human Resources, Integrity Hotline, etc.) knowledge of any:

1. Theft of any Target assets.

2. Falsification of Apprehension/Recovery reports.

3. Deviation from approved apprehension procedures.

4. Failure to report a Non-Productive Incident (NPI).

5. Detrimental conduct in violation of company polices, including but not limited to:

a. Possession or use of alcohol on company property.

b. Possession or use of a controlled substance on company property.

c. Possession or use of a weapon on company property.

6. Harassment.


D. Crimes Against Property/Persons

AP members must report any crimes against person and crimes against property occurring on Target property.


NOTE: This Directive does NOT apply to merchandise vadalism cases. Loss to Target property (including merchandise) is reportable via the Property Loss Program.

1. Documentation - The following documentation shall be required following any crime against a person or property:

a. Enter all cases into Common Incident Reporting System (CIRS) within 24 hours of the incident, documenting the type of incident, parties involved and any actions taken by AP and/or Target.

b. Obtain witness statements from all team members who were witness to the incident.

c. Request copies of any police/mall security reports and retain in the case file.

d. Complete a post Serious Incident Report/NPI Follow-up Report when requested. Return one copy to HQ and retain a second copy in the case file.

2. Notification

a. Notify the DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL of all crimes against persons and any recurring crimes against property (i.e. patterns of car theft/vandalism).

b. Notify the STL in all cases of property loss. It shall be the STL's responsibility to ensure the appropriate Property Loss Reports are completed.

c. Notify the Guest Reporting Center.

d. Call Alert One (see Emergency Procedures Flip chart).

E. Minimum Age for AP Team Members


All AP team members must be at least 18 years of age at the time they are hired.


F. Conflict of Interest

Target AP team members may have full or part-time employment elsewhere, unless that employment would result in a conflict of interest as defined by Target's Business Ethics - Code of Conduct and/or any additional items listed in this section.

AP team members shall be aware of the contents of the Business Conduct Guide and the provisions of the Guide with respect to Conflict of Interest, including Target's policy on vendor gifts and other potential conflicts.

1. Existing Conflict

a. A Conflict of Interest exists when one (1) or more of the following apply:

1. An AP team member is employed by another business that competes with Target or in a security position with another retailer that involves apprehending shoplifters or dishonest team members

2. An AP team member's other employment interferes with the ability to perform essential functions of the job at Target.

3. An AP team member's other employment conflicts with scheduling or court commitments.

4. An AP team member's other employment is a paid, sworn law enforcement
position where a team member is employed by a government entity (sheriff,
deputy sheriff, peace officer, etc.) in any community (due to the nature of
the work responsibilities).

5. An AP team member's other employment is with a company with which Target does business, if interaction with Target would be required or could occur.

2. AP Team Members working in Non-AP Roles - Due to the unique responsibilities
associated with Assets Protection, AP team members are NOT permitted to work in
Non-AP positions within the same store.

NOTE: AP team members may work additional hours in a Non-AP position at an alternate store or Distribution Center (DC).


G. Court Testimony Payments

1. In some jurisdictions, AP team members may receive a fee from the court for appearing as a witness on behalf of the State, County or City for cases stemming from or related to their employment as Target team members.

2. Any witness fee checks shall be turned over to the Executive Team Leader - Assets Protection (ETL-AP) or Assets Protection Group Leader (APGL) for deposit into the appropriate account used to off-set business expenses. The DAPTL or Distribution GAPTL shall provide the ETL-AP/APGL with the appropriate account information.

3. The ETL-AP shall partner with HR regarding payroll related questions for team members and former team members testifying on behalf of Target.

H. Team Member Package/Locker Checks

Target reserves the right to monitor or inspect work areas or items that team members bring to work, like coats, purses, backpacks, bags or packages. Target also reserves the right to monitor or conduct inspections of work areas and/or personal property at any time.

This section outlines procedures for conducting team member package/locker checks.

1. Team member package/locker checks shall be conducted by an AP team member, the Leader on Duty or contracted guards (at DCs).

2. Each store/DC shall have a designated location for team members and partner business team members to secure packages while the team members are working.

3. Package checks of team members/partner business team members shall be performed at the door as the team member exits after their scheduled shift.

4. A witness (example Leader on Duty, another AP team member, etc.) must be present when conducting team member package/locker checks.

5. All vendor packages shall be checked at the service desk.

6. Team members shall not be allowed to keep any purchases or personal packages in their work area or adjacent stockroom.

7. All team members/partner business team members must have the original sales receipt in the package/shopping bag.




APPREHENSION GUIDELINES
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006

A. Purpose
This section lists the steps that MUST be followed in order for an AP team member to make a shoplifting apprehension. All steps must be observed, unless otherwise noted, and a detailed description of each step documented in the CIRS case narrative.

B. Certification
Only certified AP team members are authorized to apprehend or assist in the apprehension of shoplifters. Certification is received upon the completion of the following AP Academy courses:



1. Nonviolent Crisis Intervention R - must be completed within 30 days of hire date.

2. Position's Basic Training Courses

3. External Apprehension Certification

C. Five Steps for Apprehension
Certified AP team members must observe all five steps prior to making a shoplifter apprehension.



NOTE: If local law enforcement takes independent action and makes an apprehension before all five steps are met, the details must be documented in the CIRS report.

1. Initiation of Observation - The subject must enter the store/area without possession of Target merchandise.

2. Selection - The subject must be observed selecting Target merchandise from the display location.

3. Concealment - The subject must be observed concealing the merchandise, or the AP team member must have NO reasonable doubt based on observations that the merchandise has been concealed by the subject.

NOTE: If the merchandise is not actually concealed, it must be exposed as the subject exits or attempts to exit the store.

4. Maintain Observation - The AP team member must maintain sufficient surveillance of the subject in order to know the location of the merchandise and ensure the subject does not discard the merchandise.
NOTE: A Productive Merchandise Recovery (PMR) shall be attempted if surveillance is broken for any reason, or the AP team member can not maintain sufficient surveillance. (See PMR Directive).

-AP team member(s) must observe the subject attempt to exit the store without paying for the merchandise.

NOTE: Some jurisdictions allow variances from the exiting requirement to allow apprehensions of concealed merchandise before an individual reaches the building's exit. In these cases, the requirements must be documented and approved by the Director or Vice President of Assets Protection using the "Variance from Exiting Form" (found on the AP Zone).



SAFENESS - SUBJECT WITH A WEAPON
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose

The safety of Target team members and guests is our highest priority. Exercising appropriate caution in the process of making an apprehension is critical.

B. Subject with a Weapon

1. Weapon - A weapon is defined as any object that could potentially be used against a team member or guest. Weapons include, but are not limited to, box cutters, knives, scissors, screw drivers, hand guns, stun guns, chemical agents and clubs.

2. If a weapon is used or displayed, or if any AP team member has reason to believe a subject is in possession of a weapon during any of the five apprehension steps:

a. Back away and do not attempt to make an apprehension.

WARNING: Do not put another team member at risk by requesting the subject be "Guest Serviced".

CAUTION: If subject is observed cutting merchandise with an unknown object, treat that object as a weapon and follow steps listed in 2. above.


b. Contact law enforcement and advise:

1. Your name and title,

2. Your phone number,

3. Store location / address,

4. Description and location of the subject, and

5. Type of weapon being used by the subject.

NOTE: If law enforcement cannot respond, allow the subject to leave the store and document the subject's description,subject's vehicle description and any merchandise taken from the store, and document the case in CIRS as a Known Theft Report (KTR).

c. Return to the AP office and maintain surveillance of the subject via Closed Circuit Television (CCTV).

d. Document the case in CIRS using the steps outlined in the Documentation section:

1. If law enforcement makes an apprehension, document the case as a merchandise theft.

2. If law enforcement is not available, allow the subject to leave and document the case in CIRS as a KTR.

3. If you are confronted or threatened by a subject armed with a weapon:

a. Immediately attempt to disengage from the subject.

b. Allow the subject to exit the store.

c. If necessary, use the verbal de-escalation skills taught in Nonviolent Crisis Intervention R training.

d. Contact law enforcement, your DAPTL and Alert One

1. Any incident that results in a serious injury to a team member, guest or detained subject must be communicated to Alert One immediately and reported electronically by the LOD.

e. Document the case appropriately in CIRS (threat or assault) using the steps outlined in the Documentation section.

NOTE: Following any altercation, the AP team member(s) involved shall review the occurrence with their supervisor and the ETL-HR for safeness and procedural compliance and to determine if any further training is required.



C. Use of Weapons, Chemicals or Body Armor by a Team Member

1. Weapons - AP team members are prohibited from possessing or using any type of weapon while on company property.

a. Team members are prohibited from using any type of AP/Target equipment (radio, handcuffs, etc.) as a weapon.

b. Team members are prohibited from possessing or using saps, nightsticks, billy clubs, blue jacks or other similar devices on company property, which includes the parking lot, at any time, whether on or off duty.

2. Chemicals - AP team members are prohibited form possessing or using chemical protection devices, other than for personal protection to and from work. (Examples: Mace, pepper spray. etc.)

NOTE: All chemical protection devices must be secured in a Non-Assets Protection area during the team member's work shift.

3. Body Armor - AP team members are prohibited from wearing bulletproof vests or other body armor equipment while on duty.


NOTE: Contracted guard services working on company premises may carry defensive weapons or a firearm only as authorized by the Director/Vice President of Assets Protection.



SAFENESS - REASONABLE FORCE / PHYSICAL ALTERCATIONS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006

A. Reasonable Force


1. Reasonable Force is defined as the least amount of physical force necessary to make an apprehension, while ensuring the safety of bystanders and yourself. When making an apprehension, Reasonable Force may be used to protect AP / Target team members and guests (bystanders).

2. If an AP team member believes a subject poses a physical threat, handcuffing guidelines (outlined in the Handcuff Directive) shall be followed and law enforcement contacted immediately.



B. Physical Altercation

If an altercation occurs:

1. Immediately attempt to disengage from the subject.

2. Allow the subject to exit the store.

3. If necessary use Nonviolent Crisis Intervention R training.

4. Contact law enforcement and Alert One.

a. Any incident that results in a serious injury to a team member, guest or detained subject must be communicated to Alert One immediately and a Guest Service Report filed.

5. Communicate the incident to the Store Team Leader (STL) and/or Leader on Duty, your DAPTL and HR as soon as possible.

6. Document the case appropriately in CIRS (threat or assault) using the steps outlined in the Documentation section.



NOTE: Following any altercation, the AP team member(s) involved shall review the occurrence with their supervisor and the ETL-HR for safeness and procedural compliance and to determine if any further training is required.



SURVEILLANCE
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006

A. General Guidelines
1. Surveillance conducted by AP team members of any individual shall be based only on the actions and behaviors of the individual.

2. Surveillance shall not be based on individual characteristics such as age, gender, race, sexual orientation, disability, national origin, religion, etc.

B. Certification
Only certified AP team members are authorized to conduct physical and/or CCTV surveillance. Certification is received upon the completion of the CCTV training outlined in the AP Academy Basic Training.

C. Surveillance Equipment
Surveillance equipment is defined as any audio or video equipment that assists in the monitoring and/or recording of an individual's actions or words.

1. Surveillance equipment is the property of Target and shall ONLY be used by AP team members for approved company use. Improper use of equipment (example: using cameras to follow guests or team members for non-AP reasons) is prohibited, any AP team member caught using surveillance equipment in an inappropriate manner is subject to applicable coaching and corrective action.

2. Requests to use surveillance equipment for business purposes other than AP-related investigations must be approved by the DAPTL / Distribution GAPTL.

3. The store ETL-AP/APGL is responsible for all surveillance equipment including the proper use, location and maintenance of all equipment.

4. Video Footage - All video footage captured in by AP surveillance equipment is property of Target and shall only be used for evidentiary purposes. Any misuse, misrepresentation or manipulation of video footage by any team member is subject to applicable coaching and corrective action.



NOTE: AP surveillance is confidential and access to view the video shall only be granted to individuals with proper approval. AP team members shall partner with DAPTL (external cases) and DAPTL and HR (internal cases) prior to allowing anyone other than AP team members working on the investigation or law enforcement to view AP video.

a. Old videotapes that are no longer usable shall be destroyed by cutting the tape and removing the ribbon.

5. Public View Monitors

a. Recording of all Public View (and Exit View where applicable) monitors is required 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for digital and non-digital stores.

b. Public/Exit View images shall be retained for a minimum of 31 days for all stores.

6. Fitting Rooms / Restrooms - Target does not allow the use of surveillance equipment in or over fitting rooms or restrooms, or allow surveillance equipment to be positioned in such a way to provide the opportunity to monitor fitting rooms or restrooms.

7. Executive's / Supervisor's Office - Audio or video equipment may not be placed in or over an executive's or supervisor's office without prior approval from the Director / Vice President of Assets Protection and HR.

8. Tape Recorders - Tape recorders and other listening devices shall not be used by store based AP team members. Recorders may be used by Investigations team members, procedures are outlined in the Investigations Directives.

D. Critical vs. Non-Critical Equipment
AP surveillance equipment is divided into two categories, critical and non-critical. The ETL-AP/APGL shall be responsible for ensuring all equipment is properly maintained and repaired according to the requirements/time lines listed below:



1. Critical Equipment is defined as devices which impact safeness strategies.

a. Critical equipment includes:

1. Exterior cameras, including Pan, Tilt and Zoom (PTZ) and fixed cameras used for parking lot surveillance.

2. Entrance/exit cameras, including trucker's door, team member entrance (where applicable) and front entrance public view monitors.

3. Other public view monitors including fitting rooms, guest service and where applicable Garden Centers.

4. AP Booking room camera, Cash Office camera, Front Lane and Guest Service Desk camera.

b. Critical equipment must be repaired within 48 hours of the reported breakdown.

c. Any breakdown of critical equipment must be reported to the DAPTL immediately.

2. Non-Critical equipment is defined as all other AP surveillance equipment.

a. Non-critical equipment must be repaired within 72 hours of the reported breakdown.

3. The DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL must be notified immediately if timing for repairs of critical or non-critical equipment exceed the time limits listed above.

E. Off-site Surveillance
AP stores team members are not authorized to conduct off-site (outside of Target property) surveillance. Off-site surveillance may only be conducted by a certified Investigations team member, pursuant to Investigations Directives.




PRODUCTIVE MERCHANDISE RECOVERIES (PMRS)
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
In situations where not all five apprehension steps can be observed, and it is safe to do so, the AP team member(s) shall attempt a Productive Merchandise Recovery.


If the AP team member is able to recover the merchandise, the incident shall be documented in CIRS as a PMR - Productive Merchandise Recovery. If the AP team member is unable to recover the merchandise, the incident shall be documented in CIRS as a KTR - Known Theft Report.

WARNING: A PMR shall not be attempted if the subject is in possession, or believed to be in possession, of a weapon. In these cases the AP team member shall ensure the subject is captured on video and shall attempt to get vehicle information (make, model, license plate number) as the subject exits the store.

1. During a PMR an AP team member may:

a. Contact another non-AP team member, wearing red and khaki, to initiate guest service without reveal the reason for the request.

b. Make themselves visible to the guest as a deterrent.

c. Contact a Sales team member or research in store registers to determine if an item was purchased.

d. Ask an uniformed AP team member (TPS or ETL-AP) to stand by the exit doors to act as a deterrent.

2. During a PMR an AP team member may NOT:

a. Initiate a PMR, ask another team member to initiate a PMR or ask a non-AP team member to guest service the subject if they believe the subject is in possession of a weapon.

b. Touch an individual or anything they are carrying.

c. Ask for merchandise or make accusations of theft of merchandise.

d. Ask another team member to accuse, remove merchandise or make inappropriate gestures to the individual.

3. If the guest initiates interaction with an AP team member:

a. Verbally identify yourself as Assets Protection, but do not show identification.

b. If the guest pursues the conversation, refer the guest to store management for resolution.

4. All PMRs shall be entered into CIRS using the steps outlined in the Documentation section.




TARGET PROTECTION SPECIALIST (TPS) MERCHANDISE RECOVERIES
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006

A. Purpose
Uniformed TPS team members may conduct receipt checks and EAS responses at Target store exits when a guest is departing the store with high dollar / high theft exposed merchandise (receipt checks) or when an EAS alarm sounds as the guest exits the building.

B. During a TPS Merchandise Receipt Check
1. The Uniformed TPS may:

a. Check receipts for high dollar / high theft exposed merchandise.

2. The Uniformed TPS may NOT:

a. Check bagged items to determine whether or not something has been concealed or paid for.

b. Create an EAS Alarm in order to check the purchases or bags of a guest or team member. Creating an alarm includes but is not limited to:



1. Turning the system off and back on to cause an audible signal when a guest/team member walks through the pedestals.

2. Affixing or placing a live EAS tag onto or onto a purchase by a guest/team member.

3. An AP team member walking through a pedestal with an EAS tag at the same time a guest or team member is exiting the store.

4. Any other manipulation of the EAS system to cause an alarm.


3. Whenever possible, TPS receipt checks shall take place inside the building.


4. If a guest becomes uncooperative during a receipt check:

a. Apologize and allow the guest to leave with the merchandise.

b. Get a description of the guest and vehicle and document in the CIRS report.


NOTE: TPS Merchandise Receipts checks are only to be conducted by uniformed TPS team members. APS team members may not conduct merchandise receipt checks. If a uniformed TPS is not available, the LOD, GSTL or ETL-AP shall follow the outlined procedures; other team members are not permitted to conduct receipt checks.

C. Documenting TPS Merchandise Recoveries
The following procedures shall be followed by the TPS when documenting any TPS recovery or attempted TPS recovery.



1. Each TPS Recovery must be documented in CIRS.

a. Cases shall be identified as "Other" / "TPS Merch Recovery".

b. Note the time, date and location of the recovery (example: 11:03 am, November 27, Green exit).

c. List all merchandise recovered.

d. Do not add multiple recoveries to the same report; each TPS recovery shall be entered as a single incident with a unique CIRS case number.



NOTE: CIRS reports may be called upon if a case goes to criminal or civil trial and therefore are incident specific and shall only contain a single incident.

D. EAS Alarm Response
If an EAS alarm sounds, the uniformed TPS shall follow the procedures outlined below. If a uniformed TPS is not available, the LOD, GSTL or ETL-AP shall follow the outlined procedures; other team members are not permitted to respond to EAS alarms.



1. Guests with visible purchases:

a. Approach guest and conduct merchandise receipt check to verify purchases and deactivation of EAS tags.

1. If you find the item on the receipt, deactivate the item and allow the guest to leave.

2. If the item is not on the receipt, ask the guest if they would like to purchase the item.

3. If the guest does not have, or cannot find a receipt, ask the guest which cashier rang up their purchase and verify with the cashier. If the purchase cannot be verified, contact another AP team member for assistance.

4. Searches of a subject's personal possessions (example: purse) for evidence (merchandise) is not allowed unless the subject initiates the search or requests an AP team member to inspect their possessions.



NOTE: If the guest becomes uncooperative, allow the guest to leave. Obtain a description of the guest and guest's vehicle and enter it in CIRS.



2. Guest with NO visible purchases:



a. Approach guest and conduct merchandise receipt check to verify purchases and deactivation of EAS tags.

1. If the guest does not have any purchases, ask if they have an electronic key - if so ask to see it.

2. Ask if guest has merchandise from another store - if so ask if they would like it deactivated.

3. If the guest does not have merchandise or an electronic key, allow them to leave the store.

4. If guest shows you Target merchandise that has not been paid for, ask if they would like to purchase the merchandise and allow them to purchase the item(s). If the guest refuses to purchase the item, ask for the merchandise back.

5. Searches of a subject's personal possessions (example: purse) for evidence (merchandise) is not allowed unless the subject initiates the search or requests an AP team member to inspect their possessions.



NOTE: If the guest becomes uncooperative, allow the guest to leave. Obtain a description of the guest and guest's vehicle and enter it in CIRS.




APPREHENSIONS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
This section covers directives outlining the different types of external apprehensions and the AP team member requirements for each type.

B. Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Apprehensions
Certified AP team members may make shoplifting apprehensions utilizing CCTV provided each of the following guidelines are followed:



1. The five steps for apprehension have been observed and can be documented by an AP team member.

2. The incident, or any portion of the incident is captured/recorded using non-time lapsed Target CCTV with sufficient surveillance maintained by AP team member(s) to observe the five steps.

NOTE: When two or more AP team members are involved, one team member shall maintain camera surveillance while the second team member makes the apprehension on the floor. If only one AP team member is on duty and is required to discontinue camera surveillance and go to the selling floor, the AP team member can not make the apprehension because sufficient surveillance will have been lost. If appropriate, attempt a PMR.

3. All documentation steps shall be followed to preserve evidence, including retention of all applicable video.

C. Service Desk Apprehensions
Shoplifter apprehensions involving Service Desk transactions shall only be made in the following circumstances.



1. All five apprehension steps have been observed by AP team member.

2. If the subject interacts with the Service Desk, the interaction has nothing to do with the shoplifting apprehension. (Example: After the first four apprehension steps are observed, the subject approaches the Service Desk to ask a team member a question, not related to the shoplifted merchandise. Then the subject attempts to leave the store with the merchandise. AP team member apprehends as subject exits the store.)

3. Single incidents where the DAPTL is contacted for approval prior to making the apprehension. In these cases the following steps must be clearly documented in the CIRS report, in addition to standard requirements:

a. The AP team member must have public view video clearly showing the subject entering the store WITHOUT the merchandise and later approaching the Service Desk with the merchandise.

b. The time and date the DAPTL was contacted for approval.

c. All video footage of the incident including entry of store, selection and apprehension. All video must be retained with case file.

4. Incidents where a person or group of individuals have known theft activity in an area and where the DAPTL

has given prior permission to a SPECIFIC AP team member to make an apprehension. The incident must be documented as follows:

a. The AP team member must have public view video clearly showing the subject entering the store WITHOUT the merchandise and later approaching the Service Desk with the merchandise.

b. The time and date the DAPTL was contacted for approval.

c. All video footage of the incident including entry of store, selection and apprehension. All video must be retained with case file.



NOTE: Under NO circumstances are AP team members allowed to contact Service Desk team members in order to influence the outcome of a transaction.

D. Restroom / Fitting Room Apprehensions
AP team members are not allowed to conduct surveillance or make apprehensions in restroom and/or fitting rooms.

1. AP team members are not allowed to follow subject's into a restroom or fitting room to conduct surveillance.

2. AP team members shall not ask another team member to enter a fitting room or restroom to conduct surveillance.


E. Transactional Fraud Apprehensions

Transactional fraud is defined as "using transactional documents dishonestly to cause a loss to Target". Transactional documents include; checks, credit cards, gift cards, merchandise vouchers and coupons.

Certified AP team members may make Transactional Fraud apprehensions only when ALL of the following conditions are met:

1. The AP team member has completed required training listed below:

a. Position's Basic Training Courses,

b. External Apprehension Certification and

c. Transactional Fraud Apprehension Training.



2. The AP team member has verified the transactional fraud.
3. The AP team member has pre-approval to make the transactional fraud apprehension from their Group Assets Protection Team Leader (GAPTL), DAPTL or Assets Protection Investigations Team Leader.
4. The pre-approval must include specific guidelines under which the apprehension shall be made, for example; the subject's name, description and or account number, verification of the fraud from the account holder or bank or institution issues the transactional document.

NOTE: If the AP team member does not have pre-approval but observes behaviors that indicate an individual may be engaging in transactional fraud, the AP team member must contact one of the partners listed in 3. above and give details of the transaction in order to obtain approval prior to attempting apprehension.

F. Vendor/Partner Business Team Member Apprehensions
1. A Vendor team member is defined as: "A person who delivers a product or provides a service to Target. Vendor team members typically do not wear Red and Khaki. Vendor team members do not receive Point of Sale (POS) training or have access to the POS system." These cases are coded in CIRS as "External" cases. (Examples of Vendor team members: product representatives such as Coke or Pepsi, etc.)

2. A Partner Business team member is defined as a person who works within the four walls of a Target store/DC, but is not employed by Target. These cases are coded in CIRS as "Internal" cases. (Examples of Partner Business Team Members: Optical team members, team members working in Life Touch Studios, Minute Clinic team members, janitorial service team members, etc.)


AP team members are responsible for knowing which Partner Business team members conduct business in their buildings. When investigating a Partner Business team member, it is important to determine who employs an individual and whether Target assets, the Partner Business assets or both are involved. If there is any doubt regarding who employees an individual, contact Human Resources.


3. Vendor/Partner Business team member apprehensions shall be made using the following guidelines:

a. When the five steps for apprehension have been met:

1. The matter shall be handled like an external shoplifting incident.

2. If the vendor/partner business team member is working at a Target store/DC during non-business hours the vendor team member

may be apprehended as they are exiting the store/DC at the end of their work shift.

3. The DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL shall be advised that a vendor/partner business apprehension has occurred.

b. In cases where the five steps for apprehension have not been met:

1. The DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL shall be contacted to discuss the extent of the investigation and determine the appropriate course of action.

2. The DAPT/Distribution GAPTL will decide whether or not the vendor/partner business team member shall be interviewed to determine the scope of the theft.

NOTE: All interviews of vendor/partner business team members shall be conducted by the ETL-AP/APGL or DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL.

4. Contacting the vendor/partner business team member's employer:

a. All contact with employer of the vendor/partner business team member shall be handled or coordinated by the DAPTL/APGL.

b. The DAPTL/APGL may contact the vendor/partner business company to inform them of the team member apprehension.

c. The DAPTL/APGL will inform the vendor/partner business that the apprehended team member is no longer permitted to provide service to ANY Target store/DC.

NOTE: Target will not request the vendor/partner business terminate any apprehended team member; the call is to only to inform the vendor/partner business that the particular team member is not allowed to return to provide service at a Target store/DC.

NOTE:Target will not participate in any decision by the Partner Business regarding the apprehended team member's employment.

5. When investigating a cash loss, partner with your Centralized Sales Auditor for assistance with recovery opportunities.




HANDCUFF USE
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
AP team members who have successfully completed the Handcuff training shall be provided handcuffs to be used during an apprehension when a subject becomes violent or a danger to others.

B. Handcuff Use
1. AP team members may not carry or use handcuffs unless they have successfully completed the approved Target AP handcuff training program.

2. Handcuffs shall only be used in the following situations:

a. The subject being apprehended becomes violent,

b. The subject attempts to break away from the custody of the AP team member, or

c. There is reason to believe the subject may become violent or may pose a risk to the safety of AP team members, other Target team members or guests.



3. Handcuffs shall not be applied until the AP team member(s) is able to maintain reasonable control of the subject. If the AP team member(s) can not maintain control of the subject while handcuffing, the team member shall abort the apprehension.

4. The subject's hands shall only be handcuffed behind them, and the handcuffs shall be double locked.

5. A subject shall not be handcuffed to another person or to any object (chair, car, etc.), except for handcuff bars in AP offices that are equipped with them.

6. A handcuffed subject shall never be left unattended.

7. Once a subject is handcuffed, the handcuffs shall only be removed in the presence of a law enforcement officer.

8. Handcuffs and handcuff keys are the property of Target and shall not be taken home by team members.




NON-PRODUCTIVE INCIDENTS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
A Non-Productive Incident (NPI) is defined as an apprehension that is initiated where no Target merchandise is recovered. This section outlines the steps that must be followed after any NPI.

B. NPIs Involving an Adult
The following outlines the steps that must be taken by AP team members after a NPI occurs:

1. Release the guest - Once it is determined that a guest suspected of shoplifting does not have merchandise, the guest must be released immediately. The AP team member(s) involved shall apologize to the guest for any inconvenience, and allow the guest to leave the store. If the guest requests to speak to a manager, refer the guest to the Leader on Duty (LOD).

2. Contact the DAPTL to inform that a NPI has occurred in the store.

3. Document the incident in CIRS as a NPI - Non-Productive Incident.

4. AP team member(s) involved must write out a chronological list of events identifying:

a. The five steps of apprehension observed (as applicable).

b. An attempt to identify where the subject may have discarded the merchandise and, if merchandise can be located, investigate how the AP team member did not observe the discard.

5. Partner with the ETL-AP/DAPTL and ETL-HR on corrective action.'

6. Retain ALL video of the event as outlined in "Documentation Steps"



NOTE: Video of NPIs shall be retained with case files for a period of 7 years.

C. NPIs Involving a Juvenile
In cases involving a juvenile, all steps in B. above shall be followed. In addition, AP team members shall use good judgement when releasing a juvenile to ensure they may safely leave the premises (example: not allowing a juvenile to leave the store unescorted if the apprehension took place during daylight hours and it has since become dark). In these cases, the AP team member may choose to contact the juvenile's parent or another responsible party.




SEARCHES OF PERSONS, PRIVATE RESIDENCES OR MOTOR VEHICLES
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Searches of Persons
1. AP team members are not allowed to conduct physical searches of subjects. Physical searches may only be conducted by law enforcement.

2. Searches of a subject's personal possessions (example: purse) for evidence (merchandise) is not allowed unless the subject initiates the search or requests an AP team member to inspect their possessions. CIRS narrative must be documented to indicate subject requested possessions to be searched by AP team member.

B. Searches of Private Residence or Motor Vehicles
1. AP team members will NOT participate in a search of a private residence or motor vehicle.

2. At the request of law enforcement, AP team members may provide assistance in identifying company merchandise.

a. GAPTL approval is required prior to AP team members assisting in any search assistance as outlined in B. 2. above.

b. If the assistance criteria listed above is met, the role of the AP team member is to only answer questions and/or verify Target merchandise.

PURSUIT OF SHOPLIFTERS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
Shoplifter apprehensions are to be handled in a professional manner and as discreetly as possible. Safety of guests and team members always comes first.

1. Fleeing Shoplifter

a. If a shoplifter attempts to flee after being confronted, do not give chase in any manner (running, driving, etc.).

b. Store based AP team members shall not use any vehicle to follow or pursue a subject for any reason.

c. AP team members shall not encourage, condone, suggest or ask another Target team member or anyone else to chase a fleeing shoplifter.

2. Documentation

a. If a shoplifter flees, the AP team member shall document the incident in CIRS as a Known Theft Report using the steps outlined in the Documentation section of this manual.



LAW ENFORCEMENT REFERRAL GUIDELINES
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. General Referral Guidelines
1. The ETL-AP shall be responsible for partnering with local law enforcement / prosecutors office annually to determine the prosecution requirements for their jurisdiction and must have a completed Prosecutor's Questionnaire on file in the Assets Protection office. The Prosecutor's Questionnaire shall be updated annually to ensure the most current practices are being followed and a copy of the Questionnaire shall be kept in the local AP Office.

2. AP shall refer for prosecution all individuals apprehended for retail theft when the value of the merchandise is $20.00 or greater and the case meets local prosecution requirements.

NOTE: If a case meets/exceeds the $20.00 referral guideline, but is NOT referred, the reason for non-referral must be included in the CIRS narrative. (Example: Local jurisdiction limits require merchandise in excess of $75.00 in order for prosecution.)

3. A team member witness, of the same gender of the suspected shoplifter , must be present in the room at all times during the detention.

B. Juvenile Referral Guidelines
A juvenile is typically defined as an individual who is under the age of eighteen (18).



1. Juveniles apprehended for retail theft shall be referred for prosecution under the same guidelines as adults.

2. In addition to guidelines listed in A. above, the following referral procedures also apply to juvenile cases:

a. When a juvenile is referred for prosecution, a parent/guardian or responsible adult party shall be notified of the incident after responding authorities have arrived and taken custody of the juvenile.

b. AP team members shall make at least two (2) attempts to contact the parent or responsible party. If the juvenile's parent/guardian cannot be contacted, the juvenile shall be turned over to the police. The CIRS report shall be noted with the time/date of attempted contact, phone number(s) called, and to whom the juvenile was released.

c. If law enforcement does not respond to requests for assistance, contact your DAPTL for guidance.

d. Apprehended juveniles shall not be photographed, unless required by local jurisdiction.



NOTE: Any juvenile NOT referred to authorities must have a parent/guardian or responsible adult party contacted immediately. If the parent or responsible party cannot be contacted within one half-hour (30 minutes) and after three attempts to reach them, contact law enforcement and release the juvenile to them. Document the number of attempted contacts, contact number and to whom the juvenile was released in the CIRS narrative.



C. Team Member Referral Guidelines

In addition to the General Referral Guidelines listed in A. above, the following guidelines apply to team members apprehended for shoplifting:

1. AP team members will refer for prosecution and seek restitution for loss from all team members apprehended for committing crimes that involve Target, a Partner Business or Vendor when the case meets local prosecution requirements.

2. Recommendations to refer for prosecution shall be made by the ETL-AP/APGL. The ETL-AP/APGL will also consult with HR regarding the recommendation to refer for prosecution to determine if there are any mitigating circumstances to be considered regarding the referral.

3. The DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL must approve the recommendation to refer a team member for prosecution. The DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL approval must be documented in the HR cover letter as follows:

a. "Approved for referral",

b. Date DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL approved referral, and

c. DAPTL's/Distribution GAPTL's signature.



4. The decision to terminate a team member for shoplifting shall only be made by the appropriate HR team member.



NOTE: AP Director / Vice President approval shall be required for situations where Target has filed a police report and later requests to dismiss the criminal charges filed against the team member. Specific details shall be communicated through the GAPTL.


PHOTOGRAPHING OF APPREHENDED SHOPLIFTERS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Photographing Shoplifters
1. Adult shoplifters - AP shall photograph all adult shoplifters unless prohibited by local statutes or ordinances.

2. Team Member Shoplifters - AP will not photograph any team member apprehended for shoplifting during working or non-working hours.

3. Juvenile Shoplifters - AP will not photograph any juveniles apprehended for shoplifting, unless required by local statutes or ordinances.

B. Photograph Retention
1. All photographs shall be retained in the case file.

2. Under no circumstances will any photograph of an apprehended shoplifter be displayed in open view, on any office wall or in any other manner, or removed from Target property for personal use.




TRESPASS NOTICE
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
Trespass statutes define what constitutes a trespass. State laws generally provide that remaining on private property without permission is trespassing. An individual is usually trespassing when refusing to leave our store/DC after we have asked them to leave, either orally or by trespass notice.

B. Situations Warranting a Trespass Notice
Trespass notices require the approval from the ETL-AP/APGTL or higher. The use of a trespass notice is appropriate in the following situations:

1. When a subject has been apprehended at any Target location on more than one occasion.

2. When a person apprehended is in possession of a weapon.

a. Follow procedures outline in Safeness Weapons Directive.

b. If a weapon is discovered while the subject is detained, the AP team member shall ensure the safety of all team members and guests first, and if possible, remove and secure the weapon and handcuff the subject. The AP team member shall then contact law enforcement to advise of situation involving a weapon.

CAUTION: If the subject produces a weapon in a threatening manner at any time, the AP team member(s) shall disengage and allow the subject to exit the store/DC. The AP team member shall attempt to get a description of the sub-ject's vehicle, so long as doing it does not put anyone in danger, and enter descriptions of both the subject and the subject's vehicle into the CIRS report.

3. When the person apprehended has vandalized property or merchandise.

4. Persons who exhibit lewd or lascivious behavior.

NOTE: If the AP team member(s) feel a trespass notice is warranted, but the incident does not meet the criteria listed above, the team member will partner with their DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL for approval prior to issuing the notice.

C. Issuing a Trespass Notice
1. Location - A trespass Notice shall apply only to the location where the subject was apprehended or the incident took place.

NOTE: A Trespass Notice can be issued for multiple locations with DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL approval. The Trespass Notice must indicate the specific store/DC locations and a specific reason for the multiple locations. The AP team member involved must document the CIRS report to indicate DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL approval and Trespass Notice locations.

2. All Trespass Notices must contain the following elements:

a. The date and time the notice was issued.

b. Name of the person to who the notice is being issued.

c. District or Region of the Target store/DC issuing the Trespass Notice

d. The specific store (or stores with DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL approval) from which the subject is being trespassed.



NOTE: AP team members are NOT authorized to ban subjects from all Target stores/DCs, or ban subjects for life. All multiple location notices must be approved by the DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL prior to issuing.



3. The completed Trespass notice shall be given to the apprehended subject and a copy of the notice retained in the case file.

4. Document the CIRS report to indicate a Trespass Notice was issued.

NOTE: A copy of a blank Trespass Notice can be found on the AP Zone, under the Forms-All tab.

D. Violation of a Trespass Notice
If an individual who has been issued a Trespass Notice violates the notice and returns to the store/DC, ask the individual to leave the property. If the individual refuses to leave, contact law enforcement for assistance and document the incident in CIRS.

E. Team Member Trespass Notices
In situations that warrant the issuance of a Trespass Notice to a team member or former team member, the following shall apply:

1. Immediately contact your DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL to inform them of the situation prior to issuing the Trespass Notice.

2. The DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL will partner with the appropriate Employee Relations / Human Resources contacts at the Regional or Headquarters level


ACCOMPLICES
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Shoplifter Accomplices
1. Target defines a shoplifter accomplice as:

a. A person who assists another in a crime of retail theft, but is not leaving the store with merchandise.

b. Someone for whom only some of the five apprehension steps have been observed.

2. AP team members may detain all active participants in a shoplifting incident only when all five apprehension steps have been observed for each participant.

3. Since a shoplifter accomplice only participated in some of the five apprehension steps they will not be detained, questioned or referred to authorities for prosecution.

NOTE: If local law enforcement takes independent action and makes an apprehension before all five steps are met, the details must be documented in the CIRS report.

B. Box Stuffing Accomplice
Box stuffing is defined as "When a person puts merchandise inside a box or in packaging of another product, he/she pays for what product should be in the box, but not the correct merchandise."

1. AP team members may apprehend a box stuffing accomplice if:

a. The accomplice is leaving with merchandise

AND

b. The AP team member has no reasonable doubt the accomplice knows the box contains concealed merchandise (example: AP team member witnessed accomplice holding box while second subject stuffed merchandise inside, then accomplice attempted to exit with box.).

c. The case must be documented in CIRS indicating the steps observed to merit the accomplice apprehension.


C. Team Member Accomplice


1. Target defines a team member accomplice as an individual who is not a Target team member and participates in an under ringing or passing merchandise with a Target team member. A team member accomplice may be a guest, Partner Business team member or a Vendor team member.

2. Apprehension - A team member accomplice may be apprehended when probable cause exists to believe the individual is actively participating in the crime, based on the following criteria:
a. An AP team member observes the individual select the merchandise and bring it to a cashier lane.

b. The individual makes the purchase with either a check or cash, thus verifying the individual knew the amount of the purchase.

NOTE: Apprehensions of team member accomplices shall not be made on credit card purchases.

c. The items purchased have been line item voided, zero transactions total or passed outright.

d. The under ringing or merchandise passing must result in a significant difference in the purchase price to support the inference that the subject and accomplice were knowingly participating in a crime. (Example: Purchasing a DVD player for $2.50 can indicate the guest was participating in an under ringing crime.)

e. The incident must be captured on conventional or digital CCTV.

3. Apprehension Procedures
a. Apprehend the individual as they leave the store and process as an external shoplifting case.

b. Contact law enforcement immediately.

NOTE: The subject shall be apprehended only if the AP team member has enough evidence to contact law enforcement immediately and prove that the individual was involved in a crime. Do not wait to contact law enforcement while the team member is being interviewed.

c. In cash cases refund the purchase with cash.

d. In check cases, write "VOID" across the front of the check and retain the original check as evidence.

e. Retain original receipts/refund slips.


4. When the case does not meet the procedures listed in 2 & 3 above:

a. Approach the individual and identify yourself as a Target team member.

b. Politely explain to the individual that the purchase was charged at an incorrect amount.

c. If the purchase was an underring, ask the individual to re-purchase and identical item at the correct price. Obtain the duplicate item(s) for the individual and hold the original item(s) as evidence.

d. If the individual does not wish to re-purchase the item(s), refund the purchase.

e. Retain merchandise as evidence or photograph merchandise as jurisdiction allows.

f. If the individual refuses to cooperate and insists on leaving with the merchandise, allow the individual to do so. Indicate the subject and vehicle description in the CIRS report.

g. After receiving HR approval, an interview may be conducted with the team member. (See Team Member Interviews)


5. Document the case appropriately in CIRS using the steps outlined in the Documentation section.


EVIDENCE
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
Any property related to an Assets Protection case, whether Target property, non-Target property or contraband shall be treated as evidence and protected, preserved and documented as outlined in this section.

B. Evidence Documentation
1. Evidence Log - All stores/DCs must maintain an evidence log and the log shall be updated each time a piece of evidence is placed in or removed from the evidence locker. The evidence log shall contain:

a. Date and time of entry or removal of evidence,

b. The name of the team member entering or removing the evidence,

c. The reason for entry/removal of evidence, and

d. CIRS case number related to the evidence.


2. Evidence Locker - Each store shall maintain a designated evidence locker or similar lockable area for evidence retention.

3. Evidence Tag - An evidence tag must be affixed to all items obtained in the apprehension of a subject. At a minimum all evidence tags must contain:

a. AP team member's name and initials,

b. The CIRS case number, and

c. Date of apprehension

C. Photographing Evidence
All evidence shall be photographed and the photographs properly labeled as evidence. Merchandise shall only be kept as evidence if local jurisdiction requires, any jurisdictions allow certain forms of evidence to be photographed as a method of preservation. The ETL-AP/APGL shall be responsible for partnering with local law enforcement to understand the local jurisdiction guidelines.


1. When photographing merchandise, follow these steps:

a. Take a full shot of the item, accurately depicting the color, features and any other identifying aspects of the item.

b. Take a close up photo(s) of the item depicting the price tag, labels and/or any damage to the item.

c. Label all photographs with the date, time, name of subject and CIRS case number.

d. Retain all photographs in the case file.



2. After photographing, return the merchandise to the owning department, unless local jurisdiction requires merchandise be held, in which case merchandise shall be stored in evidence locker.



D. Company Property



All recovered merchandise, any item the subject may have removed from the merchandise and discarded (packaging, price tags, vendor tags, defeated merchandise protection tags, boxes, etc.), company documents (including but not limited to POS receipts, vouchers, gift cards. gift receipts, refund documents, etc.), and recovered cash shall be treated as evidence.

1. When logging company property as evidence, the following applies:

a. Original documents are preferred; if law enforcement requires an original document, make a copy for evidentiary purposes.

b. If photocopies are used, document the location of the original document in the CIRS report (example: Original receipt retained by Minneapolis Police Officer John Smith).

c. All company documents shall be initialed and dated by an AP team member (in small writing in the corner of the document).

d. Record each item of recovered property in the "Evidence" section of the CIRS report.

e. Complete an evidence tag for any item retained by law enforcement or Assets Protection and affix to piece of evidence.

f. Log all items on the Evidence Log.


E. Non-Company Property

All Non-Company Property (evidence) recovered from a subject shall be recorded in the same manner as Company Property using the steps listed in D. above.

F. Contraband
Contraband is defined as items or goods that are illegal to possess, such as weapons, narcotics, drug paraphernalia, etc.

1. All contraband discovered by AP team members shall be recorded in the "Evidence" section of the CIRS report, marked with an Evidence Tag and turned over to law enforcement.

2. AP team members are forbidden from retaining/possessing contraband.

G. Preserving Evidence
Following an apprehension, preserve all evidence in the following manner: 1. Affix an Evidence Tag to all merchandise, non-company property and contraband recovered during the apprehension.

2. Prior to turning over any evidence to law enforcement, ensure the evidence is properly tagged and that a law enforcement officer signs for each item using their name, initials and date on the Evidence Log.

3. Store all physical evidence (merchandise, company documents, tags, etc.) in a bag or container and seal the bag/container to protect the item(s) from tampering.

4. Attach the evidence property tag to the sealed container.

5. If AP will be retaining the evidence, place the sealed bag or container in the evidence locker or similar lockable area in the AP office.


AP INCIDENT DOCUMENTATION
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
All incidents must be properly documented by an AP team member in the Common Incident Reporting System (CIRS). All on-going investigations shall be documented in the Common Investigations Management System (CIMS); when the investigation escalates into an incident, the case information shall be moved to the CIRS system.



A case file shall also be completed for each incident and copies of the case file shall be retained in the store/DC for a period of seven (7) years and a copy of all Internal casesshall be given to the ETL-HR.

B. CIRS/CIMS Documentation
1. CIRS and CIMS files are considered part of the investigative process and may be subject to subpoena and disclosure if a case goes to trial. Cases shall be documented in a complete and professional manner.

2. Narrative - The case narrative shall be written in a clear concise format and shall include at minimum the following:

a. Five steps of apprehension - Provide a detailed, chronological order of each of the five steps, and where and when they took place. If a step is missed, and a Productive Merchandise Recovery (PMR) takes place, identify the missing step(s) and reason in the narrative. (Example - PMR conducted because APS lost sight of subject on sales floor and was unable to maintain surveillance.)

b. Detailed description of why subject was observed. (Example: "Subject entered building wearing a large winter coat and the temperature outside was 89oF," not "Suspicious suspect entered the building".)

c. Names of team member(s) involved - List the names of all team members and their roles within the apprehension.

d. Law Enforcement - If law enforcement is involved in an apprehension or if the subject is referred to law enforcement detail the role law enforcement played in the stop. Also, note this information in the law enforcement section of the CIRS report.

NOTE: Narrative shall be noted if law enforcement decides to make the apprehension, such as when AP has not observed all five steps of apprehension. In these cases AP team members may assist law enforcement.

e. Weapons - Indicate if a weapon is present at any time during any incident. Also indicate if the weapon was used during the incident (i.e. Razor blade used to cut open DVD package).

f. Handcuffs - If a subject is handcuffed, indicate who handcuffed the subject and why the handcuffs were applied (reference Handcuff Directive).

g. Detailed description of apprehension location - Specifically identify the location where the apprehension took place, (E.g. "Green Main Exit" not "Exit").

h. Surveillance of the incident - Note whether CCTV, physical surveillance or both were used to observe the incident.

i. Other cases/information - Reference other CIRS/CIMS cases that led to initial observation of the subject or supporting evidence to the apprehension. Also, if AP team member was tipped by another team member or guest, and witness statements gathered after apprehension.


3. Narratives are to be treated as evidence and shall NOT contain the following::

a. Subject description (race, gender, sex, age, etc.) - The CIRS report has a section that asks for subject description and any information shall be documented here. The narrative shall NOT contain this information; it shall contain only the facts leading up to the apprehension/incident.

b. Slang terms, jargon or acronyms - Narratives may be used as evidence during criminal/civil cases. Therefore, all jargon and slang terms shall be avoided and all acronyms spelled out (i.e. Assets Protection Booking Room instead of AP Booking Room).

c. Generalizations- The narrative is a factual description of what took place, and shall not contain any opinions of the team members, generalizations about the subject or assumptions of what they may have done or intended to do.

d. Multiple cases/incidents - An individual CIRS case must be completed for each incident; cases occurring on the same shift are not to be grouped together into a single incident.

C. Case File -
A case file must be created for all apprehensions/incidents within a store/DC. The AP team member involved shall be responsible for ensuring all evidence is collected and filed properly. At a minimum the case file must contain the following:


1. A copy of the CIRS narrative and any other related CIRS/CIMS cases.

2. Photos - Any photos taken of the subject/evidence shall be kept with the case file. Photos must be labeled with the case number and date.

3. Video - Copies of video relating to AP cases/apprehension shall be retained for a period of 7 years.

a. Video shall include observation of the five apprehension steps.

NOTE: If a step is not captured on video, the CIRS report must be updated indicating why the particular step was missed. (Example: Limited camera coverage in automotive section did not allow for constant video surveillance.)

b. Video shall be transferred to a VHS or DVD/CD and properly labeled with the date and case number.

c. All other video shall be retained for a minimum of 30 days.

NOTE: Video must be retained for all AP incidents/apprehensions and kept with the case files for a period of seven (7) years. All other video shall be retained for a minimum of 30 days unless otherwise noted.

NOTE: If video is copied to a VCR tape, ensure the tab has been removed to prevent over-taping.

NOTE: If law enforcement requests a copy of the videotape, make a copy and retain the original. Original recordings shall be provided to law enforcement upon the receipt of a subpoena; in such cases ensure the store/DC retains a copy prior to turning over the original. If law enforcement insists on taking custody of the original without a subpoena, provide the original but ensure a copy is retained. Ensure your DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL is notified any time law enforcement requires a copy of evidence.



4. Witness statements - All team members involved shall be required to give a witness statement of the incident and these statements shall be retained in the case file. Any other statements gathered by AP team members shall be properly labeled (case number and date) and filed in the case file.

5. A copy of the Trespass Notice (if applicable).

NOTE: In the event of a serious incident (assaults with serious injury, death, sexual assaults, armed robbery) or any other incident receiving media attention, the ETL-AP/APGL shall partner with the DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL for further guidance regarding the scope of additional evidence to be retained in the case file.


AUTHORITY TO APPROVE CIRS CASES
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
This section outlines the authority and requirements for CIRS case approval.

B. Approval
1. AP team members are not permitted to approve cases they have initiated and entered into the CIRS reporting system.

2. All cases shall be approved by the next level AP supervisor (or higher).

3. Prior to CIRS case approval, the approver shall review the case for:

a. Complete and accurate narrative, including details of the case outlining the five apprehension steps, a chronological sequence of events from subject entering store/DC to apprehension/exit, proper spelling and limited use of acronyms.

b. Proper documentation of the case, including team members involved, law enforcement involvement, any weapons used/found, whether a subject was handcuffed, location where the incident took place, date and time of incident, etc.

c. Directive compliance.

d. Complete case file including any photos, witness statements, accompanying video, etc.

e. Ensure the case is properly coded.

NOTE: Cases not meeting above minimum standards shall be sent back for re-work. The supervisor shall work with AP team member initiating the case to ensure complete and accurate details and coach team member on deficient case details.

4. Supervisors shall review cases for approval on a daily basis.

5. Cases shall be approved or returned for re-work within 48 hours of submission.

NOTE: Details used in CIRS are considered evidence and may be called upon if a case is brought to trial. It is vital that team members complete the narrative in a timely fashion with the facts of the case. The report is designed to capture the sequence of events and must be a factual list of events. Team members must refrain from adding opinions or assumptions when documenting the case.


TICKET FRAUD
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
Ticket Fraud is defined as "Changing the price on merchandise with the intent of purchasing the merchandise at a reduced price."

B. Ticket Fraud Apprehension
1. An Apprehension shall only be permitted when ALL of the following criteria have been met:

a. Written confirmation has been received that your local jurisdiction will prosecute Ticket Fraud referrals and this confirmation is on file in the store and with the DAPTL.

b. The person or group involved has known theft or Ticket Fraud activity and the known activity is documented in a CIRS narrative.

c. The AP team member has pre-approval to make the Ticket Fraud apprehension from their GAPTL, DAPTL or Investigations Team Leader.

d. All elements of the Ticket Fraud have been observed:

1. Selection of the item.
2. Placement of the new ticket on the item.

3. Purchase of the item at the incorrect price.

e. If selection, removal and placement have been observed, but an apprehension cannot be made due to other criteria not being met:


1. Handle the incident by asking the cashier to request that the price be

checked. The cashier can then inform the guest of the correct price.
2. Partner with your DAPTL or Investigations Team Leader.

3. Gather all evidence and document the incident in CIRS using the "Ticket

Fraud" classification.


FOOD CONSUMPTION / FOOD PASSING INVESTIGATIONS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
This Directive applies to all areas of food sales (Food Avenue, Starbucks, etc.) as well as any other food items available for sale in Target stores. It also applies to single or multiple incidents of food consumption or passing.

B. Handling
1. Incidents of team member food consumption and food passing shall be treated as a policy violation and referred to Human Resources for further handling. AP will NOT conduct an interview or refer for prosecution these types of incidents, however they may assist HR by providing information and supporting documentation.

2. Investigations that reveal cash theft or theft in bulk (example: a case of pop) shall be handled by AP as a theft (internal or external). AP must observe the five steps prior to apprehension.


TEAM MEMBER DISCOUNT VIOLATION INVESTIGATIONS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
This Directive outlines the procedures for an investigation of a team member suspected of a violating Target's Team Member Discount policy.

B. Investigation/Apprehension Steps
1. AP shall notify HR as soon as they become aware of a discount policy violation.

2. AP shall conduct an investigation to establish the scope of the team member's violation.

3. If the investigation reveals other possible dishonest activity, AP shall open a team member investigation and document the investigation in CIMS.

4. If no additional information of other possible dishonest activity exists, the case shall be immediately forwarded to HR or higher level of management for handling.


TEAM MEMBER INTERVIEWS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
Team member interviews shall be conducted as a part of an internal investigation. Only AP team members who have successfully completed Target's Assets Protection Internal Interview Certification are authorized to conduct team member interviews.

NOTE: An AP team member who has successfully completed Internal Interviewing Training and is in the process of becoming certified, may conduct a team member interview in the presence of another trained/certified AP team member.

B. Conducting a Team Member Interview
1. Prior to conducting any team member interview, supervisor approval is required.

2. Prior to conducting a team member interview, the AP team member shall partner with:

a. The appropriate HR Partner or STL.

b. The next level AP team member.

NOTE: If the HR or STL/DC Team Leader disagrees with the decision to interview the team member for dishonesty, the AP team member shall meet with the HR and/or STL/DC Team Leader to discuss their concerns. If a mutual agreement cannot be reached, the AP and H. R. team members shall contact the DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL and Human Resources Representative (HRR). Together the DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL and HRR shall make the final decision as to whether or not the team member will be interviewed.

c. The AP team member shall present a written summary of the investigation findings (HR Cover Letter) to the HR or STL/DC Team Leader.

3. Team member interviews are to be conducted in accordance with all Target internal interviewing procedures.

4. Before conducting an interview of a team member there must be evidence that the team member has participated in a dishonest activity. Team member interviews shall NOT be made solely on the basis of an implication by another team member. There must be corroborating evidence in addition to any implication and the evidence shall be presented in the written summary of the investigations findings (HR Cover Letter). Some examples of "Other" evidence:

a. Digital or standard CCTV video

b. Merchandise/hand tags

c. Product wrapping

d. System reports



TIME AND ATTENDANCE VIOLATION INVESTIGATIONS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
If an AP team member becomes aware of any time card/attendance policy violations they shall handle as follows:

1. Immediately forward all information regarding the violation the ETL-HR/Distribution HRM/HRR.

2. Do not conduct an independent investigation into the suspected time card/attendance violation.

3. If an AP team member is requested to support a time card/attendance investigation, contact the DAPTL/Distribution GAPTL or next level AP supervisor for approval.

4. If the time card/attendance violation involves an AP team member, inform the ETL-HR/Distribution HRM/HRR and contact your DATPL/Distribution GAPTL for guidance.



EXECUTIVE INVESTIGATIONS / INTERVIEWS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Investigations
1. AP team members who have knowledge or suspicion of a Target executive violating a company policy shall notify their next level AP supervisor.

2. The supervisor shall make the determination whether to investigate the executive and who shall be responsible for the investigation.

B. Interviews

1. Once the supervisor makes the decision to interview an executive, the interview shall be conducted by one of the following:

a. DAPTL, ITL or Distribution GAPTL

b. GAPTL,

c. Director of Assets Protection, or

d. Vice President of Assets Protection.

2. Prior to engaging in an interview, the interviewer must have prior approval from the GAPTL or Director/Vice President of Assets Protection and the ETL-HR/Distribution HRM/HRR.


UNDERCOVER INVESTIGATIONS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Definition
An undercover investigation is defined as "Placing a contract individual, law enforcement officer or team member into a non-AP store/DC position on multiple occasions for the purpose of uncovering serious security or policy violations."

B. Approval
The Director/Vice President of Assets Protection must approve any investigation where Assets Protection proposes using an undercover investigator. This applies to any store/DC-based undercover investigation.



NOTE: Utilizing AP team member from another Target location to assist store AP related surveillance is not considered to be an undercover investigation. (Example: An ETL-AP/APGL covering vacation at an alternate location for another ETL-AP/APGL.)


PHARMACY INVESTIGATIONS
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
This Directive outlines AP policies for handling Pharmacy Investigations.

B. Investigations
1. Any proposed investigation of a Pharmacist or Pharmacy team member shall be immediately communicate to the DAPTL.

2. The DAPTL shall then discuss the investigation with the Pharmacy Supervisor, GAPTL and ETL-HR prior to any action.

C. Fraudulent Prescriptions
1. AP team members shall not make any apprehensions on fraudulent prescription cases.

2. If requested, AP team members shall support fraudulent prescription cases by gathering evidence for law enforcement (such as video footage, subject or vehicle descriptions, etc.).

3. AP team members shall become involved in fraudulent prescription cases if physical danger is imminent to team members or guests.

4. Pharmacists shall notify local law enforcement and professional boards as required.

D. Pharmacy Keys
1. Pharmacies are operated under a separate keying system. The Pharmacy shall not be opened by anyone other than a registered Pharmacist under any circumstances.



GUEST SERVICE ISSUES / GUEST INCIDENT
Revision: 01-2006 Effective: 02-22-2006
A. Purpose
This section addresses the proper handling of Guest Service Issues and Guest Incident filed at the store level.

B. Guest Issues Involving AP Team Members
1. The ETL-AP shall contact the DAPTL and STL upon notification of any guest issues involving another AP team member.

2. The DAPTL and STL shall determine whether the situation is a Guest Service Issue or a Guest Incident.

C. Guest Service Issues
1. A matter shall be treated as a Guest Service Issue if all of the following apply:

a. The guest complaint relates to the manner in which the guest was treated in the store, such as a NPI or receipt check, and does not involve any claim of bodily injury of property damage,

b. The guest is not represented by an attorney and

c. The matter can be resolved with a guest service payment of $200.00 or less in gift certificates, gift cards or a check.


2. If the matter does not meet all three (3) of the criteria listed above, it must be referred to the Guest Reporting Center to be handled as a Guest Incident.

NOTE: If there is any doubt about the matter meeting any of the Guest Service criteria, contact the Guest Service Reporting Center.

D. Handling a Guest Service Issue
1. The DAPTL shall handle a Guest Service Issue as follows:

a. Partner with the Guest Reporting Center and the STL.

b. Once contacted by the guest, investigate by reviewing any CIRS reports, case files, video, witness statements, etc. regarding the particular incident.

c. Contact the guest and attempt to resolve the issue.

d. Document all actions taken and communications with all parties.

e. Determine the best method to resolve the guest service issue: written apology, guest service payment ($200.00 or less) or an understanding that Target is not at fault.

f. If the matter can be resolved as a guest service issue, contact the GAPTL and present the case.

g. When a resolution has been reached, notify the Store Team Leader (STL) and District Team Leader (DTL) of the situation and resolution type and amount (if applicable).

NOTE: Guest Service payments must be charged to the store or district account, as directed by the DAPTL.

h. If the matter is resolved on a guest service basis, no written release from the guest is necessary.

i. Document all details of the case in CIRS including any type of settlement.



2. If after discussion with the guest it does not appear the matter can be resolved as a Guest Service Issue, report the matter as a Guest Incident and contact the Guest Reporting Center.

E. Guest Incidents

1. Any matter that does not meet the three (3) criteria for a Guest Service Issue (listed in C. 1. above) must be reported to the Guest Reporting Center as a Guest Incident.

NOTE: A claim is reported using the same procedures for reporting a Guest Accident.

2. The DAPTL shall discuss all Claims with their GAPTL and the STL.


===============================

Here is the Court Filing from 9/5/06 however, the best view of the document is found at: http://pub.bna.com/eclr/062116.pdf

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF GEORGIA
ATLANTA DIVISION

Target Corporation, a Minnesota
Corporation, V JOHN Doe, 1 :06-CV-2116
Defendant


For its Complaint, plaintiff Target Corporation ("Target") states and alleges as follows

INTRODUCTION

Target brings this action against an Internet user who is deliberately posting Target copyrighted, confidential, proprietary, and trade secret information across the Internet, including to a website hosted in Minnesota. Target seeks an injunction against Defendant, as well as other available legal and equitable relief arising from Defendant's tortuous actions.

PARTIES
1 . Target is a Minnesota corporation with its principal place of business in Minneapolis, Minnesota .

2 . The true name and capacity of Defendant is unknown to Plaintiff at this time Defendant is known to Plaintiff only by his Internet username "Target Sucks ." Additionally,

Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 1 of 29

2
mrpauljrogers@yahao com, chams46Chotmail .com, anonymousematl2@aol com,
ILovePie@yahoo.com, and usembassysouthafi-ica@hotmail.com

JURISDICTION AND VENUE
3 This Court hasjurisdiction under 17 U .S C § 101 et seq, 28 U .S .C. § 1331(federal question); and 28 U .S C § 1338(a) (copyright) . This Court also has jurisdiction over this matter under 28 U .S C. § 1332(a)(1) because the matter in controversy exceeds the sum or value of $75,000, exclusive of interest and costs, and is between citizens of different states .

4 . Venue in this District is proper under 28 U S C § 1391 and/or 28 U .S.C 1400(a). Although the true identity of Defendant is unknown to Plaintiff at this time, on information and belief, Defendant resides in the State of Georgia and a substantial part of the acts of infringement and rrusappropriahon complained of herein occurred in this District .

FACTUAL BACKGROUND
Target's Business and Valuable Intellectual Property
5 Target owns and operates retail merchandise discount stores across the United States . Today, Target operates more than 1400 TARGET stores, including more than 45 TARGET stores in Georgia

6. As part of its effort to protect its retail stores from physical threats and financial losses, Target, through considerable effort and expense, has created loss prevention procedures and protocols . One of the key loss prevention protocols created by Target is Target's Asset Protection Directives ("Target AP Directives")
7. The Target AP Directives are a set of written methods, techniques and processes that are used by Target's asset protection personnel to secure Target's merchandise


Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 2 of 29

Internet at the website wrAw .targetunion .org . and other property from theft, and to deal with the apprehension of shoplifters and other wrongdoers .

8 . The Target AP Directives are Target copyrighted, confidential, proprietary, and trade secret information .

9 The Target AP Directives include information that is not generally known to the public or in the industry .

10 . Target goes to considerable measures to protect the secrecy of this information The Target AP Directives are password restricted and only available to those employees with a "need-to-know," namely, the asset protection team .

11 . Target has an Information Security Policy where all employees, before commencing their employment, sign an acknowledgement agreeing to maintain the
confidentiality of Target's non-public information . and to never disclose it to anyone outside of the company.

Defendant's Improper Use of Target's AP Directives
12. On or around June 29, 2006, Defendant acquired a copy of Target's AP
Directives from a recently terminated Target employee, Scott Hundt ("Hundt") . Upon information and belief, Hundt only knew Defendant because of his anti-Target website
postings Hundt sent a copy of the Target AP Directives to Defendant by email

13 Hundt, as a former asset protection specialist at a Target store in Wisconsin, improperly kept the Target AP Directives upon termination .

14. On Sunday, July 2, 2006, Hundt also posted the Target AP Directives on the

Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 3 of 29
4
15 . On or around July 10, Target learned of Hundt's improper disclosure to Defendant and the Internet. Shortly thereafter, Target contacted Hundt by telephone Hundt returned Target's telephone call and acknowledged his wrongdoing . Hundt immediately deleted all references to the Target AP Directives from his hard drive and from the Internet .

16 . Target also demanded that Hundt contact Defendant and request that Defendant destroy the Target AP Directives, delete any Internet postings of the Target AP Directives posted by him, and never use them again . Hundt stated that he did not know Defendant's name or address, and did not personally know him, but had his email address . Hundt emailed Defendant and requested him to remove the postings, but Defendant failed to respond.

17. Hundt also provided Target with the email address that Hundt had for Defendant Target emailed Hundt a cease and desist letter at that address, but received no response .

18 Instead of abiding by Target and Hundt's demands to remove the Target AP Directives, Defendant began posting the Target AP Directives on various retail-employee forums on the Internet, including the following locations :
http //targetsucks elevation24 coin
http //targeiuniora org
http bullseyebb .aivardspace coin
http ://targetstoressuck blogspot corn
http //www retail-worker corn
http .//people tribe net

Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 4 of 29
5
19. Beginning on or around July 12, 2006, Target, through its counsel, sent demand letters to the moderators and administrators of the websites that posted Target AP Directives. Target advised them that Defendant, under the alias "Target Sucks," was posting improperly Target copyrighted, confidential, proprietary, and trade secret information . (A copy of a sample letter sent to the moderators/administrators is attached as Ex . A )

20. In conjunction with writing to the moderators and/or administrators, Target also attempted to contact Defendant directly by sending private messages to Defendant
through the forums . (A copy of two sample emails sent to Defendant are attached as Ex . B.)

21 In response to Target's demand letters, the administrators and/or moderators removed the Target AP Directives from their websrtes .

22. Defendant, however, did not respond to Target's email messages . Instead, Defendant re-posted the Target AP Directives as soon as the moderator and/or administrator removed them from the website. Target re-contacted the moderators and/or adrrunistrators, and the information was again deleted . Indeed, at least one of the websites - http //targetstoressuck blogspot.com - terminated Defendant's blog .

23 . On July 27, 2006, the moderator of -www .retail-worker coin posted Target's cease and desist letter on its website and explained why she deleted Defendant's posting of the Target AP Directives . An exchange between Defendant and the moderator ensued, whereby Defendant admitted that he was posting the Target AP Directives for no reason other than to harm Target . (A copy of the email exchange is attached as Ex C .)

24. Since July 27, 2006, Defendant continues to re-post (or attempt to re-post) the Target AP Directives on the Internet At websites where his blog was inactivated, he has changed his username in order to be able to re-post the Target AP Directives

Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 5 of 29
6
25 . Defendant's actions are a complete and intentional disregard of Target's property rights . Since July 27, 2006, Defendant had posted on numerous websites that "Target's lawyers are monitoring this website ." In response to Target's cease and desist letter, Defendant states on the Internet that he does not care whether the Target AP Directives are copyrighted or trade secrets :
As to whether or not said info is in some form `protected', I have no idea and don't care I saw it both online already posted and via email and if someone at T let the cat out of the bag then that is between T and them . I didn't sign any
confidentiality agreement with them and really don't give a rats ass if they like it or not .
(A copy of the posting is attached hereto as Ex . D )

26. Defendant has never responded to Target's demands for Defendant to cease and desist posting the Target AP Directives .

27 . Through various investigative techniques employed by Target over the last few weeks, Target believes that Defendant uses America On-Line as his Internet Service Provider Target believes that information obtained in discovery will lead to the verification of Defendant's true name and address

COUNT I
Infringement of Copyrights
28 Target realleges and incorporates by reference herein the foregoing allegations of the Complaint .

29 Target is, and at all relevant times has been, the copyright owners of exclusive rights under United States copyright law with respect to certain copyrighted Target AP Directives .
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 6 of 29

7
30 . The Target AP Directives are subject to a valid Certificate of Copyright Registration issued by the Registrar of Copyrights to Target as specified on Exhibit E

31 . Among the exclusive rights granted to Target under the Copyright Act are the exclusive rights to reproduce the Target AP Directives and to distribute the Target AP Directives

32 . Defendant, without the permission or consent of Target, has used, and continues to use, the Internet, to disserrvnate and/or make available for distribution to others, the Target AP Directives .

33 . Defendant's dissemination of the Target AP Directives is deliberate, willful, malicious, oppressive, and without regard to Target's proprietary rights

34 . As a result of Defendant's infringement of Target's copyrights and exclusive rights under copyright, Target is entitled to statutory damages pursuant to 17 U S .C § 504(c)against Defendant for each infringement by Defendant . Target is also entitled to its attorneys' fees and costs pursuant to 17 U S C . § 505 .
35 Defendant's copyright infringement, and the threat of continuing infringement, has caused, and will continue to cause, Target repeated and irreparable injury . It would be difficult to ascertain the amount of money damages that would afford Target adequate relief at law for Defendant's acts and continuing acts, and a multiplicity ofjudicial proceedings that would be required Target's remedy at law is not adequate to compensate them for the injuries already inflicted and further threatened by Defendant . Therefore, Defendant should be restrained and enjoined pursuant to the Copyright Act, 17 U S .C. § § 502 and 503

COUNT II
Misappropriation of Trade Secrets

Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 7 of 29
Court

36. Target realleges and incorporates by reference herein the foregoing allegations of the Complaint.

37 Defendant acquired confidential and proprietary information belonging to Target.

38 Defendant was advised that the information he acquired was Target trade secret information that should not be used or disclosed by him .

39 After receiving notice of the confidentiality of the Target trade secret
information, Defendant had a duty to Target to maintain the secrecy of this information and limit its use for the benefit of only Target .

40. This confidential and proprietary information had independent economic value because it was not generally known to or readily ascertainable by persons outside of Target

41 Target intended to keep this information confidential and has made reasonable efforts under the circumstances to maintain the secrecy of the information .

42. Defendant has used and/or disclosed, and continues to use and/or disclose, such information without the express or implied consent of Target, for the benefit of himself . Such use constitutes a violation of Ga Stat . § 10-1-760 et seq, and Georgia common law principles against misappropriation of trade secrets

43 . As a direct and proximate cause of Defendant's misappropriation of trade secrets, Target has been damaged in an amount greater than $75,000, the specific amount of which shall be determined at trial In addition, Target has suffered irreparable harm and will continue to suffer irreparable harm unless the conduct of the Defendant is enjoined by this

Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 8 of 29
9
WHEREFORE , Plaintiff Target Corporation respectfully requests judgment against
Defendant as follows :
An injunction, among other things, prohibiting Defendant from disclosing and using the Target AP Directives and requiring Defendant to delete all Internet postings created by him of the Target AP Directives ;
2. Statutory damages for each infringement pursuant to 17 U .S.C § 504;
Recovery of Target's costs and attorneys' fees incurred herein ; and
4 Any further relief that the Court deems just and equitable .

Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 9 of 29
1 0
DUNCAN & MANGIAFICO, PC :
,., Dated. September 1, 2006
nnife C Adair (#001901)
uite 220
7000 Central Parkway
Atlanta, GA 30328
Telephone. (770)698-4560
Facsimile : (770)698-4565
FAEGRE & BENSON LLP :
s/Dara Mann
Dara Mann (#469065)
Suite 1900
3350 Riverwood Parkway
Atlanta, GA 30330
Telephone : (678) 627-8190
Facsitrule• (612) 766-1600
ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF
TARGET CORPORATION
Of Counsel
(upon admission pro hac vice)
James R. Steffen (MN #469065)
Kerry L. Bundy (MN #266917)
Faegre & Benson
2200 Wells Fargo Center
90 South Seventh Street
Minneapolis, MN 55402
Telephone : (612) 766-7000
Facsimle : (612) 766-1600
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 10 of 29
KERRY L BUNDY

'lien" VIA E-MAIL
Administrator of "Return of the Target Sucks" Website
VIA E-NL4[L
Dear "Jen"/Ms . Destree :
EXHIBIT A

July 11, 2005
Jennifer Destree
Registrant of elevation24 .com
733 Hickory Avenue
Orangevale, CA 95662

Re. Improper Disclosure of Target's AP Directives on Website

We represent Target Corporation and Target Brands, Inc . (collectively, "Farget") in
connection with intellectual property matters and in connection with their ongoing efforts to maintain the security and confidentiality of its proprietary information We are writing to you in your capacity as Administrator and/or Registrant of the blog website http //targetsucks elevation24 com to advise you that a post to the website contains Target confidential, proprietary and trade secret information that has been improperly disclosed In addition, the post wrongfully reproduces copyrighted material belonging to Target
[n case you were not aware, on July 2, 2006, user name "Target Sucks" posted to your
website Target's 2006 Asset Protection Directives . These directives include information which is used in the conduct of Target's asset protection program and is not generally known to the public or in the industry. Target goes to considerable measures to protect the secrecy of this information As it appears from your posts that you are a current and,lor former Target employee, you are most likely aware that under Target's policies and procedures, any Target employee who is given access to the Asset Protection Directives is required strictly to maintain the confidentiality of this information

As we hope you can appreciate, Target considers the improper disclosure of its 2006
Asset Protection Directives on the "targetsucks" website to be a very serious matter . Allowing Target's confidential and proprietary security procedures to remain posted on the website provides potential wrongdoers with a blueprint for circumventing Target's security procedures in connection with shoplifting or other criminal activity This not only jeopardizes Target's property, but also could jeopardize the safety of Target customers and employees

Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 11 of 29

Page 2
We note that the rules of your forum expressly state that "Me owners of Return of the
Target Sucks reserve the right to remove, edit, move or close any thread for any reason ." Under the circumstances here, Target asks that you remove the July 2, 2006, and any other posting of Target's 2006 Asset Protection Directives at your earliest possible convenience In addition, to allow us to follow up directly with the individual who wrongfully posted the 2006 Asset Protection Directives, we ask that you promptly supply us with contact information for poster "Target Sucks "
Your anticipated cooperation is appreciated, and we look forward to receiving prompt
confirmation that you have removed the 2006 Asset Protection Directives from your site and to your provision of contact information for the individual that posted the2006 Asset Protection Directives.

Sincerely,

Kerry L Bundy


=====================


Newspaper Report About the Suit:


Atlanta Business Chronicle
Friday 9-15-06
By Justin Rubner, Staff Writer

Suit: Blogger posted Target trade secrets

Target Corp. is on the hunt for a feisty blogger who has allegedly posted the retail giant's secrets on the Internet.

The Minneapolis-based company is suing the unidentified "John Doe", who is believed to live in Georgia, in Federal Court for posting Target's anti-theft procedures on Web sites and various retail employee forums on the Internet in July.

The information is used to secure Target's merchandise from shoplifters and other wrongdoers. Target says in a court filing it is provided to employees on a "need-to-know" basis.

To find out who the "John Doe" is, Target is seeking the help of AOL, Yahoo!Inc. and Microsoft Corp. It's unclear whether these companies will comply, though.

The lawsuit, filed Sept. 5th in Federal Court in Atlanta, follows a two and a half month campaign that included efforts to get the multiple postings deleted from various message boards.

It also follows the publishing of Wal-Mart Stores Inc.'s recent theft-prevention policy change, leaked to the New York Times in July, which said shoplifters would no longer be charged for stealing less than $25 in goods.

Shoplifting is a $10 billion to $13 billion a year nightmare for U.S. retailers, according to California-based retail security expert Chris McGoey, also known as the "Crime Doctor". Even though stores such as Target and Wal-Mart rack in tens of billions of dollars of sales annually, shoplifting can account for up to 3 percent of those sales every year, he says.

"That's profit they should have gained," said McGoey, who advises almost every national retail chain in the country.

Target operates more than 1,400 stores, including 45 in Georgia.

Target's lawsuit illustrates the lengths to which companies will go to protect secret information from reaching the masses, said Jason Bernstein, an Atlanta-based intellectual property attorney at Powell Goldstein LLP. He says Target is trying to send a clear message to rogue posters that the publishing of trade secrets is something the company will not stand for.

"It's demonstrating to me an incredible awareness these companies have of the importance of their trade secrets and confidential info because they rely on them to increase sales and prevent theft," Bernstein said. "Companies like Target, they're also trying to send a statement to the industry. They're probably very upset over this."

In the lawsuit, Target claims the postings have already led to losses and that they provide "potential wrongdoers with the blueprint for circumventing Target's security procedures." The policy which Atlanta Business Chronicle obtained at targetunion.org, outlines in detail various rules, such as mandating that all thefts above $20 must be referred for prosecution and barring anyone from photographing employees who have been caught shoplifting.

If Target does ID the blogger, and he or she still refuses to cease the postings, the company faces some sticky issues, a First Amendment and intellectual property expert says.

For one, it is not known whether the poster ever signed a confidentiality decree. If the John Doe didn't, then Target would have to prove the poster knew the policy was confidential, said David Bodney, a First Amendment and media rights lawyer with Phoenix-based Steptoe & Johnson LLP. Bodney, also a lecturer at Arizona State University, adds that Target would have to prove the postings had no legitimate purpose other than to malign. "It's an uphill battle, he said.

However, he also points out that free speech is not absolute, especially if a judge decides – as Target claims – that the policy is a court-protected company secret.

"It's a disappointing reality that our constitutional liberties are conditional," Bodney said.

According the suit, the poster obtained the 30-plus-page policy from a terminated Target theft prevention employee in Wisconsin. That employee allegedly e-mailed the policy to the John Doe and only knew the poster through his association with the anti-Target Web sites.

In July, just days after the employee posted the policy on targetunion.org, the suit says Target contacted the employee and demanded he delete it from the site and his computer. He allegedly obliged, but the John Doe never did – despite the fact that Target contacted the poster's various e-mail accounts and posted messages on popular anti-Target Web sites demanding the practice to stop.

In response to one of Target's postings, the blogger – who used screen names such as "Target Sucks" – allegedly wrote online "I didn't sign any confidentiality agreement with them and really don't give a rat's ass if they like it or not." The poster also warned others on targetunion.org that Target law firm Faegre & Benson was monitoring the site, and published attorney Kerry Bundy's e-mail address and phone number. In response, another poster wished "a million scrounger" on the law firm. A scrunge is a parasitic alien on Nintendo video games.

An e-expert was hard pressed to predict which side has the upper hand. Eugene Volokh, a University of California law professor who specializes in free speech issues, compares the case to four others: three involving Apple Computer Inc., and one involving Fort Motor Co. Apple has had mixed luck with its ongoing war against leakers in recent years. And Ford in 1999, lost a lawsuit regarding a blogger who posted corporate documents showing some negative information about the company's vehicles. The site, blueovalnews.com, still exists today.

Sidebar:
Protecting secrets or targeting free speech?

Target Corp. is suing a blogger for posting a secret theft-prevention policy online.

* The unknown poster is believed to live in Georgia
* Target is asking AOL, Yahoo! And Microsoft for help in locating the poster
* The policy has been posted on several sites, including retail-worker.com and targetunion.org
============================


Source: Complaint No 1:06-CV-2116 filed in U.S. District Court in Atlanta.


Wednesday, October 25, 2006

U.S. Sues Target Stores for Discrimination!


Target Discriminates - EEOC Files Suit!

I guess that Target HQ is just too busy chasing bloggers to sort out their own HR Dept. Take a look at this -


=============================
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
-----------------------------------------------------------
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Dennis McBride
August 24, 2006 EEOC Trial Attorney
Milwaukee Area Office
(414) 297-4188

Jean P. Kamp
Associate Regional Attorney
Chicago District Office
(312) 353-7719

John C. Hendrickson
EEOC Regional Attorney
Chicago District Office
(312) 353-8551
TTY: (312) 353-2421


COURT OF APPEALS RULES TARGET MUST FACE TRIAL ON RACE DISCRIMINATION CHARGES

EEOC Presented Evidence That Retail Giant Failed to Hire Four African Americans in Milwaukee Stores Because of Race

CHICAGO –
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago has reversed a lower federal court in Milwaukee and ruled that an U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) race discrimination suit against the giant retailer Target Corporation should go to trial. The appeals court found that the EEOC had presented sufficient evidence -- that Target refused to hire four African American applicants for entry-level management positions because of their race -- to require a full trial. The court also held that a trial was required on the issue of whether Target had destroyed employment applications in bad faith, and whether its changed policies with respect to retaining records were sufficient.

"We find," the court wrote, "that the EEOC did present sufficient evidence to establish a genuine issue of material fact as to whether Target's reason for not interviewing [the African-American applicants] was a pretext for race discrimination."

"EEOC has long been convinced that the evidence we were placing of record in this case was more than enough to require that the victims of Target's alleged discrimination be afforded their day in court — their day in front of a jury," said John Hendrickson, EEOC regional attorney for the Chicago District, which now includes Milwaukee. "Thanks to this important decision from the Court of Appeals, that day is now going to come, and we are very encouraged and pleased by that."

Dennis McBride, the trial attorney in the EEOC's Milwaukee Area Office who has led the government litigation effort, said, "This seems to us to be a classic case illustrating the negative impact that race still may have upon the search for work even at leading big-name employers who are marketing to millions of African Americans. The EEOC's allegations include, for example, that Target had recruited for entry-level management positions at multi-cultural college job fairs, but then failed to consider African American applicants because of their race. That's at the heart of what this case is about and why we are in it."

The court's unanimous decision (EEOC v. Target Corporation, 7th Cir. No. 04-3559, 8/23/2006) was authored by Circuit Judge Richard D. Cudahy and issued on August 23, 2006. It reversed the decision of Chief Judge Rudolph T. Randa of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, which had granted summary judgment to Target, and ordered that the matter be remanded to the district court.

James Tucker and Lorraine Davis in the EEOC Office of General Counsel in Washington, D.C. represented the agency on the appeal to the Seventh Circuit.

EEOC associate regional attorney in the Chicago District Jean Kamp noted, "One of the most significant evidentiary points here arose from the fact that one of the African American applicants included in the EEOC's suit seemed to be well on the way to landing at job at Target, until the store realized from her name and voice that she was likely to be black — and then the job disappeared. So the Court of Appeals' ruling that the EEOC may utilize expert evidence at trial to the effect that employers may discriminate based on African-American names or accents during telephone conversations is very important."

The EEOC is responsible for enforcing the nation's laws prohibiting employment discrimination based on race, color, gender (including sexual harassment and pregnancy), religion, national origin, age, disability and retaliation. Further information about the EEOC is available on its web site at www.eeoc.gov.




==========================

Web Links for Your Reference, Copy & Save!


Links to other sites that may interest you:
Below are links for various sites that might be of interest.

You might want to highlight/copy and take the whole list to your own computer file.
==================================================

29 Page 'Is Wal Mart Safe' - Crime Report -http://www.walmartcrimereport.com/report.pdf

A Target Site, but only 100 members -
http://bullseyebb.awardspace.com/index.php

Anti Wal Mart Site w/11,000 Users -
http://www.wallyworldsucks.com/

Anti Wal Mart Site, 4500 members -
http://www.walmart-blows.com/forum/index.php?sid=b934681dc89ad9f7a0384e21afb6b7ff

Anti Wal-Mart message board w/8 pages of links -
http://groups.msn.com/ABUSEDBYWALMART/home

Anti Wal-Mart Site -
http://www.walmart-blows.com/forum/index.php?sid=b934681dc89ad9f7a0384e21afb6b7ff

Anti Wal-Mart Site - Worth a Look -
http://walmartwatch.com/

AP/LP Site -
http://www.retailspy.com/

Attorney for Target Stores - Ms. K L Bundy -
http://www.faegre.com/lawyer_bio.aspx?pid=7371

Consumer Site - Look up your least favorite retail chain and see the complaints! -
www.badbusinessbureau.com

Consumer Site w/radio show has various message boards for complaints, based in Atlanta
http://www.clarkhoward.com

Find Out How Unions Rip You Off -
http://unionfacts.com/

Forums for 15+ retail chains, 27,000 Users -
http://www.retailworker.com/

Gen. Consumer Comp. site w/250+ Target complaints -
http://www.my3cents.com/

Great Retail Industry Site - Take a Look! -
http://retailindustry.about.com/od/lp/a/bl_hayes_theft.htm?rd=1

message board for those who have worked at Target -
http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/TargetSucks/?yguid=262065473

Site has 16+ forums for retail stores, an active site -
www.retailworker.com

Target as bad as Wal-Mart? You decide! -
http://www.alternet.org/workplace/35610/

Target Attys Cease & Desist Order for Directives -
http://www.retail-worker.com/documents/20060727.target_cease_and_desist.pdf

Target Employees' Web Site -
http://www.targetunion.org/

Vetrans Against Target Policies -
http://www.uppins.com/target.html

Wal Marts Approach to Shoplifting -
http://blog.wakeupwalmart.com/ufcw/2006/06/walmarts_latest_1.html

Want To Know Your IP Address?? -
http://www.lawrencegoetz.com/programs/ipinfo/

Web Site w/ forums for various retail chains, not very active, few members -
http://www.retail-worker.com/forum/index.php

29 Page Wal-Mart Crime Report
http://www.walmartcrimereport.com/report.pdf

Buy Some Target Gift Items, Shirts, Caps, Cups, Magnets, Etc.
http://www.cafepress.com/targetsucks

Target Targets Blogger, Consumer Site
http://www.consumerist.com/consumer/target/target-targets-blogger-201306.php


==========================



The Attorney Representing Target is:



Representing Target Corporation is:

Kerry L. Bundy
Partner
kbundy@faegre.com
+1 612-766-8217

Kerry L. Bundy
Age: 35 (Mar. 71)

Home Address:
5428 Knox Ave S
Minneapolis, MN 55419-1502
(612) 929-2917

Prior addresses:

KERRY L BUNDY
24 BIRNAMWOOD DR
BURNSVILLE, MN 55337 (952) 890-2273

KERRY L BUNDY
1205 LINCOLN AVE
MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55403 County (612) 377-1981

KERRY L BUNDY
3150 EXCELSIOR BLVD
MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55416 County (952) 922-3062

KERRY BUNDY
13417 BRUNSWICK AVE S
SAVAGE, MN 55378


-----------------------
Relatives:
Bradley P. Bundy
Kimberly M. Bundy
Patricia M. Bundy
------------------------

Partner, Faegre & Benson LLP
kbundy@faegre.com
+1 612-766-8217

Office Address:
Minneapolis Office
Faegre & Benson LLP
2200 Wells Fargo Center
90 South Seventh Street
Minneapolis, MN 55402-3901
Phone: 612-766-7000
Toll-Free: 800-328-4393
Fax: 612-766-1600

Practice Areas:

Litigation
Distribution and Franchise Litigation
Trade Secrets
International Arbitration
Complex Commercial Litigation

Experience:

Kerry Bundy is a partner in the business litigation department at Faegre & Benson in the Minneapolis office. She concentrates her practice on trade secret litigation and counseling, franchise and distribution litigation, international arbitration, and complex commercial litigation. She has represented manufacturers, franchisors, distributors, technology companies, and a variety of other domestic and foreign businesses in state and federal proceedings, as well as national and international arbitrations.

Kerry is a member of the Governing Committee of the American Bar Association Forum on Franchising. She has presented seminars at national conferences on franchise matters, including "The Essentials on Franchising," and "System-Wide Change in the Franchise System." She was selected as one of ten up-and-coming Twin Cities lawyers by Minnesota Lawyer magazine. Also, she currently serves on the Board of Directors for Courage Alpine Skiers, a non-profit adaptive down-hill skiing program for persons with disabilities.

Education:

BA, Colorado State University (1993), magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa
JD, Northwestern University (1996), Dean's List, Journal of International Law and Business (Editor-in-Chief)

Presentations:

Effective Opening Statements and Closing Remarks
American Bar Association Forum on Franchising CLE
Procedural Considerations for Filing a Franchise Complaint: Jurisidiction, Venue and Choice of Law
American Bar Association Forum on Franchising CLE
System-Wide Change: Rising to the Challenge
American Bar Association Forum on Franchising CLE
The Secrets to Winning Trade Secret Cases
Minnesota State Bar Association CLE
The Essentials of Franchising: Intellectual Property
American Bar Association Forum on Franchising CLE

Professional and Trade Associations:

American Bar Association Forum on Franchising, Steering Committee Member for the Litigation and Dispute Resolution Division (2003-2006)
American Bar Association Forum on Franchising, Young Lawyers Division Representative on the Governing Committee (2001-2003)
Hennepin County Bar Association, Civil Litigation Section co-chair

Civic Associations:
Board of Directors, Courage Alpine Skiers

Admitted to Practice (State)
Minnesota
Admitted to Practice (Federal)

U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit


==============================



I was looking for something else on the web and came across this rather long article, but if you are interested in the topic you might want to take a look:

=========================

Target: Wal-Mart Lite

by Kari Lydersen, Special to CorpWatchApril 20th, 2006

Shopping in a Target store, you know you're not in Wal-Mart. But the differences may be mostly skin deep.

Targets are spaciously laid out and full of attractive displays and promotions. While many people associate Wal-Mart with low-income, rural communities perhaps dominated by a prison or power plant, life-size photos throughout Target stores remind you that their customers are a lively, beautiful cast of multi-cultural hipsters.

"Their image is more upscale, more urban and sophisticated, sort of a wannabe Pottery Barn," said Victoria Cervantes, a hospital administrator and documentary-maker in Chicago who regularly shops at Target. "I'm not sure if their customers really are more upscale. But that's the image they're going for. They have a very good PR campaign."

In contrast to this image, however, critics say that in terms of wages and benefits, working conditions, sweatshop-style foreign suppliers, and effects on local retail communities, big box Target stores are very much like Wal-Mart, just in a prettier package.

Of more than 1,400 Target stores employing more than 300,000 people nationwide, not one has a union. Employees at various stores say an anti-union message and video is part of the new-employee orientation. At stores in the Twin Cities, where Target is headquartered, the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) union Local 789 has been trying for several years to help Target employees organize, with little luck.
"People ask what the difference between Wal-Mart and Target is," said UFCW organizer Bernie Hesse. "Nothing, except that Wal-Mart is six times bigger. The wages start at $7.25 to $7.50 an hour [at Target]. They'll say that's a competitive wage, but they can't say it's a living wage. We know a lot of their managers are telling people, 'If we find out you're involved in organizing a union you'll get fired.'"
Wal-Mart has about 3,800 stores nationwide and another 2,600 worldwide, employing about 1.6 million people. Target plans to open at least 600 more stores by 2010, for a total of about 2,000 in 47 states. Like Wal-Mart, a typical Target sells a wide range of consumer goods including clothing, household items, office supplies, toys, sports equipment, furniture, art, and electronics; and the stores often have photo laboratories and pharmacies.

About 160 SuperTargets nationwide also sell "upscale" groceries, as the company's website describes them, and often contain banks, Starbucks, and Pizza Hut Express outlets. Total revenue was up 12.3 percent in 2005 – $52.6 billion compared to $46.8 billion in 2004.

Wage Slaves
A survey by the UFCW found that starting wages are similar in Targets and Wal-Marts -- possibly higher overall at Wal-Marts – and that Target benefits packages are often harder to qualify for and less comprehensive. (Target's media relations department refused to comment on its wages and benefits policies; individual wages and benefits policies are not included in their annual report.)

"We know that Target and Wal-Mart are constantly checking each other out and seeing how cheap they can get by," says a UFCW statement on the website Targetunion.org, urging Target employees around the country to post their wages.

A Target employee who asked that his name and store location be kept secret said he can barely make ends meet on his salary of $8.40 an hour.

"After three years, I have received less than $1 an hour in raises. I started at $7.65," said the worker, adding that he does love his job because of camaraderie with his co-workers. "We are never compensated and rarely even recognized for meeting our goals."

The starting wage he describes would put a single parent with two kids working full time at Target just slightly above the poverty line; someone with more children or working fewer hours would fall below the poverty line.

Compare that to Target CEO Robert Ulrich, who earned $23.1 million in 2005, according to Forbes, making him the second-highest paid CEO in the retail sector. That's more than 1300 times as much as the worker we spoke to.

Sweat on the Racks?
Meanwhile a glance at labels on a few racks of stylish $20 cardigans and capri pants shows that, like Wal-Mart and most major clothing retailers, Target itself sources its products in India, Indonesia, Guatemala, Mexico, Bangladesh, Kenya, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia and other low-wage, developing countries.
In October 2005 representatives of a Mexican labor federation protested outside a Bronx Target to call attention to alleged child labor and illegal worker lockouts at a Mexican factory that supplies the store's Halloween costumes.

"The way the global garment industry is, there are so few factories that respect workers' rights that there is no way Target gets its clothes from workplaces where workers' rights are being respected," said Allie Robbins, national organizer of the group United Students Against Sweatshops.

Race to the Bottom
Target doesn't differ from most major clothing vendors; you usually have to seek out small specialty companies to find union-made, American-made textiles. But as one of the country's major retailers, Target is an industry leader, fostering and profiting from the U.S.'s general culture of consumerism: We buy, buy, buy at ever lower prices in a market system sustained by very low-paid, non-union workforces in impoverished countries.

Even as American consumerism thrives, however, there is growing public awareness and critique of the problems it spawns. Wal-Mart is becoming a lightning rod for the public's increasing dissatisfaction and animosity. A recent study by the University of Massachusetts at Lowell showed that 63 percent of people would oppose a Wal-Mart opening in their community. Groups such as Wal-Mart Watch, several documentarians have harshly critiqued Wal-Mart's working conditions and its effects on communities and international labor standards.

But somehow, perhaps because of its relative small size compared to Wal-Mart, Target has largely avoided negative publicity.

In fact, it benefits from anti-Wal-Mart anger, a fact that isn't lost on company officials.

Media reports describe Target executives booing and hissing at a Wal-Mart logo during sales meetings and calling it the "evil empire." While communities often fight tooth and nail against new Wal-Marts, residents usually welcome Targets, as local governments offer the corporation generous tax breaks and subsidies to locate in their area.

That is what happened last fall in West St. Paul, Minn., where a new Target reaped $731,000 in local tax breaks, while 30 miles away, Ham Lake was fighting Wal-Mart's efforts to open a superstore. The Target in downtown Minneapolis received $68 million in public subsidies, according to the Star Tribune newspaper. In Chicago in 2004, a city-wide coalition formed to oppose two proposed Wal-Marts and the fight roiled the city council for months. Meanwhile at least three new Target stores have been built in the metro area in the last several years.

Target definitely works hard on its image. Last summer it became the first company to sponsor an entire issue of The New Yorker, with 17 pages of ads. With a 2005 advertising budget of $1.028 billion, it regularly takes out full page ads in major daily papers and magazines, promoting the company's products, and sophisticated image as well as its charity work. The company's website says that 96 percent of Americans recognize the Target logo, "more than the Swoosh or Apple." Unlike Wal-Mart's low-budget, cluttered decor, Target sports artsy, larger-than-life photos of everything from cleaning products to desserts to women in lingerie. It is the exclusive marketer of specialty items such as the Roots "retro-futurism" official gear for the 2006 Winter Olympics. Target's website notes that its average consumer has a median household income of $55,000, and 43 percent have completed college.
"It's like they're trying to be Marshall Fields or something," said Chicago high school student Stephanie Evans, shopping for a bikini for spring break. "But it's really the same things as at Wal-Mart, just at higher prices."


The first Target discount store opened in Roseville, Minnesota, a suburb of St. Paul, in 1962. It was run by the Dayton Company, which originated in 1902 with a retail store called Goodfellows owned by George Dayton in Minneapolis. Along with the discount stores, Target Corp. runs Target Financial Services, which manages the Target REDcard credit card.

Target: We Train the FBI

Perhaps Target's oddest singularity is the fact that it boasts one of the nation's top forensics labs at its company headquarters. A product of its efforts to stop shoplifting and property destruction at its stores, its mastery of surveillance and investigative technology and strategy is now eagerly subscribed to by law enforcement agencies nationwide, including the FBI. The company provides training for police and federal agents on investigation and prevention of everything from arson and robbery to smuggling.

Target does more proportionately for the community in the form of community grants and charity than Wal-Mart does, and spends considerably less boating about it. According to the company website, which says Target donates more than $2 million a week to local and national non-profit organizations. The company gives grants of $1,000 to $3,000 to community organizations, and shoppers can donate 1 percent of Target REDcard charges to a local school. The website says more than $154 million has been donated to schools since 1997. The company also runs Target House, a luxury residential facility in Memphis where families can stay while their seriously ill children are treated at a nearby medical center.

In comparison, Wal-Mart, with revenue of $288 billion in 2005, donated $200 million (or 7/100ths of a percent) to charities and organizations in 2005, according to its web site.
While many customers and employees praise Target's charity efforts, critics counter that the company would have more positive impact on communities by providing living wage, stable jobs to local residents.

Following the general trend in retail and the U.S. job market as a whole, Target relies on part-time workers. This schedule may work well for some students and retired people, but it contributes to a dearth of full-time, fully benefitted, stable employment – especially in communities reeling from the store's impact on small local businesses.


"If I needed a full time job I couldn't afford to work here," said "Rosa" a 57-year-old who works part time at a St. Paul Target near her house. (Her name has been changed because she fears retribution.) "It starts at $7.50 an hour and you only get a 50-cent raise once a year. So how long will it take you to even get to $10 an hour! You can't live on that."

Diversity Dilemma
Target's website says diversity is a core value for employees and customers. It says Target is above national averages in employing minorities, both in the overall workforce (21 percent) and managerial positions (38 percent).

But that may depend on the store. Hesse said that some of the many Somalis refugees employed in the Twin Cities stores complain about cultural insensitivity and discrimination.

"Entry level management people just don't know how to handle it, they seem to be insensitive to immigrant workers," said Hesse. "In one store, there's a lot of friction between managers and Somali workers. They hire these young white boys as managers, and then they run a crew of Somalis with a very condescending attitude."
An African-American employee at the flagship Roseville, Minn. store (who asked that her name not be used for fear of retribution), said she feels as if she constantly suffers racial discrimination. She said there are no black supervisors on the overnight shift she works. "There are a lot of Somalis working on the overnight shift, but no Somali team leader." She said she is tired of young white "team leaders" repeatedly telling her to work faster or do things differently.
"It's the same conversation over and over," said the middle-aged woman. "They treat us like we're kids. And they'll approach you in front of other crew members, not in the office or somewhere private."

She thinks she was unfairly given a document from management saying she needed to increase her work speed.

"I feel like I was discriminated against because I'm black," she said. "I talked to white co-workers who I was working side by side with, and I could see I was working just as fast as them. I asked them if they had to sign the paper [from management] saying they were too slow and they did not. The majority who got the "guidance" slips were Somali or African-American like myself."

Beat the Clock
Workers generally complain about a pressurized and patronizing work atmosphere where they are constantly pressed to work harder and faster and at the same time to act cheery and invested in the store's success. The company's website boasts that workers will respond with "cheetah-like" speed within 60 seconds to customer calls on the red phones throughout the store.

Rosa said employees are constantly exhorted to get shoppers to sign up for Target REDcards; some stores have weekly quotas. "They'll have little employee promotions, it's so ridiculous, you'll get candy or a liter of pop if you get two people to sign up," she said.

She said the store is generally understaffed and workers are expected to do numerous jobs at the same time.

"You're running around, feeling like you're being pulled in every direction," she said. "There's never enough people on the sales floor. You're getting calls to come up to the cash register, to do pulls [of merchandise] in the back room, to deal with returns at guest services, all at once. And the whole time you're constantly picking up and folding stuff, getting things off the floor. At my age it's a really hard day, on your feet the whole time on these linoleum floors. I'm aching when I get home. I have to take Ibuprofen just to be able to sleep."

John Hayden had a similar experience working in a Target distribution center near his home in Oconomowoc, Wisc. After quitting his Target job in 2002, he was diagnosed with a hernia which he blames on lifting up to 700 boxes a day.
"It was hard work," said Hayden, who was in his late 50s at the time. "We never produced enough to keep the middle managers happy. I think they plan it that way – they always want more."

Could it Be Different?
In today's market, could retail really be any different? Fair labor advocates think so. Hesse notes that in several unionized grocery stores in the Twin Cities, hourly wages hover around $13 to $17 an hour, roughly double Target's. Now SuperTarget's sale of groceries threatens the survival of union grocery stores.
Even other major big box retailers have managed to pay significantly higher wages and achieve higher employee retention. The prices at Costco Wholesale Corp., the nation's fifth largest retailer, are competitive with those at Target and Wal-Mart, but it pays full-time employees an average of around $16 an hour along with generous health benefits.

Costco pulls this off by offering fewer brands of each item, keeping infrastructure costs low and forgoing advertising; and the company also benefits financially from low employee turnover. Labor advocates also note that The Container Store is known for decent wages and good working conditions.

"We've turned into a nation of consumers, not citizens," said Hesse. "We need to make retailers and employers bring back the old social contract where if you work hard and give them full time, they have to treat you with some degree of dignity and pay you enough that you don't need to worry about your basic needs all the time."




============================================

***Stealing SuperTarget: How to Hit the Bullseye***

By: Xap
First Created Industriously on: 11/28/2004

Between the Hours of: Midnight and 8 AM

Boring but Necessary Disclaimer:
The following document is purely for informational and entertainment purposes, and the sole responsibility for any illegal actions lies with the reader. The author is in no way responsible for the mistakes the amateurs will make while potentially
attempting to perform things described herein. Read at your own risk.

Oh - and if you do get caught, tell 'em Xap (pronounced "zap") sent ya.
They won't know me, but they'll probably think the name is clever.

***********************************************************

So, you've decided to join the Five-Finger discount club offered by so many ine retailers today. The most popular store chain around where I live seems to be Target and SuperTarget. I mean, great prices and none of the evil and filth you find at Wal-Mart, right? And look at all the incredibly expensive goods your sticky little fingers just can't wait to shove in your pockets. . .but wait. . .what's going to happen if someone who works for the
store catches you stealing? How can you get away with it?

To allay the fears of many readers that this is going to be just another
stupid file written by an acnefied teen h4ck3r. . .(sorry, "cracker", I
don't believe the media stereotypes either) everything written here is
absolutely true Target procedure, written by someone who spent a long time
working in the heart of their security department. It is all up to date as
of today, but who knows what the future holds, right? The best I can tell
you is, if you don't believe me, go apply for a job there yourself and find
out. They hire 18 and above for the security dept. And good news - Target
policy actually has more rules *preventing* their security from being able
to stop you than the other way around. The odds are highly stacked in favor
of thieves who are well-informed, as you are about to be. Gods bless
wrongful-arrest lawsuits and the fear they have inspired in Corporate
America. Reap, my friends! Reap!

So why give them up when I used to be their loyal watchdog? Eh. They
never knew the reason I was so good at catching thieves was because I used
to be one myself. Talk about reverting to type now, huh? I actually
started writing this as a book to try to publish with an alternative
company, but didn't want to deprive the young and bold but short of pocket
money from this valued information. In the spirit of sharing knowledge for
the sake of everyone's betterment, I'm offering this up for free, and just
hope no one will alter it in any way or try to claim it as their own. So,
fly free, my beautiful tutorial! Enlighten the masses!

Anyways, enough intro, on to the meat. I'll take you through all of Target's procedures, physical security, everything, and the ways you can go about circumventing and defeating all of them to the best of your ability.

By the way - I'll use the terms Target and SuperTarget interchangeably. The only difference between the two is that SuperTargets are newer, tend to have better equipment, and have a grocery section. Onward!

********** The People **********

The first line of defense in any Target is its Asset Protection Department,
or "AP" for short. You may have heard someone in the store calling "AP"
over the radios all employees carry. This is the security department,
usually called loss prevention at other stores. Every AP dept. has a few
levels of employees. The bottom rung is the Target Protection Specialist,
or TPS. These are the men and women in tan shirts and black pants, carrying
handcuffs and radios on their belts. They patrol the stores, and by policy
are supposed to spend most of their time at the front register lanes unless
something else requires their attention. The main portion of their job is
watching people checking out to see if any items have been left in the cart
"by accident", and politely reminding them to pay for it. TPS's get quota'd
on these items, so it's important they catch as many as possible. They
watch the doors for suspicious looking people coming in, and assist with any
emergencies, apprehensions, or anything else that may come up. But, due to
their lack of rank, *TPS's cannot arrest anyone on their own*!

I repeat, a TPS cannot stop you from leaving the store with stolen goods. They can
scare the crap out of you, and check your receipts, and if they're feeling
bold they can even request the stolen merchandise back. (That's against
Target policy, though. No one is *ever* supposed to be accused of stealing.
It hurts customers' feelings.)

Next up the ladder are the Asset Protection Specialists, or APS's. These
are the undercovers of the store, and believe me when I say that these folks
are on the ball. Anyone not dedicated to their job won't last very long in
this line of work. They patrol the store in plain clothes, carrying a
hidden walkie-talkie (usually in a purse for the ladies, or in a pocket or
clipped to the back of the pants for guys, with the shirt covering it).
They might sit in the office and watch cameras instead, but they're
encouraged to stay on the floor. A good way to Spot-the-APS is to look for
someone dashing around to endcaps, ducking down and then moving quickly away
to act nonchalant. Or just look to see if the rectangle-shape of the radio
is poking through the back of their shirt where it's hidden. (P.S. - An
endcap is just the Target term for the end of an aisle. All of Target's
endcaps are perforated, partly for hanging hooks, but mostly so AP can hide
and look through the holes to watch you steal. It's very hard to see
someone hiding behind the endcaps, so be careful and listen closely for
shifting and breathing.) APS's can arrest people all on their own, with or
without backup, although if they're worried you might fight they will have a
TPS, another APS, or enthusiastic regular employees ready to jump on you,
too. Remember, an APS doesn't have to win the fight with you. They just
have to slow you down long enough for everyone else to catch up. However,
if you physically resist they are legally allowed to drop you, using minimal
violence of course, and cuff you.

The manager of the AP dept is called an Asset Protection Team Leader, or
APTL. They usually spend more time researching employee theft than
patrolling the floor, looking over cash register reports and so on. Many
APTL's will not spend a lot of time in their personal store, traveling
around to assist at other stores and leaving the APS's in charge. They
essentially have the same powers as an APS, they're just way more
experienced at it. Above them are the District and Regional APTL's, so on
up the chain. These bigwigs usually never go to a store unless there's some
major booster making the rounds and they're trying to set a trap for them.
They're kind of like Target's personal shoplifter SWAT team, but without the
guns or cool outfits.

Something to keep in mind: every other employee in the store really wants
to be in AP. AP is the coolest job in the store to have, and its members
are constantly getting asked by regular employees if they can apply. What
this means for you is that every other employee in the store is eager to
prove that they can catch thieves too, so don't relax just because they're
wearing red and khaki. Regular employees will go out of their way to alert
AP to your presence and follow you around. However, if the red-shirts try
to stop you leaving the store, breeze on by. They have no legal powers, and
cannot arrest you.

********** The Electronics **********

Okay, on to the electronic security. You've no doubt noticed the hundreds
of black plastic camera domes mounted in the ceiling of your local Target.
Well, just as you suspected, quite a few of these are fake. But several
dozen of them are not. Every Target store has a "camera placement plan"
they follow, which may vary slightly from store to store, but generally
follows similar guidelines. Most real cameras will be placed over
high-theft item areas, such as Electronic Goods, the Pharmacy, Automotive,
and so on. There is literally a camera mounted over every single register
in the store, pointing down to watch transactions. There are *no* cameras
in the Grocery section of SuperTargets (but there are fake domes). The
closer you are to the outer wall of the Grocery, the farther you are from
any real cameras. Along the back wall of most stores is the Domestics and
Furniture sections. . .these usually have no real cameras, either, although
fake domes are spaced every other aisle. And, of course, it is illegal for
Target to place cameras in the bathroom, or near enough to the open-ceiling
dressing rooms to see in.

Like I said, it may vary between stores, but here are typically where all
the movable, zoomable, real cameras are:
- Over the Electronics checkout
- One at each end of the front lane registers
- Near the Automotive section (back corner of the store)
- If the store has two sets of doors (SuperTargets), there will be one
above each of the front corners of the building, for scanning the parking
lots
- One at the back of the building, near the rear loading docks
- Usually in the middle of the Clothing sections, but far enough away from
the dressing rooms
- Possibly right over the Pharmacy section, or nearby
- Right near the Guest Service desk, usually able to see the Portrait
Studio too in SuperTargets
- Above the wall-rack that divides the Men's and Women's Clothing sections

Also, the fixed, non-movable (and often black and white) cameras are
usually mounted:
- Near razors and razor blades
- Near any medicines commonly stolen by junkies
- Pointing at an angle at the incoming and outgoing doors, to catch face
shots of thieves as they enter or exit. After my term of employment, they
seem to have installed a small dome right at the exit doors themselves, at
about head height. I do not know if this is real or not, but probably is,
as face shots were a major concern, and the higher cameras would usually
only give fuzzy pictures at best.
- Over various aisles near the Electronics section, with computers, games,
stereos, etc.
- Over auto radar detectors
- Over GPS units in the camping section
- *Definitely* over every single register, even in the Deli, Bakery,
Starbucks and Pharmacy
- Over the jewelry counter

A lot of the real ones have been in use for a long time, and have larger
plastic domes. The newer fake ones are smaller, but the older, bigger ones
don't get taken out and replaced to match because who wants the hassle,
right? Don't go strictly by this, because you never know. But it's a good
guideline.

All the cameras are routed back to the AP Office, which is always somewhere
near the front of the store. At Targets, it's generally right next to the
Guest Service desk, behind an "Employees Only" door with a peephole in it.
At SuperTargets, it will be through some swinging doors at the front, and
then probably right there in a hallway, same kind of door with the peephole.

The doors are almost always locked, even when people are inside. Inside,
there will be a room set up with several monitors, usually about 6 to 10,
which are all connected through multiplexers to VCRs. On one wall will be
shelves and shelves full of tapes, usually labeled something like, "1A, 1B,
1C, 1D, 2A, 2B. . ." and so on. The number is usually the date of whichever
month you're in. The tapes get reused every month, so on the first the "1"
set is used again, and so on. This means unless they saved footage of you,
if you didn't attract any camera attention before, next month that tape will
have been recorded over. The A, B, C, D means the shift the tape was used
for, morning, afternoon, evening and overnight. And a tape log on a
clipboard is kept in the office to tell which tapes were used when, and what
time they started and finished.

So anyways, an AP can sit at the monitors and control the cameras using an
old-style joystick switch, or a more modern sort of trackball. They can
punch up any camera in the store on any monitor, although usually only about
nine or ten will be able to move. The rest are fixed, and are most likely
being recorded on a three-second skip. This means only every third second
gets recorded (to save tape space), which aids thieves since it makes it
hard to review and see quick motions. Sometimes thieves appear on an aisle,
and a moment later seem to just vanish without doing anything. Of course,
watching the cameras in real-time doesn't have the three-second skip. But
if they have to go back and watch the tape again to see if you really did do
what they thought you did, they have to worry about missing it if you moved
too fast.

The cameras they *can* move are top notch. They can often zoom in so close
that they can read information right off your driver's license all the way
from the ceiling. (If it's held still.) One of the big things AP has to
get is face shots. They depend on being able to say, Yep, that's the guy.
I've got his face on camera right here. So APs become very good at tracking
moving people and objects, and at switching quickly to other cameras for a
better view. If you spend too much time wandering in a spot where there are
no good cameras, or no cameras at all, they'll have to deploy from the
office and watch you on foot. This can be good for you, as it heightens the
chances that they'll miss something important. However, an APS can come out
and follow you while a TPS watches you on camera. If the TPS sees you do
something, and the APS doesn't, APSs are *not* supposed to accept this as
proof, but many often do. Of course, it's the APSs legal fault if the TPS
was wrong.


One of the biggest ways to get caught easily is to *look directly at the
cameras*. I know this sounds stupid, and like common sense, but you would
not believe how many nervous amateurs will glance repeatedly, or just boldly
stare at the dome right above them, giving AP a perfect chance for a face
shot and clear view of whatever they're stealing. Keep your eyes down, boy.

Just assume the camera is real, and that you should be hiding your hand
movements anyways. (Except in Grocery, heh.) If you want to scope out a
camera, do it from a long way off, and do not tilt your head or eyes up.
Use your peripherals. And trust me - you *cannot* see through the domes to
tell if it's pointed at you. They're double-layered to prevent this. And
an upturned face is *very* easy to see in a camera, even on one of the
smaller monitors, and will instantly attract attention.

Recently Target began outfitting all its stores with a system called
"Loronix", which operates on digital recording in a computer instead of
tapes. It's a big time-saver for AP, because they can just punch in a time,
date and camera, and the footage will come up instantly, instead of having
to hunt and peck through hundreds of tapes. Most of the cameras hooked up
to it are fixed cameras, though, and still on the three-second skip. All of
the register cameras will be on Loronix. They can also save the little
movie files to disk, and give these disks to the police as evidence,
playable on any computer.

Also, Target camera monitors can be quickly punched up to display whatever
current transaction is occurring at a certain register, *as the employee is
ringing up the items*, to see if you're price-tag-switching or
short-changing the cashier. Be wary.

We'll touch back on cameras with the procedures. . .for now, on to the EAS
tags!
Every Target store has a set of EAS stands at the front doors, and all
valuable merchandise (according to weekly store plans) is tagged with EAS
stickers. These are square, white stickers with bar codes printed across
them, which you've probably seen before. (The bar code is to help guests
believe it's just for price scanning, not that Target doesn't trust them.)
Just pick up a popular CD or DVD at Target, and one will probably be stuck
to the back. They're tiny antennas of a sort (and forgive me if I don't
know the electronics here - please, no techno-geniuses flaming me for
mis-assuming how these work) that will trigger the EAS stand by radio
frequencies. The stands constantly generate them, and the sticker passing
through will interrupt them, setting off the alarm. (Coincidentally, the
numbers printed on the sticker barcode are the actual frequency they're
working on.) When items are "deactivated" at checkout, they pass the
sticker over a CheckPoint pad that shuts them off. There is one of these
pads below the counter of almost every register, so if you can manage to
palm an item across it without employees noticing, you can deactivate the
sticker.

Supposedly, according to the online company tech specs, the
Checkpoints are supposed to work up to around a foot or so above the actual
pad. Sometimes crooked AP will swipe whole rolls of these stickers across
the deactivator pad, rendering them useless before they're placed on
products. A lot of other things set off the stands too - cell phones,
electronic keycards, anything that might interfere with the frequency. You
might even consider stealing a sticker and hiding it inside your wallet,
cell phone, etc. just so if there's a TPS at the front checking receipts,
you can wave your wallet or phone through and show that it's the culprit,
not the DVD in your pants with the sticker removed. TPS's can not
thoroughly search you, and if you set off the alarm and just keep on
walking, unless an APS was about to arrest you anyways, a TPS can shout all
they want but not stop you.

These stickers can be peeled off pretty easily, and you can recognize them
also by the pink underside with the square-loop-whirl of metal that makes
the antenna. Of course, AP watches for people picking at packages and
stickers, so hide your motion as much as you can, or just get rid of the
package entirely during a moment you're out of camera view. And be careful
- sometimes AP hides the stickers loose *inside* boxes, or they come
pre-packaged that way, so you don't even know one's in there. The new rolls
of stickers are kept locked up in the AP office until about once a week,
when someone will go sticker all the new items on the shelves.

Supposedly thieves have tried shielding the insides of backpacks with
aluminum foil to prevent the tags from setting off the stands, but I can't
tell you if this works for real or not. You might experiment by stealing
just a sticker, taking it home, wrapping it in aluminum foil and hiding it
inside your shoe or underwear or somewhere else not obvious, then going back
to see if it sets off the alarm. If not, cool, break out that Reynold's
Wrap and load up, man.

Of lesser note in AP electronics is the AP computer, which keeps e-mail
contact on a private intranet between all the stores, and houses files on
every attempted and successful criminal act caught in the store. If any AP
members witness suspicious activity, they will record their findings after
the fact in the computer, and submit this info by e-mail to all the other
local stores, warning them of potential thieves. (They also call a few
local stores by phone if they scare off a thief and think they may be
heading to another one nearby.) In these files go as much physical
description as possible (age, weight, race, clothing), what the thief did,
the make/model and license plate of a car if obtained, and whether or not
they have good camera footage and face shots.

If you're really desperate and need to steal whatever it is that day, drive about an hour away and find another one. Typically they only call stores within a few miles, or within the same general city. The farther you go, the less chance they've been
warned. They also may store digital camera mug shots of arrested thieves in
the computer (some less advanced stores still have Polaroids). Despite what
a dumb cop may bold-face-lie to you, Target does *not* have facial
recognition software in their cameras. Your picture is just for future
reference, and the cameras will not track you by recognizing your picture.
I actually had a cop tell a guy this once, and I was so disgusted I almost
told the thief the truth instead. I mean, really. The APTL also uses the
computer to track employee theft patterns and register shortages.

Also, to touch briefly on communications - APs keep in touch with each
other by radio, and occasionally phone. AP office numbers are almost always
a 209, or 3209 extension inside the building. Every store employee has a
walkie talkie with two channels on it. Channel One is for general calls and
quick conversations, and Channel Two is for more private talk when employees
need to explain something in detail and don't want to block out One for
everyone else. Only on AP walkie talkies is a third channel, private for AP
use. Frequently if an employee spots a potential crime in progress, you may
hear the radios crackle, "AP, go to two please, AP, go to two". Once on
Channel Two, the employee may relate what they are seeing to the responding
AP member. In theory, they try to be private, but other dumb employees will
also switch to Two, wanting to listen to the action. This helps thieves who
might overhear the eavesdropping employee, and realize they're the ones
being talked about.

If a TPS sees something happening and wants to contact their APS, they will
call "AP, go to three, please, AP, go to three", or the name of the person,
i.e. "Bob, go to three please". If you ever hear the call to go to three,
think twice about what you're doing, because you may have been spotted. If
the APS is out on the floor and following someone, they leave their radio on
Three, so no normal store announcements will come out of it. If a TPS wants
to reach them then, they will go to Three on their own radio, blow gently
for a moment, and wait for the APS to respond. On the APS end, it produces
a soft static crackle, and if they can, the APS will get alone and call
back. Frequently they can't because it would alert someone they're already
following. A lot of times the TPS blows too hard, so if you're on an aisle
and think you're alone, and you suddenly hear a crackling/blowing noise
coming from an endcap, drop what you're doing and leave. You're probably
already screwed.

Some stores try to be clever and use other code names for AP, like
"Hardware 4" or Mr. Something-or-other, to keep from alerting thieves that
anything's wrong.

All Target stores also have emergency codes that go over the radio and
store speaker system. These are Red, Green and Yellow. Red is for fires,
Green is for medical emergencies, and Yellow is for parents who've lost
their children. Codes Red and Green will be announced three times in
succession, with a location of where employees should respond to. Yellow
causes all employees to stop, man every door in the store, and watch for
potential kidnappers, while the other employees quickly search the store for
the lost child. (A child found without a parent is not a Code Yellow, the
store will just page the parents' name over the announcer.) These codes are
useful for opportunity thieves, because unless a violent crime is about to
happen, AP is required to respond to safety issues before theft ones. A lot
of thieves will have a friend cause a fake "accident" on one side of the
store to draw AP away from the side they're about to steal on. Of course,
there may be enough AP members in-store to go around that day, so don't
count on them all being away if they already know you're trying to steal.
It's best if they have no idea you were about to do anything. Hang out in a
totally different area, someplace harmless, like Office supplies. It's
right next to Electronics, usually, so if you suddenly hear "Code Green,
Grocery" over the intercom, you can instantly grab your stuff from
Electronics and head out the door. This works best at SuperTargets, as the
Electronics section is always right in front of the Blue Doors, while
Grocery is all the way down the other side at the Green doors.

(P.S. They're called the Blue and Green doors because that's what color
they're painted on *all* SuperTargets.)

And if you do decide to ever work with an accomplice - come in separate
cars. Don't walk into the store together and then split up. AP will start
watching you. And if you do the whole "accident" gag, please make sure it's
plausible. The store will try to get you to show personal information for
an accident report, in case you try to sue later and lie about how badly you
were hurt. You can refuse to stay for this. Also - don't make your
accident *so* bad that they immediately call an ambulance. You don't want
to have to pay a few hundred in hospital bills just because you're a method
actor, and your friend wanted a $20 DVD. The best course is probably to
fake a fainting spell, and let an employee "wake" you back up. Stay out
long enough to hear the Code Green being called, slowly wake up when the
crowd arrives, and assure everyone you're okay, just a little dizzy, could I
please have some water, but no, I don't think anything is seriously wrong.
No, no ambulances. :)

One more thing on communications - if you're trying something thieve-y at
the registers, and your cashier suddenly gets a call on their phone, they've
probably been warned you're up to something. AP does this all the time. If
you back out and go to another register and *they* get a call? Leave. Just
go. You're probably not going to make it out of the store with whatever
you're trying.

********** On With The Show ***********

Now down to brass tacks. What do you do when you want to steal from
Target? How do you get away with it?

It starts all the way out in the parking lot, when you first arrive. If
you can, come to the store on foot. Having a car really only gives them
another way to track you, by your license plate. Second to that, park in
another lot nearby and walk over, out of view of the Target. Lastly, park
as far back as you can in the Target lot, but not so far that there are
absolutely no other cars within 50 feet of you. The farther away you are,
though, the harder it is for them to get your plate when you're leaving in a
hurry. The cameras do zoom, but over distance the plate will fuzz out, and
it's hard to track a rapidly moving vehicle. Come in to the store at a
normal, casual walking pace, paying no attention to other people around you,
cameras, anything but being a normal shopper. Way too many thieves come in
fast, hoping to escape notice and be out before anyone knows they were
there, but more often this attracts attention instead.

When you first walk in the store, pay no attention to any tan-uniformed
people you see. The TPSs should not frighten innocent people, and will not
pay attention to you if you don't seem to notice them. Do *not* try to be
clever and glance out of the corner of your eye at them. This is more
suspicious then just giving them a polite smile and walking past.

AP personnel are programmed to watch for behaviors, not stereotypes.
(Seriously - despite what thieves may think, they *don't care* that you're
black, or young, or have three pounds of metal in your face. They saw you
glancing at cameras and opening that package, you dope. *That's* why they
arrested you.) Of course, if you're dressed all raggedy and are obviously
in need of a fix, they're probably going to watch you anyways. It helps to
be neatly dressed, obviously well-behaved (Goofus all you want at home, but
be Gallant in the store), and to be with another person. Single males who
walk in quickly, take a handbasket and go straight to a section or float
around a general area without actually *shopping* are instantly watched.
Having a shopping cart means you're planning to spend more time in the
store. Having a cart and your girlfriend with you means you're probably not
thinking about stealing.

If you really want to mess them up? Spend a half hour, or a whole hour,
slowly going up and down the aisles in Grocery and doing a full cart of
shopping. They'll give up, if they suspected you at all. Go and get that
CD you wanted as an afterthought, pull up to a front lane full of people,
pick up the CD, abandon your cart, and walk right out the front doors. (Try
to go to a door without a TPS guarding it, of course.) It takes time, but
they'll never see it coming. And it's not like *you* have to reshelve all
that stuff.

Do *not* load up your cart full of expensive stuff no one in their right
mind would buy all at once. Even non-AP employees will know to call you in
if they see a cart like that. Too many thieves will stack DVD players in a
cart, and then cruise up and down the front aisles, trying to see which door
is unguarded. This only gives AP more time to spot you, and a TPS *can*
stop you at the door if they clearly saw you walk right past the registers
without paying for a cart full of stuff. If you don't have a receipt, they
can hold you there until you either abandon the cart and leave, or go back
to pay. Don't try the "oh, me, I can't find this darn receipt in my big ol'
purse" thing. If you leave the cart and walk quickly out, the TPS will not
stop you. They do not care, they have the merchandise. You get away to
steal another day. Also, for a TPS, a big cart full of expensive stuff that
they prevented from being stolen is a *big* bonus in their quotas. They
don't get extra pay, but it's major kudos for stopping a high theft amount.
They will still put a report in the computer, and probably try to find tape
of you and record your car as you drive away, but they will never stop you
from leaving empty-handed.

Okay, so you've found a smaller item that you want, say a DVD. Browse
around first. Do not walk straight in, grab the one you want, and head for
the back of the store. Look through several, even read the back of the one
you want, put it back, look at another, check how much money you have in
your wallet, then slowly appear to decide on your target. This goes for
most other items, too. If you can, have a basket full of other items, too,
that you appeared to really shop for. Don't just toss random stuff in your
cart as props. Honestly shop, like you normally would. Wait until you're
shopping through an empty part of the store, and either remove the sticker
or open the package as quickly and quietly as you can. If you know there's
a camera dome nearby, keep your body hunched over the item, your back to the
dome, and move your arms as little as possible. It's all in the hands now.
A long range camera might still see you from far away, so keep your body as
close to the shelf as possible, too. Some thieves will reach back in
between other boxes on a shelf and open the wrapper back there, so no
cameras can see what they're doing (although they will probably still see
that DVD coming back out and going in your pocket). If someone suddenly
comes on to the aisle, don't freeze, don't look, just let go and walk away.
Continue shopping if you like, but remember, they will *never*, ever arrest
you for attempted theft. You have to actually leave the store with items on
you to be arrested. It's a universal law of shoplifting.

A good place to go for opening packages might be the middle of the clothing
section. . .the racks are just below head height, so anyone sneaking up on
you will make themselves very conspicuous if they have to start ducking and
crouching. If you hold the item in between two shirts hanging on a display,
it will make it almost impossible for the cameras to see what you're doing
(and be wary, they also do sometimes put moving cameras in the Clothing
section).

Say you do everything right, no one shows up. . .put the item somewhere it
won't leave a visible bulge under your clothes. Light jackets with interior
pockets sewn in them are great for this. Even if your jacket doesn't have
one, just get a piece of matching-color cloth in a big square, and sew three
sides of it to the inside of your jacket liner, under your arm, to make a
shoplifting pocket. If your jacket has a lining, you could even just make a
wide horizontal slit and drop things into it. This is great when you have
something in hand, because you can lean over with the other hand and pretend
to be getting something off a low shelf, which causes that side of your
jacket to hang down, and your stealing hand slips the item smoothly into
your jacket, while you still appear to only be browsing. This is better
done with leather jackets and things that won't show an outline of the item
easily. I used to shoplift right in front of cameras in my younger days by
taking stuff to a magazine section, turning my back to the camera and
leaning sideways against the shelf. My outer hand would be holding up a
magazine to read while my shelf-side hand would be opening the package. My
body, to the camera, did not appear to be moving at all, because I only
moved my hand and not my arm. I would then smoothly slip the item into a
secret pocket in my jacket, and continue reading, folding the package very
small and hiding it behind the other magazines on the upper racks when I
picked up a different one to "read". Of course, the magazine section in
Target has several cameras nearby, since it's right in Electronics, so you
may have to find somewhere else to lean.

What if it's warmer weather, and you can't wear a jacket? Target AP will
watch for non-seasonal clothing, i.e. people wearing too many layers in
blazing heat, or not wearing a jacket at all in the winter. A very common
(and surprisingly easy to get away with) theft is to walk in without a
jacket, take one of the $100+ leather ones, slip it on, and walk right back
out. Target will often put EAS stickers in their jackets, but it is almost
always midway up the inside of the sleeve, probably the left one. Feel
inside the sleeve for something square and hard, peel it out, wad it up,
throw it away, and you can walk out without any alarm. If you're trying to
steal in shorts and a t-shirt during the summer, it becomes trickier to hide
things under your clothes. For guys and girls, try to slip things down the
front of your underwear. I know it feels weird, and try not to walk funny,
but it's the only place anything more than a few inches across will probably
not show up. Don't just put it in your pants - it'll go straight down the
leg and fall out. You may even want to sew a special pocket inside there,
just for shoplifting. Some thieves will put on a pair of baggy exercise
pants underneath their real pants, and strap them off above the knee with
rubber bands or string to things can be dropped down the pants safely and
won't fall out. A boxer short version of this can be made for summer days.
Just put on your boxers, tie them off near the end around your thigh, and
put on your real shorts over them. And a note for you schoolkids: backpacks
and bags are not a good idea (even foil-lined ones for you experimenters).
Any kind of bag will stand out and you will be watched until you leave the
store. Ladies who carry purses are lucky. . .it's often very difficult for
AP to establish that a lady actually put something in her purse, especially
if her back was to the camera.

A sure-fire way to guarantee messing up AP's strategy at any time is to
duck into a bathroom or the dressing rooms in Clothing. Remember - you can
cross the registers to the bathrooms at the front with stuff inside your
clothing, because *it's not theft until you leave the store*. Literally.
If AP sees you heading that way, they may send a TPS to tell people the
restroom is closed, and force you back into the store. There is also a
restroom at the Pharmacy, though, and chances are they won't beat you there
first. If you do get in, though, head for a stall and stay there for a few
minutes. A TPS or APS may follow you in, pretend to use the restroom, or
probably just wash their hands (so they can immediately follow you back
out). The restroom is not a good idea if you have a package you want to
open, just if you've already got something hidden. Open it on the floor,
hide it, go to the bathroom. Too many times APs will break the rules, and
follow you in to the bathroom. Then they will pretend to leave by opening
the door and letting it shut, waiting silently. You, being previously
unaware, would then proceed to loudly open your package, thinking you're
alone, at which point the AP will sneak over to the stall, whip the door
open and tell you to give it up and get the hell out of their store. A good
hard yank will pop open a restroom stall, and they don't care if your pants
are down. This is true even if you're a little kid, because children will
almost always take toys and stuff to the bathrooms and think they're safe in
there.

Of course, if they arrest you, you know now Target policy and can
claim that they made illegal surveillance of you while in a private area.
Under normal circumstances, if an AP is following all the rules, they will
wait until you come out, send in someone to check for the stolen items you
may have dumped or for empty packages in the toilets, paper holders, or
trash, and then try to establish if you still have the item hidden on you or
not. Many times this will instantly break their chain of surveillance and
they will have to let you go. Also, if you use the Pharmacy bathroom and
dump the wrapper in the trash, you will have a few moments to get to the
doors while a TPS or APS will have to verify that the wrapper is there, and
radio to the person making the apprehension. However, this still
constitutes breaking observation, and they will probably just try to scare
you by manning the front doors. Under very rare conditions they can call a
DAPTL and get permission to make a bathroom apprehension, but this is almost
never allowed. Another thing to consider - the bathrooms in SuperTargets
are always right next to an Employees only door, usually right in front of
their break room. Come back out, and if no one's nearby, you could duck
right in there and run for the Employee entrance door. Careful, though, as
sometimes AP will hide right behind that first door and watch through the
window to see when you come out of the bathroom.

The same goes for ducking into the changing rooms. Hide an item like a DVD
inside a folded up pair of pants, request an item count tag from the
attendant at the changing rooms (if they're there) and walk inside. AP
cannot watch you from cameras while you're in there, and no cameras are near
enough to see in. This is law. They can try to get in another booth next
to yours and listen for packages opening, then find the empty package after
you leave. And changing attendants will often call AP if they think someone
is acting suspicious, or if they hear wrappers being torn. If an AP member
ever does arrest you after you entered the bathroom, they are probably
counting on the fact that you will be scared, and won't know that they can't
do it. They will alter their report to say that you unconcealed the stolen
items and reconcealed them again back out in the store after you left the
bathroom, which is enough to arrest you on. (Of course, if you really do
take the stuff out and then hide it again after you leave the bathroom, you
deserve to be arrested.) Many, many times APs of all levels will fudge
their reports to hide small mistakes they made or rules they overlooked for
the sake of arresting someone they were sure was guilty, and other AP
members will probably cover for them, for the greater good. Of course, they
risk arresting someone with nothing on them, which is very bad for an AP, or
of a fellow team member later ratting them out to an APTL, but chances are
they'll get away with it, especially if they're working alone that day.

********** The Ties That Bind **********

Now to touch more directly on AP rules. These explain why the bathroom
trick works. An APS has many rules about when they specifically *cannot*
make an apprehension (arrest you). More so, as I said in the intro, than
they do about when they *can* arrest you. The odds are *always* stacked in
an intelligent thief's favor, if they know the store policies. The stores
are too afraid of lawsuits, and let APs know they may be fired for even only
one false arrest, even after years of good service. They have several steps
they have to acquire during watching you that if they lose even one of, they
may not be able to make the arrest.

First, they must observe you enter the area without the about-to-be-stolen
merchandise. This rule is the most often overlooked by APSs, because
chances are they won't know you're a thief until you're stealing something.

Second, they have to see you select the merchandise from the shelf or
display. They can't risk arresting you for stuff you brought in to the
store on your own.

Third, they have to actually see you conceal the merchandise. They are
allowed leeway here, because you may have your back to them, but if they see
you pick up an item, fiddle with the wrapper, and suddenly the empty
wrapper's dropped on the shelf and the item has disappeared, they can make
"reasonable assumptions" that you have it hidden on you. Again, someone
watching on camera may be able to record you clearly hiding the item, and if
it's a fellow APS, the APS on the floor will probably be okay in trusting
their judgment. If it's a TPS on camera, the APS is not supposed to take
their word on it, but still can if they're willing to risk accepting the
legal blame and losing their job if they're wrong.

Fourth, and most importantly, the APS then has to *maintain* observation of
you so well that there is *no* reasonable doubt you still have the item on
you. This is the hardest bit of any surveillance, because a thief with an
item hidden knows they're a time bomb. The thief will start moving more
quickly, trying to find a safe way out, ducking around aisles, making it
harder for the APS to follow them. This is always a good idea for thieves.
Moving quickly, weaving, makes it harder for visual contact to be
maintained, and for cameras to follow you. A lot of times a thief good at
doubling back and weaving may lose the entire AP dept, and it won't be until
later when the tapes are reviewed that they see the thief leaving the store.

This gives you every opportunity to dump the stuff if you feel unsafe, and
still walk out a free person.

Fifth and last, you then have to actually walk through the doors with the
item still on you. All SuperTargets have double doors, and AP plays on
this. They will always take you as soon as you pass the first set of doors,
inside the foyer. If you haven't left the store with stolen goods, it isn't
theft yet, no crime has occurred. APS's are always asked, "Did you have
your Five Steps?" to determine if they actually followed the rules. There
are lots of mitigating circumstances where they can bend the rules, but
overall these ties bind them very tightly, and help you out enormously.

For instance - if you place a large box under your shirt that's so obvious
anyone can see the corners poking out, and the APS loses you during Step
Four, but finds you again right at the doors, still poking out squarely,
they can act on reasonable assumption that you are still stealing. Or if
you clearly are carrying the item in your hand, not concealing it at all,
they can ignore that rule too.

What this also means is that at any time, if you know that you are being
watched, or even suspect it, you don't have to hide anything. You could
walk right up to the APS, and remove every item from your jacket, hand it to
them, smile and walk out the door. There's nothing they can do.
Theoretically, you could even stop at the stands, before you leave, and drop
everything on the floor right there, wave to the camera, and go. But when
you get near the doors, it'll be hard to prove you weren't intending to
leave, so best to do it a ways back.

To help your case if you do get away, try to wear glasses, a hat, and
clothing you never intend to wear again. Alter your appearance as much as
possible. Die your hair, even. Too many thieves get recognized by their
signature clothing, and when you come back to steal the second time and get
caught, they'll remember the first time.

********** The Rundown **********

So let's say you've decided to go for it anyways. You know you're being
watched, but you really want that item tucked away in your jacket. You've
weaved and moved, but you're not sure if you lost them or not. You're near
the front doors, and you want to act casual, but suddenly one of several
things can go wrong.

There may be a TPS blocking your way out. Often, if they think you'll
spook and give up, a TPS may just walk nearby you while you're still in the
store, glancing very obviously in your direction and making a few more
passes as you continue. If a TPS is handling it, an APS may not even be on
duty. Remember, a TPS can only scare you, they can't stop you. If you go
all the way, they may stand right in front of the exit doors. If you cross
to the other doors, they'll cross with you, either pretending not to notice
you or staring blatantly at you. If this happens, head back out into the
store. Get to a safe distance, and see if the TPS is following you. Lead
them to the back of the store, and as fast as you can, don't worry about
other customers, sprint for the front. Blast out the doors, and away. You
never have to shop there again, you know. Or just quickly and casually
weave until the front doors are open, then walk quickly out. They cannot
stop you.

You may not see anyone, but an APS may be waiting nearby for you to head
out the doors. They will then run quietly up behind you, whip out their
orange security badge, and shout, "Target Security!" or "Asset Protection!"
or any combination of these with "Freeze!" They have to announce who they
are, otherwise you can claim later you thought you were being assaulted by a
stranger. They won't always pull out their badge, a verbal warning is
legally enough. Be ready if you think you've outrun them, too. . .many
times a lone APS will enlist burly, video-game-generation-violent store
employees to wait outside the doors and trap you. These guys don't know the
rules as well, and may just try to beat you into the ground instead of just
subduing you.

There's also a very important rule that Target thieves need to know - the
Sidewalk rule. If you can make it past the sidewalk, Target is supposed to
let you go. They can't risk the liability of chasing you into traffic and
getting you hurt or killed by a car. Of course, if an APS has their arms
around you, and you drag them past the sidewalk, you've just waived your
right to the Rule. It's all just part of the fight now. This is another
reason to be nervous of normal, non-AP employees. They may not know the
Rule, and drag you back from the lot if they can catch you, and AP will
probably bend the rules and fudge reports to cover. I witnessed it a few
times.

If you do get jumped by an APS at the door, it's best to assume there's
backup coming. A TPS has to maintain camera footage of the actual
apprehension starting, but the instant the APS makes contact with the thief,
the TPS will sprint out to help. This is why the AP office is at the front,
and exactly between both sets of front doors. Other employees and even
customers will often run over to help. If you are going to do anything
violent to get free, do it as soon as you know you're being attacked.
Remember, the second doors will slow you down, no matter how fast you're
moving. An APS will run around in front of you, so if you do try to run, it
will probably be back into the store, where they can control you. APSs come
in all shapes and sizes, too, from tiny little women to massive,
bodybuilding men. And don't just assume that since they're small, you can
overpower them. Most of the tiny women I knew at Target could beat the hell
out of men twice their size in a few seconds. Target security are not lax
in their fight training. They are not allowed to use their radios,
handcuffs or anything else as weapons. They are not supposed to strike you,
only subdue you by grappling, but if you start swinging punches, they
probably will too, and then you have no legal excuse. You started it, and
they *will* have tape to prove it. (Remember those fixed cameras at the
front doors?) Other than that, all bets are off, and chances are no one
will care if you sustain extra bruises during your capture.

Here's a rule I would not advise you to use unless you're absolutely
desperate: Target policy forbids AP from attempting to arrest you, or even
coming near you, if you have a weapon. If at some point, while you're in
the store, you very clearly display a knife or gun to the cameras, they will
back off, and attempt to spook you into leaving. APSs will probably start
making themselves very obvious to you, not even trying to hide anymore, just
glaring as they walk past. *****HOWEVER*****. The instant they know you
have a weapon, and are apparently thinking about needing it to get out, they
may call the cops to provide backup. They will most certainly report you to
the police even if you do leave without stealing, especially if they get
your license plate. I would say that a smart thief should *NEVER* carry a
weapon for something like shoplifting. It will go *way* harder for you if
you do get arrested, and if you know the rules about being able to walk away
whenever you want, it's just not worth it. When stealing from Target, you
are never going to end up in a life-or-death situation. Or even a
life-or-jail one, if you can just get yourself to dump and walk away. If
you do want to carry something, I'd suggest pepper spray, as it's
non-lethal, and many people would just happen to have it on them. You could
always claim you were panicked by the sudden shout and person barreling down
on you, and you just reacted and sprayed them. You always carry pepper
spray for self-defense, right?

Of course, as with every other rule, there's an exception. . .if an AP
member is absolutely *sure* you cannot get to your weapon before they can
drop you, they may risk their own life and try to arrest you. They will
probably receive a stern warning later, but it's their choice. But it's
very heavily pushed upon all APs that no item in the store is ever worth
anyone's life. Just let them go, get video footage, report it to the
police.

A good idea for any thief is to consider alternative exits. Every Target
store has several emergency exit doors located around the outer walls.
These doors always have a Detex unit panic bar attached to them, and the
double doors (mostly found in SuperTargets) will also have a knob-controlled
vertical locking bar. These doors are also all hooked into the Operator's
alarm panel in the recesses of the Employee Only area. To open a panic bar,
you need only to push on the arm, and the door will open, setting off a
blaringly loud alarm, so be ready to run. (Unless the batteries have run
down, in which case it might be almost silent - hey, it's really happened a
lot. You could also plausibly pick the main lock to open the latch, or use
a set of Detex keys to open the casing lock and pull out the battery if you
had time.) And there's a magnetic switch hooked to the top of the door
which sets off a small alarm at the Operator's desk to let them know the
door has been opened. They will immediately contact AP by radio if a Detex
door is opened, and let them know which one. On the double doors, you can
first turn the knob on the vertical bar, which will unlock it, then slam
open the panic bar and run out. Neither of these devices can ever actually
be really locked, because they're emergency exits. In a fire or disaster,
they can't count on being able to get a key to them, so *anyone*, at
*anytime*, has to be able to open them easily. This is very popular with
kids, who know the odds of AP catching them running out an emergency door
are slim. If you don't think you're being watched yet, you might even
release the locking bar first before you've taken anything, and then when
you've got the stolen goods, run at full speed, slamming open the Detex bar
and, simultaneously, the door, and sprinting away. AP might notice it's
unlocked, though, and set a trap for you by waiting right outside, or behind
nearby shelves. A lot of times fixed cameras are pointed right at these
doors because they're so popular with repeat boosters. (Oh, side note -
anyone who has been recognized, even vaguely, as having used the fire exits
to steal several times, even from different stores, will attract the special
attention of those RAPTLs and DAPTLs I mentioned earlier, the Target SWAT
team. They don't like fire exit boosters, and will specifically set traps
just for you, boyo.)

But, warning aside, they are a very good alternative when other doors seem
blocked. Many thieves will even have an accomplice waiting right outside
the emergency door in a car, so they can peel away. If AP sees a car on
camera waiting by an exit door, though, they may come out to speak to you or
call the police to shoo you away. Or just set traps for you. Anyways.
There is usually a door in the sports section of the store, near the Camping
Goods, right on an aisle. There are usually four hidden in Employee Only
areas at the back of the store. In Grocery where the long freezer walls
meet at the corner, there is a swinging door set. Go through these, and
just beyond should be another emergency exit door. The same goes if you're
along the back wall of the store, in the Domestics sections. There will be
a large set of swinging doors, charge through these, you should see straight
ahead of you a fire door. Also, if you follow the tall shelves of items in
the rear warehouse area of SuperTargets, it may look like you're heading
towards a dead end, but in between the last shelf aisles will be another
Detex door (with no locking bar!), and beyond that, in the employee
training/conference room, there will also be a non-bar Detex door. You risk
employees spotting you, of course, but unless they're ignorant of the rules
they shouldn't try to actually stop you, other than shouting "Hey!"


If you're really bold, you could even charge into the Employees Only
swinging doors at the front of the store (SuperTarget only), and towards the
Employee entrance door. (It will always be right by the Operator's desk,
and has EAS stands around it, because they don't trust employees, either.)
You'd probably have to run past several employees, and definitely right past
the AP office door, but once you're out, you're gone into the parking lot.

Of course, with all this excitement and bravery, there still comes the
gentler ways of getting out. AP, despite being well trained and on the
ball, is only human and cannot be everywhere. They probably only spot about
10% of the theft going on, and catch about 1%.

Many people will try just filling up a cart with whatever they want and
walking through the register lanes and right out the door. Out in the
parking lot, they can load up their car at leisure. (Not quite the same as
the cart-full-of-DVD-players I said earlier, this is just a cart full of
different, probably not too expensive items.) Someone may have a Target bag
from a previous purchase that still looks relatively new, pull it out of
their pocket in the store, load up, and walk out. Some people make a small
purchase, ask for a bag, and then head back into the store and load more
goods into it. And there's always the most common supermarket theft in the
world - eating candy out of the candy bins without paying for it, or "just
one or two" grapes from the shelf. I used to take great pleasure in
sneaking up on little fat kids stealing candy from the bins, coming right up
behind them, and saying, basso profundo, "You gonna pay for that?" Deer in
the headlights, every time.

********** When It All Comes Down **********

Uh oh. . .you made a bad mistake, and now you're in cuffs and being taken
to the Office to await your punishment. What do you do now?

Let's backtrack a moment and look at the theft you made, to see where we
can improve your chances. First - AP doesn't like to apprehend for items
under $20, because then they can really only warn you, take the stuff back,
put you in a report, take your picture and let you go. If you have a
one-dollar candy bar, you could probably walk right out the door waving it
over your head and no one would stop you. And I really mean $20. . .if
you're even half a buck under, they'll probably let you go. But Gods help
you if you're a penny over.

If you don't think your chances are good when you're being arrested (i.e.
the APS towers over you, biceps bulging), do not fight in *any* way. Calmly
hold up your hands, palms open, and state that you surrender. Lay down on
the floor with your hands behind your back if you want, and let them
peacefully cuff you. I guarantee, if you're calm and don't look like you'll
run, they won't even cuff you. They'll take you firmly by the arm to make
sure you can't get away, though. This is a time when some thieves might try
to suddenly attack the AP, break free and run back out the door, but the
police will then be after you for assault. Chances are they probably got
good enough footage of you to screw you over on that count, and there
probably won't be just one AP holding your arm, either. The more you
cooperate, the better they'll treat you.

If you were dumb enough to bring a weapon, and you're now cuffed and being
led away, clearly state, "I want you to know, I have a weapon, a (knife,
gun, etc.) in my (right pocket, holster, etc.)" Do *not* try to remove it,
as this might be taken as hostile action.

When you're taken to the Office, you will be on camera the whole time
you're in it. Don't try to make up any stories about AP beating you
severely (unless they really did), or sexually molesting you, because AP is
*very* good about getting everything on tape, and will be able to prove
quickly that you're a thief *and* a liar. They also always leave at least
one AP or store team member of the same sex as you in the office the whole
time, to act as a witness.

You will be sat down in a plastic chair, or in one of the new restraining
benches being installed in most Targets. These are metal benches with a
crossbar for attaching handcuffs, so they don't have to worry about you
running away until the cops get there. Here's an interesting secret - the
crossbar actually is made in two pieces, and screws together like a curtain
rod at the center. You can't see the seam because of a support, but the bar
can be unscrewed, and not only are you free then, you have a length of metal
pipe for a weapon. Of course, many AP people have realized this, and taken
the time to superglue it together. (And they will probably just have
attached a second set of cuffs to the chain on your cuffs, and that to the
bar, so even if you do get free, you're still cuffed behind your back. Not
a good situation for escape.)

Here's something to drill into your skull: please, *please* do not try the
"I have to go the bathroom" trick. Even if you really do have to go. AP is
not going to let you, no matter how much you whine. If they've been around,
they will probably tell you, "That's why the chair is plastic," or, "That's
why the bench has all those little holes in it." They're serious. Wet
yourself right there if you want. And don't try the "Owwwww, my handcuffs
are too tight, waaaah," thing. In a few minutes the police will be there
and will change out their handcuffs for AP's, so you can whine all you want
to them instead.

Now they move on to questioning you. They will need all the personal info
they can get from you for their reports. Name, age, ID if you've got it
(don't bring it if you're feeling rebellious). They will want to know why
you stole, and most of the time all they ever hear is "I don't know."
Unless you tried to beat them up, they will be very civil and polite to you,
and try to convince you to tell them more about what you were doing when you
tried to steal. A *very* common line from APSs and APTLs interviewing
thieves is, "Now we're going to try to establish your honesty, so I can tell
the cops you're dealing fair with us. It'll go better for you. Now, I know
everything you took. I know everything you did. And I want you to tell me,
in detail, what you did, to see how honest you're going to be with me."
They usually only use this line if they're missing some important gap in
their observation of you. They will also tend to sit you down and
immediately tell you, "I want everything you took on this desk right now.
Everything you were going to steal." If you're cuffed, they may have to
remove it for you. But it's definitely smart to obey them on this count at
least. . .they're right, the police will be searching you as soon as they
arrive, and it will be noted that you tried to lie about not having any
other stolen goods on you. However, if you *did* take stuff under $20, and
they haven't found it all, and you're pretty sure you're about to be let go,
you can risk bluffing it out and still get away with something for the day's
hassle.

Overall, if you just want to get the legal stuff done with quickly and
accept your punishment, I'd say cooperate completely. However, you are not
required to cooperate with Target in any way. You can just say, "I'm taking
my right to remain silent in advance," and then shut up until the cops get
there. It's probably better this way. The cops may submit all your
personal info back to Target later, but the less info they have on you, the
better your chances are for stealing in the future. Don't try to lie to the
cops, though. You can still continue to remain silent, it is your right.
But the cops will be able to really check if you lie about your name,
address, etc. I know this seems like common sense, but there are probably
going to be a lot of dumb people out there who would try this.

Another note: Target can hold you for a reasonable amount of time before
calling the police. They could keep you in that office for a few hours if
they wanted, pumping you about your theft.

Honestly, I'm not sure what'll happen to you after the cops take you off, I
never checked up. I do know that I've seen people I personally fought to
the ground and arrested walking around free a few months later, so it can't
be that bad.

********** Common Sense and Random Ideas **********

Since I've written this whole thing from about midnight until 8 AM, my
mind's getting fuzzy, but I wanted to finish it all in one go. So here's
the rest of the advice and cool ideas I can offer up before I hit the sack.

Price tag switching is a very common means of theft at any store. You can
steal the sticker off of another, less expensive item, and lay it over the
item you want. Hopefully the cashier will not notice, or you might even
find a slightly crooked friend already working at that store who's willing
to overlook it. Some crooked cashiers will attach stickers to their
forearms or watch, so when their friend comes through the line at a
pre-decided time, they can simply swipe their own arm across as each item
goes pass, ringing up the same price every time. This will be very obvious
if AP ever reviews the transactions by computer, but otherwise is a great
way to help your friends steal. Tech-savvy thieves can also try printing up
their own sticker labels at home by buying an item with a low price,
scanning the image of the barcode into their home computer, and printing
them up on adhesive backed paper, available at any office supply store.

When cutting open a totally sealed package, don't rip it with your bare
hands. This makes way too much noise, and is very noticeable on camera.
Bring along a sharp exacto knife or box cutter, and slice as much as you can
around the item inside. If you can cut it completely away so that no
bending or ripping of the package has to occur to get it out, all the
better. A lot of tricksters will pay cash for a DVD, take it home, and very
carefully open the bottom part of the clear wrapper. They remove the box,
take out the DVD, and carefully slide the box back inside the wrapper, then
reseal it with clear glue. Sometimes they might use a cheap, throwaway CD
or blank CD-ROM to replace it for correct weight. Take it back to the same
store, and return it for your money back (they only make you
exchange-for-the-same if the package has been opened). Your crime will
probably go undiscovered until the next person buys it off the shelf and
brings it back to complain. (Pay with cash so you leave no trail of
yourself, just in case.)

Box stuffing is another common means of theft. Select a very large box
(say a baby stroller), open it up, and stuff lots of small, inexpensive
items into it, then tape it back up (bring your own tape). The cashier
rings up the big box, you pay for it, take it home, and empty out your
goodies. You can even return the big box item the next day and get your
money back.

Don't waste time on small potatoes. Sure, you could steal that DVD today.
Or you could steal a $100 jacket, sell it on Ebay, and buy five DVDs
tomorrow.

If you ever find a receipt from Target on the ground or in the trash
somewhere, and it doesn't look horribly mangled or dirty, see if there's
anything expensive on it paid for by cash or check. (Make sure it's for a
previous day if it's by check, so they can't just say, Oh, here's your
check, we'll just tear it up.) You can then walk into the store, grab that
same item off the shelf, take it to Guest Services and "return" it for the
cash. If you can ever get your hands on a roll of real receipt tape from
Target, you could scan in a real receipt from a minor purchase, and alter it
according to match more expensive items, then print it out yourself. Brand
new is much better than trash receipts. Of course, AP watches for people
doing this, and you may not even realize you have the whole dept. casually
waiting around you at the desk, looking just like customers. I suppose you
could also just buy entirely blank receipt tape of the same texture and size
from an office supply, and scan both the front and back of the receipt,
printing up new ones all your own. However, be forewarned that since they
keep computer-cash register records, they can instantly bring up your
previous transaction, and see that the receipt doesn't match, or doesn't
exist at all. This is why it's better to just use found receipts, or if you
find a dirty, mangled, receipt, print up a shiny new one with the exact same
info on it.

AP also watches specifically for people waiting in cars right outside the
front doors. Thieves will have their buddies wait for them in case they
come out running, so they can peel away. This is stupid, because Target
won't chase you into the parking lot. Just have your friend park way back
in the lot, and run out to them. Or, as suggested earlier, come entirely on
foot, and leave the same way so there's no way to identify you.

If for some reason you ever think about robbing Target's Guest Service desk
(beats me why, it's right out in the open and all), don't fall for their
Robbery Fund. It's a plastic clear bag with wads of cash inside it labeled
"$2000" on each wad. It's really a load of ones with big bills around it.
(I don't think it's an ink-pack or tracker, just a sucker batch to make you
think you got more than you really did.)

If you're one of those ridiculous drug thieves that likes to steal Sudafed
for your suppliers, keep in mind that Target will let you actually buy three
boxes at a time, with no problem. APs don't mind buyers, but when a
jittery, obvious junkie comes in and starts dumping boxes and boxes of
Sudafed into a handbasket, they are definitely going to be waiting for you
at the doors.

The AP offices will always have a spare handcuff key somewhere, probably
hanging on the wall, and a door that has to be opened from the inside
(meaning no one else can come in from the outside without their own key).
The ceiling is usually a false lowered ceiling, which means a person could
push up the acoustic tile, climb onto the wall structures and make their way
carefully to another room, climb quickly down and run for it.

Do not ever act nonchalant, then suspicious when you think you're alone,
then nonchalant again when you see a person walk by. This is what AP is
hoping to see you do. The best thieves will appear casual and like they
don't even notice that they *are* stealing while they're doing it. If you
can open a package while moving around a corner, even better. Corners are
your friends, as they momentarily break surveillance of you as the APS
follows or the camera view has to be switched. If you need to conceal or
dump, do it on the move, preferably the instant after you turn a corner.

At some Targets (the plain Targets), ceiling mirrors will be installed over
some high-theft aisles. APSs will carry small hand mirrors covered by a
magazine or other item, and look down into their mirror, which reflects the
ceiling mirror, and shows them what you're doing in the next aisle over.
For some reason most thieves never look up into these mirrors. They
probably think they're hiding cameras or something. Even without a hand
mirror, an APS can simply pretend to be shopping the top shelf, and glance
upwards directly at the ceiling mirror. If you start to head down the
aisle, they will pace you in the opposite direction, moving around the
endcap right as you do, watching you in the mirror, and you may never even
know they're there. They also sometimes will push along a cart with a large
mirror in it, turned at a sideways angle so they can see down an aisle
they're walking past just before they themselves actually come into view.

If you ever see someone up on a hydraulic lift repairing cameras or moving
camera domes, do not assume it's just a janitor. Only AP touches the
cameras and domes, and they now have a bird's eye view of you.

The best time of day to steal is probably the instant the store opens in
the morning. TPSs working solo shifts have to make the rounds of the store,
and take a tally of all the high-theft items on a clipboard. This keeps
them in a predictable pattern of movement, as they generally make one big
circle around the store, and they won't be in the office watching the
cameras. Many shifts are covered completely alone by a TPS or APS with no
backup at all. Every store usually has only one or two APSs, and at least
three or four TPSs that come on different shifts. At store closing, the
main lights will be shut off, and the doors manned by regular employees so
that no one new comes in, but the last people in the checkout lane may get
out. The TPSs have to make the rounds with the inventory clipboard again at
closing, so this would also be a good time to steal, although it increases
the chance there will be another AP member somewhere in the store or
watching cameras. The TPS will check in Pharmacy, for drugs and razors,
through a lot of aisle for empty packages, the radar detectors, GPS units,
and anything else being watched for high theft.

To sum it all up, the best things you can do for yourself are:
- Come on foot, or park out of view of the store.
- Pay attention to your "shopping". Only lifters watch other shoppers.
- Be casual. Don't look up, or around.
- Once loaded, move fast, and weave.
- Use alternate exits if you don't feel safe.
- Pay attention to radio announcements from nearby employees.
- Hit the bathrooms or changing room to screw them up.
- TPS's by their own lonesome cannot stop you. But they may have backup.
- Try to keep it as far under $20 as you can if you think you'll be caught.
- If all else fails, drop the stuff in very plain view, and leave.

Good luck to all the up-and-comers out there. I hope this tutorial was as
entertaining and informative as the disclaimer says it was. Again, I accept
no responsibility if you actually act on any of this info, and it's your own
damn fault if you get caught. I apologize if I forgot to mention anything,
you'll just have to figure it out on your own. And there's always the
chance that after a few months from this tutorial's release, they'll find
out about it, freak out, and change everything. But, life is an adventure.
Just think slow, follow the guidelines, and you'll be right on Target.
Peace, cheers, and I'm out.

- Xap

=======================================





Friday, October 13, 2006
Target Civil Suit & Target by Dr. Santa
COMPLAINT

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF GEORGIA
ATLANTA DIVISION


Plaintiff,Target Corporation, a Minnesota
corporation
v
JOHN Doe, 1 :06-CV-2116
Defendant

For its Complaint, plaintiff Target Corporation ("Target") states and alleges as
follows:


INTRODUCTION
Target brings this action against an Internet user who is deliberately posting Target copyrighted, confidential, proprietary, and trade secret information across the Internet,including to a website hosted in Minnesota. Target seeks an injunction against Defendant, as well as other available legal and equitable relief arising from Defendant's tortuous actions .

PARTIES
1 . Target is a Minnesota corporation with its principal place of business in
Minneapolis, Minnesota .
2 . The true name and capacity of Defendant is unknown to Plaintiff at this time
Defendant is known to Plaintiff only by his Internet username "Target Sucks ." Additionally,
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 1 of 29

2
mrpauljrogers@yahao com, chams46Chotmail .com, anonymousematl2@aol com,
ILovePie@yahoo.com, and usembassysouthafi-ica@hotmail.com

JURISDICTION AND VENUE
3 This Court hasjurisdiction under 17 U .S C § 101 et seq, 28 U .S .C.
§ 1331(federal question); and 28 U .S C § 1338(a) (copyright) . This Court also has
jurisdiction over this matter under 28 U .S C. § 1332(a)(1) because the matter in controversy
exceeds the sum or value of $75,000, exclusive of interest and costs, and is between citizens of different states .

4 . Venue in this District is proper under 28 U S C § 1391 and/or 28 U .S.C
1400(a). Although the true identity of Defendant is unknown to Plaintiff at this time, on information and belief, Defendant resides in the State of Georgia and a substantial part of the acts of infringement and rrusappropriahon complained of herein occurred in this District .

FACTUAL BACKGROUND
Target's Business and Valuable Intellectual Property Target owns and operates retail merchandise discount stores across the United States . Today, Target operates more than 1400 TARGET stores, including more than 45 TARGET stores in Georgia
6. As part of its effort to protect its retail stores from physical threats and
financial losses, Target, through considerable effort and expense, has created loss prevention procedures and protocols . One of the key loss prevention protocols created by Target is Target's Asset Protection Directives ("Target AP Directives")

7. The Target AP Directives are a set of written methods, techniques and
processes that are used by Target's asset protection personnel to secure Target's merchandise
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 2 of 29

Internet at the website wrAw .targetunion .org . and other property from theft, and to deal with the apprehension of shoplifters and other
wrongdoers . The Target AP Directives are Target copyrighted, confidential, proprietary, and trade secret information .

9 The Target AP Directives include information that is not generally known to
the public or in the industry .
10 . Target goes to considerable measures to protect the secrecy of this
information The Target AP Directives are password restricted and only available to those employees with a "need-to-know," namely, the asset protection team .

11 . Target has an Information Security Policy where all employees, before
commencing their employment, sign an acknowledgement agreeing to maintain the
confidentiality of Target's non-public information . and to never disclose it to anyone outside of the company. Defendant's Improper Use of Target's AP Directives

12. On or around June 29, 2006, Defendant acquired a copy of Target's AP
Directives from a recently terminated Target employee, Scott Hundt ("Hundt") . Upon
information and belief, Hundt only knew Defendant because of his anti-Target website
postings Hundt sent a copy of the Target AP Directives to Defendant by email

13 Hundt, as a former asset protection specialist at a Target store in Wisconsin,
improperly kept the Target AP Directives upon termination .

14. On Sunday, July 2, 2006, Hundt also posted the Target AP Directives on the
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 3 of 29

4
15 . On or around July 10, Target learned of Hundt's improper disclosure to
Defendant and the Internet. Shortly thereafter, Target contacted Hundt by telephone Hundt returned Target's telephone call and acknowledged his wrongdoing . Hundt immediately deleted all references to the Target AP Directives from his hard drive and from the Internet .

16 . Target also demanded that Hundt contact Defendant and request that
Defendant destroy the Target AP Directives, delete any Internet postings of the Target AP Directives posted by him, and never use them again . Hundt stated that he did not know Defendant's name or address, and did not personally know him, but had his email address . Hundt emailed Defendant and requested him to remove the postings, but Defendant failed to respond.

17. Hundt also provided Target with the email address that Hundt had for
Defendant Target emailed Hundt a cease and desist letter at that address, but received no response .

18 Instead of abiding by Target and Hundt's demands to remove the Target AP
Directives, Defendant began posting the Target AP Directives on various retail-employee forums on the Internet, including the following locations :
http //targetsucks elevation24 coin
http //tivwtiv. targeiuniora org
http 11bullseyebb .aivardspace coin
http ://targetstoressuck blogspot corn
http //wwtiv retail-worker corn
http .//people tribe net
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 4 of 29

5
19. Beginning on or around July 12, 2006, Target, through its counsel, sent
demand letters to the moderators and administrators of the websites that posted Target AP Directives. Target advised them that Defendant, under the alias "Target Sucks," was posting improperly Target copyrighted, confidential, proprietary, and trade secret information . (A copy of a sample letter sent to the moderators/administrators is attached as Ex . A )

20. In conjunction with writing to the moderators and/or administrators, Target
also attempted to contact Defendant directly by sending private messages to Defendant
through the forums . (A copy of two sample emails sent to Defendant are attached as Ex . B.)

21 In response to Target's demand letters, the administrators and/or moderators
removed the Target AP Directives from their websrtes .

22. Defendant, however, did not respond to Target's email messages . Instead,
Defendant re-posted the Target AP Directives as soon as the moderator and/or administrator removed them from the website. Target re-contacted the moderators and/or adrrunistrators, and the information was again deleted . Indeed, at least one of the websites - http //targetstoressuck blogspot.com - terminated Defendant's blog .

23 . On July 27, 2006, the moderator of -www .retail-worker coin posted Target's
cease and desist letter on its website and explained why she deleted Defendant's posting of the Target AP Directives . An exchange between Defendant and the moderator ensued, whereby Defendant admitted that he was posting the Target AP Directives for no reason other than to harm Target . (A copy of the email exchange is attached as Ex C .)

24. Since July 27, 2006, Defendant continues to re-post (or attempt to re-post) the
Target AP Directives on the Internet At websites where his blog was inactivated, he has changed his username in order to be able to re-post the Target AP Directives
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 5 of 29

6
25 . Defendant's actions are a complete and intentional disregard of Target's
property rights . Since July 27, 2006, Defendant had posted on numerous websites that
"Target's lawyers are monitoring this website ." In response to Target's cease and desist letter, Defendant states on the Internet that he does not care whether the Target AP Directives are copyrighted or trade secrets :
As to whether or not said info is in some form `protected', I have no idea and
don't care I saw it both online already posted and via email and if someone at
T let the cat out of the bag then that is between T and them . I didn't sign any
confidentiality agreement with them and really don't give a rats ass if they like
it or not .
(A copy of the posting is attached hereto as Ex . D )

26. Defendant has never responded to Target's demands for Defendant to cease
and desist posting the Target AP Directives .

27 . Through various investigative techniques employed by Target over the last
few weeks, Target believes that Defendant uses America On-Line as his Internet Service Provider Target believes that information obtained in discovery will lead to the verification of Defendant's true name and address

COUNT I
Infringement of Copyrights
28 Target realleges and incorporates by reference herein the foregoing allegations
of the Complaint .

29 Target is, and at all relevant times has been, the copyright owners of exclusive
rights under United States copyright law with respect to certain copyrighted Target AP Directives .
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 6 of 29

7
30 . The Target AP Directives are subject to a valid Certificate of Copyright
Registration issued by the Registrar of Copyrights to Target as specified on Exhibit E

31 . Among the exclusive rights granted to Target under the Copyright Act are the
exclusive rights to reproduce the Target AP Directives and to distribute the Target AP Directives

32 . Defendant, without the permission or consent of Target, has used, and
continues to use, the Internet, to disserrvnate and/or make available for distribution to others, the Target AP Directives .

33 . Defendant's dissemination of the Target AP Directives is deliberate, willful,
malicious, oppressive, and without regard to Target's proprietary rights

34 . As a result of Defendant's infringement of Target's copyrights and exclusive
rights under copyright, Target is entitled to statutory damages pursuant to 17 U S .C § 504(c) against Defendant for each infringement by Defendant . Target is also entitled to its attorneys' fees and costs pursuant to 17 U S C . § 505 .
35 Defendant's copyright infringement, and the threat of continuing infringement,
has caused, and will continue to cause, Target repeated and irreparable injury . It would be difficult to ascertain the amount of money damages that would afford Target adequate relief at law for Defendant's acts and continuing acts, and a multiplicity ofjudicial proceedings that would be required Target's remedy at law is not adequate to compensate them for the injuries already inflicted and further threatened by Defendant . Therefore, Defendant should be restrained and enjoined pursuant to the Copyright Act, 17 U S .C. § § 502 and 503

COUNT II
Misappropriation of Trade Secrets
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 7 of 29

Court
36. Target realleges and incorporates by reference herein the foregoing allegations
of the Complaint.

37 Defendant acquired confidential and proprietary information belonging to
Target.

38 Defendant was advised that the information he acquired was Target trade
secret information that should not be used or disclosed by him .
39 After receiving notice of the confidentiality of the Target trade secret
information, Defendant had a duty to Target to maintain the secrecy of this information and limit its use for the benefit of only Target .

40. This confidential and proprietary information had independent economic value
because it was not generally known to or readily ascertainable by persons outside of Target

41 Target intended to keep this information confidential and has made reasonable
efforts under the circumstances to maintain the secrecy of the information .

42. Defendant has used and/or disclosed, and continues to use and/or disclose,
such information without the express or implied consent of Target, for the benefit of himself . Such use constitutes a violation of Ga Stat . § 10-1-760 et seq, and Georgia common law principles against misappropriation of trade secrets

43 . As a direct and proximate cause of Defendant's misappropriation of trade
secrets, Target has been damaged in an amount greater than $75,000, the specific amount of which shall be determined at trial In addition, Target has suffered irreparable harm and will continue to suffer irreparable harm unless the conduct of the Defendant is enjoined by this
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 8 of 29

9
WHEREFORE , Plaintiff Target Corporation respectfully requests judgment against
Defendant as follows :
An injunction, among other things, prohibiting Defendant from disclosing and
using the Target AP Directives and requiring Defendant to delete all Internet postings created by him of the Target AP Directives ;
2. Statutory damages for each infringement pursuant to 17 U .S.C § 504;
Recovery of Target's costs and attorneys' fees incurred herein ; and
4 Any further relief that the Court deems just and equitable .
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 9 of 29

1 0
DUNCAN & MANGIAFICO, PC :
,., Dated. September 1, 2006
nnife C Adair (#001901)
uite 220
7000 Central Parkway
Atlanta, GA 30328
Telephone. (770)698-4560
Facsimile : (770)698-4565
FAEGRE & BENSON LLP :
s/Dara Mann
Dara Mann (#469065)
Suite 1900
3350 Riverwood Parkway
Atlanta, GA 30330
Telephone : (678) 627-8190
Facsitrule• (612) 766-1600
ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF
TARGET CORPORATION
Of Counsel
(upon admission pro hac vice)
James R. Steffen (MN #469065)
Kerry L. Bundy (MN #266917)
Faegre & Benson
2200 Wells Fargo Center
90 South Seventh Street
Minneapolis, MN 55402
Telephone : (612) 766-7000
Facsimle : (612) 766-1600
M2 2 08193 8 3 0 4
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 10 of 29

KERRY L BUNDS
kbundy"4fargrc cum
(6121766 .821
'lien" VIA E-MAIL
Administrator of "Return of the Target Sucks" Website
VIA E-NL4[L
Dear "Jen"/Ms . Destree :
EXHIBIT A
FAEGRE
BENSON _1
U .. I TFn ST47 F5 F NG LAND GERMANY C HINA
July 11, 2005
Jennifer Destree
Registrant of elevation24 .com
733 Hickory Avenue
Orangevale, CA 95662
Re. Improper Disclosure of Target's AP Directives on Website
We represent Target Corporation and Target Brands, Inc . (collectively, "Farget") in
connection with intellectual property matters and in connection with their ongoing efforts to
maintain the security and confidentiality of its proprietary information We are writing to you in your capacity as Administrator and/or Registrant of the blog website http //targetsucks elevation24 com to advise you that a post to the website contains Target confidential, proprietary and trade secret information that has been improperly disclosed In addition, the post wrongfully reproduces copyrighted material belonging to Target [n case you were not aware, on July 2, 2006, user name "Target Sucks" posted to your website Target's 2006 Asset Protection Directives . These directives include information which is used in the conduct of Target's asset protection program and is not generally known to the
public or in the industry. Target goes to considerable measures to protect the secrecy of this information As it appears from your posts that you are a current and,lor former Target employee, you are most likely aware that under Target's policies and procedures, any Target employee who is given access to the Asset Protection Directives is required strictly to maintain the confidentiality of this information

As we hope you can appreciate, Target considers the improper disclosure of its 2006
Asset Protection Directives on the "targetsucks" website to be a very serious matter . Allowing Target's confidential and proprietary security procedures to remain posted on the website provides potential wrongdoers with a blueprint for circumventing Target's security procedures in connection with shoplifting or other criminal activity This not only jeopardizes Target's property, but also could jeopardize the safety of Target customers and employees
220 0 WE LLS FAR GO CE NTER 90 SOUTH SEVE NTH STREET N71 yINE 4P OL]S MINNESOTA SS4D2 39 0 1
TELEPH O NE 612 7ss - 7 0 0 o FACSIMILE 612 7 6 6-160 0 WWW FAEGRE CO M
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 11 of 29

M2 208102 34 01
Jennifer Destree
July 11, Zoos
Page 2
We note that the rules of your forum expressly state that "Me owners of Return of the
Target Sucks reserve the right to remove, edit, move or close any thread for any reason ." Under the circumstances here, Target asks that you remove the July 2, 2006, and any other posting of Target's 2006 Asset Protection Directives at your earliest possible convenience In addition, to allow us to follow up directly with the individual who wrongfully posted
the 2006 Asset Protection Directives, we ask that you promptly supply us with contact
information for poster "Target Sucks "
Your anticipated cooperation is appreciated, and we look forward to receiving prompt
confirmation that you have removed the 2006 Asset Protection Directives from your site and to your provision of contact information for the individual that posted the2006 Asset Protection Directives.

Sincerely,
erry L Bundy
KLB/rew
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 12 of 29

EXHIBIT B
Bundy, Kerry L.
From, Bundy, Ke rry L
Sent : Monday, July 17, 2006 2 46 PM
To: 'annonymousemad2@aol com'
Subject: RE Improper Posting of Target 2006 AP Directives
Attachments : scan pdf
s can p df (78 KB)
Please review the attached letter . Thank you .
Kerry Bundy
Faegre & Benson
2200 Wells Fargo Center
90 S . 7th St .
Minneapolis, MN 55402
612-766-8217
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 13 of 29

VIA E-MAIL
Dear Sir/Madame-
TELEPHONE 672 -766-70 00 1 F A CSI MILE 612 - 7 5 F - 560 9 1 %tiWW FAEGR h l'OM1t
FAEGRE
BENSON
UNITED STATES ENGLAND GERMANY I C HIN A
July 17, 2006
Username "Targetsuc ks"
annonvmousemail2 u,ao l. corn
Re: Improper Disclosure of Target's AP Directives on Internet
K ERRY L.. BI11JD t
k burdyf.4faegrc com
(6 121 766-82 1
We represent Target Corporation and Target Brands, lnc (collect ively, "Target") in
connect ion with intellectu a l property matters and in connection wit h thei r ongoing efforts to
maintain the security and confidentiality of its proprietary information This l etter is to advise
you t hat certain postings made by you of t he Target 2006 Asset Protect i on Directives on the
websi t es http•//targetsucks.elevation24 eom, hitp://www targetunion.org,
As you know, the Target 2006 Asset Protection Directives include information which is
used in the conduct of Target's asset protection program and is not generally known to the public or in the industry . These directives also include copyrighted material As we believe
you also know, Target goes to considerable measures to protect the secrecy of this
information Under Target's policies and procedures, any Target employee who is given access to its Asset Protection Directives is required strictly to maintain the confidentiality of this information Access to these directives are restricted to Target AP employees and under no circumstances are they to be distributed to anyone outside of Target .

Target considers the improper disclosure of its 2006 Asset Protection Directives on the Internet to be a very serious matter . Allowing Target's confidential and proprietary security procedures to remain posted on the website provides potential wrongdoers with a blueprint for circumventing Target's security procedures in connection with shoplifting or other criminal activity. This not only jeopardizes Target's property, but also could jeopardize the safety of Target employees and guests

It is our understanding that, although you were provided improperly with the Target 2006 Asset Protection Directives by a former Target employee, that person has requested that you delete all postings made by you that contain the Target 2006 Asset Protection Directives We hope and expect that upon review of the facts set forth in this letter, you will delete all such
2200 WEL LS FARGO CENTER I 9 0 SOUTH S EVFNTH S TRF FT I M17 INYCAPOLIS MINNESOTA S5a0 1-3 9 61
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 14 of 29

h12 20910 329 0 3
Targetsucks
July 17, 2006
Page 2
postings at your earliest convenience . Target also requests that you immediately destroy all paper and electronic copies of the Target 2006 Asset Protection Directives in your possession .

Please provide us with prompt, written confirmation of your compliance with these requests no later than noon on Tuesday, July 18, 2006 . If we do not receive timely confirmation from you, we will assume that you do not intend to remove your wrongful posts, and we will proceed to consider and take further appropriate action .
Your anticipated cooperation is appreciated .

Sincerely,
CJ
Kerry undy
KLB/rew
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 15 of 29

July 27, 2006
VIA E-MAIL
Dear Sir/Madame .
T F I F 11110N' F 612-7 6 5 7 000 HALS1%111 F 617 766 1600 %VW%Y F AI'C R F C UN7
COPY FAEGRE C OPY
BENSON
lLP
UNITED STATES I ENGLAND GERMANY ' CHINA
KERRY L B[,T1DY
kbundy i~ faegre coin
(6 12) X 65- 82 1 1
Username "Targetsucks"
Re: Improper Disclosure of Target's AP Directives on Internet
We represent Target Corporation and Target Brands, Inc. (collectively, "Target") in
connection with intellectual property matters and in connection with their ongoing efforts to
maintain the security and confidentiality of its proprietary information . This letter is to advise you that certain postings made by you of the Target 2006 Asset Protection Directives on the website http //Kww retail-worker coin contain Target copyrighted, confidential, proprietary and trade secret information that has been improperly disclosed .

As you know, the Target 2006 Asset Protection Directives include information which is
used in the conduct of Target's asset protection program and is not generally known to the public or in the industry These directives also include copyrighted material . As we believe you also know, Target goes to considerable measures to protect the secrecy of this information Under Target's policies and procedures, any Target employee who is given access to its Asset Protection Directives is required strictly to maintain the confidentiality of this information Access to these directives are restricted to Target AP employees and under no circumstances are they to be distributed to anyone outside of Target Target considers the improper disclosure of its 2006 Asset Protection Directives on the Internet to be a very serious matter. Allowing Target's confidential and proprietary security
procedures to remain posted on the website provides potential wrongdoers with a blueprint for circumventing Target's security procedures in connection with shoplifting or other criminal activity This not only jeopardizes Target's property, but also could jeopardize the safety of Target employees and guests.

We hope and expect that upon review of the facts set forth in this letter, you will delete all such postings at your earliest convenience . Target also requests that you immediately destroy all paper and electronic copies of the Target 2006 Asset Protection Directives in your possession .

Please provide us with prompt, written confirmation of your compliance with these requests no ater than noon on Tuesday, July 18, 2006 If we do not receive timely confirmation from you, we will assume that you do not intend to remove your wrongful posts, and we will proceed to consider and take further appropriate action
2 200 wbLtS FA UCO C F VT FK 90 SOUT H yF.v h `T H ST1tFF 7 t11 NtYrA P OL 1 5 M1uNVk SUTA SS ao 2-7 901
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 16 of 29

M2 20814344 01
Targetsucks
July 27, 2006
Page 2
Your anticipated cooperation is appreciated.
Sincerely,
Kerry L. Bundy
KLBlrew
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 17 of 29

WORKER
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Guess I'll hang out here then .
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sleK Says:
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6 07pm
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Commented
Home » Forum * Specific Stores * Target Employee Forums Anyone Know Why
The Target Sucks Forum Is Down?
Anyone know why the target sucks forum is- down?
Submitted by backroompeon on Mon, 02/13/2006 - 1 14am.
I am sorry to see it gone . And I had been on there earlier tonight .
loin or register to post comments j f I11 I ~ I 0 I aY ILo Ile I
P5
Targetflowslave
Says:
Mon, 02/13/2006 -
5 2 4am
redandkhak i
Says:
Thu, 02/ 1 6/2006 -
11 23am
Thats what i want to know
login or register to post comments
backroompeon wrote :
I am sorry to see it gone . And I had been on
there earlier tonight .
Guess I'll hang out here then .
Who gives a flying f**k where it went. It's narrowminded
people are gone, at least for now, until they start making
trouble here or somewhere else . You know the ones, the die
hard fans of target. Targets cks was a corporate venture .
login or register to post mments
there seems t o be s ome delet in g of thi s info g oin g on
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 18 of 29

sle K Says:
Thu, 07/27/2006 -
11 .34pm
login or register to post comments
login or register to post comments
i0 MYYk ic-p!
nAaa m IC
Q -0 MY MSN
Technoratl
?lDG PINCER
JIM B1oglLae a
i0 6-
0 MrFeeascer
Jim .aia 0)4
[p IInMF111
s1eK Says :
Fri, 07/28/2006 -
12-56am
More like : If they want to F . with their
customers then their customers may want to

Target's lawyers are out and about issuing cease & desist
letters.
edit: More information - Our first Cease & Desist, courtesy
of Target
login or register to post comments
Target Sucks .. wrote:
I'm not bringing up p. 2 of Kerrys letter . My
machine or didn't it post?
Your machine, I suppose, as I can view it in its entirety and
I've heard no other complaints .
sleK Says: Assuming that you're the same "Target Sucks" that's been
rnu, 07/27/2006 - posting the AP Directives everywhere, could you explain the
11 51pm significance of them or explain why you appear rather hellbent
on keeping them in the public domain?
I don't understand either the relevance or the purpose and I
haven't been able to find a suitable explanation .
sleK Says :
Fn , 07/28/2006 -
12 33am
Ok, so it is just disclosure for the sake of disclosure .
Quote:
BTW : Thought you caved in ra ther quickly on
that .
Well, if there was some point to it I'd probably be willing to
help. But, as it appears that there's really no cause and
you're just stirring the pot to see the water go 'round,
there's no reason for me to get involved .
login or register to post comments
Quote :
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 19 of 29

login or register to post comme n ts
Fair enough, but surely you understand how unreasonable it
is to expect site ops', like myself, to support your apparent
grudge when faced with the costly prospect of litigation?
Quote:
It may have taken 3 yrs but Tarbutt is spending
some cash trying to put the genie back in the
internet bottle .
It's a beautiful thing . Once it's out there it's out there .
login or register to post comments
sleK Says :
Fri, 07/28/2006 -
6 52pm Quote:
I would only opine that it seems to say that
once info is published that is the end of
confidentiality .
That may be so but it doesn't dissolve liability.
IANAL, but it appears to me that an entity needs only to
establish the economic value of the information and
demonstrate "reasonable efforts to maintain the secrecy" of
the information before injunctive relief and damages can be
granted.
Quote:
Gee Slick, a 33 year old female ski bum ran
right over you I I I !
Is this addressed to me?
Look, I'm just trying to help as it's pretty clear that you
haven't the faintest clue about what you're getting yourself
into .
The simple fact is that you may end up in court, facing
whatever injunctive relief and damages that Target puts on
the table, should Target choose to pursue you . From
experience, I can tell you that it's not a fun place to be . But,
if you're intent on finding out for yourself, keep it up and
good luck.
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 20 of 29

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Posted by
Rockta ne
Put yourself in Target's place : one of your ex-employees has
posted on a website confidential proprietary information about
The Target Stores Employees' Web Site
Home » Forum N Workplace Issues » General Co nversation
Posted by Target Sucks - at 2006-07-28 08 : 38
This site is being monitored by the Faegre Benson law firm on behalf of Target Stores .
The screen name used is normally 'bunkl' and this person is Kerry L . Bundy of the law
firm of Faegre Benson 612 766 8217. kbundy@faegre .com .
He and his firm are monitoring this web site for anti Target activities .
FYI : http ://www.retail-worker.com/documents/20060727 .target cease_and_desist .pdfpri nt er friendly page
Username :
Password :
Posted by This is horrible news . I hope this site does not give up your
jollyrancher information . Shameful of them to even ask . It's one thing to ask
Fn, 2006-07-28 to have your post removed, but I'm sure there is some sort of
11 :08 privacy act . A million scurges on Mr . Bundy and Faegre Benson
Law firm.
Fast answers
from union reps
? direct deposit
? ETL Round-Robin
interview
? 8 hours between shifts
Posted by The link above refers to a different site, not this one, and the
Rocktane document in question is confidential proprietary information, not
Fri, 2006-07-28 anything to do with organizing or union activities . I'm sure they
12 :56 check this site also, as you would expect if there's a risk that a
disgruntled employee or ex-employee might be revealing
company secrets . I'm shocked that anyone would be surprised
by this .
l ogi n or reg is ter to po s t comment s
f Posted by I guess it doesn't surprise me that they monitor the site . But to
i jollyrancher sic their attorneys on someone. After my experience at Target
Fri, 2006-07-28 and seeing the Nazi behavior there, I hate everything about it .
13 :17 And any company that would work for them . Plague on them all
for supporting a company tha treats people so poorly .
login or reg iste r to post c omments
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 21 of 29

------ --
Fri, 2006 -07- 28
j 13 :40
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Fri, 2006 - 07-28
15 :55
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the inside operations of a business you own, which, as one of
your employees, they signed an agreement not to reveal, and
which could cost your company millions of dollars . Y don't know
if such an offense would be legally prosecutable, but at would
certainly warrant pressure to stop it. I would expect you to pull
out all the stops . What is different about Target
Posted by I can see Target's side I guess, but then maybe they shouldn't
i jollyrancher treat people so poorly . I think they are a shitty company and
Fn, 2006-07-28 they and anyone that they retain, are one in the same, bastards .
i 15 :30 This lawfirm should be embarrassed to be associated with
Target.
jollyrancher wrote :
I can see Target's side !guess, but then maybe they
shouldn't treat people so poorly . I think they are a
shitty company and they and anyone that they
retain, are one in the same, bastards . This lawfirm
should be embarrassed to be associated with Target .
I agree that Target should not treat people badly . Nor should
any other company, in an ideal world . I am apparently lucky in
that I have not had your negative experience ; Target has
treated me pretty well . I've had a couple of GLs that required
me to use my diplomatic skills to get along with, and once or
twice I was denied a day off that I had requested, but otherwise,
I have no real complaints . I get chills when I think how I almost
got stuck working at a focal assembly plant when the Target DC
was having its job fair. That place would have been a nightmare
if they'd hired me ; just the few days I worked there as a temp
creeped me out for weeks . Thank god Target hired me ; there is
nothing they've thrown at me yet that I couldn't handle, or that
even approached some of the crap I've had to put up with at
other places . Obviously, it must be a lot different in your neck of
the woods .
~ Posted by I think it probably does have a lot to do with what part of the
jollyrancher country you are in . Certain people get into power and become
Fn, 2006-07-28 control freaks and make everyone miserable . And because of
16:06 that, sites like this form and people leak out sensitive info . V
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 22 of 29

Target Sucks -
Fri, 2006-07-28
17 :04
Firefox is a free, open
source web browser that's
way better than Internet
Explorer
login or register to post comments
i Posted by Duly noted on the gender of Kerry . I went off of the original
jollyrancher post . Even worse in my opinion for a woman to represent such a
i Fn, 2006-07-28 selfish company That is funny about trying to keep the genie in

jollyran icher wrote:
This is horrible news . I hope this site does not give
up your information . Shameful of them to even ask .
It's one thing to ask to have your post removed, but
I'm sure there is some sort of privacy act . A million
scurges on Mr . Bundy and Faegre Benson haw firm .
[b]
As pointed out by another poster the site threatened is the 2
retailworker .com sites ( & retail-worker.com) I also noted that
one site on which this was posted is now closed down with no
prior notice .
As far as I know it was posted on this site by another poster and
even prior to that it was emailed to me and it was put onto
several sites .
I believe that the OP here and the owner of the TS site closed
were both employees of T, but I don't know that for certain, well
1 I don't know for certain . I doubt that either of them are still T
employees .
As to whether or not said info is in some form 'protected', I have
no idea and don't care . I saw it both online already posted and
via email and if someone at T let the cat out of the bag then that
is between T and them . I didn't sign any confidentiality
agreement with them and really don't give a rats ass if they like
it or not .
My private opinion, and I am not an atty, is that once someone
else posted it online it was free for anyone to copy or repast . I
think there may be some sort of constitutional argument there
about 'free speach' or some such BS but I will leave it to more
smarter people than me to look into that .
All I can predict is that other nice people, like those reading this,
will probably copy it and repost it on other sites, so the people at
Faegre Benson will be quite busy trying to get the genie back
into the Internet bottle .
BTV1f : Kerry L. Bundy is a 'she' (W/F/33) not as initially identified
as a 'he' . Take a look at :
http ://www .Faegre.com/lawyer_bio .aspx7pid=7371
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 23 of 29

Not surprisingly, there are advantages and disadvantages to
using trade secret protection to secure different types of
business assets. Deciding whether to patent certain technology -
or keep it under wraps as a trade secret - is often a tough
strategic call . Usually, the decision rests on the type of
information that needs to be protected .
Most intellectual property owners find the indefinite time limit of
trade secret protection appealing, assuming that the information
can be maintained in confidence and not easily replicated in the
market. For example, say that the knowledge you wish to protect
is a manufacturing process . If you patent the process, you get
protection for about twenty years . Even though your competitors
know exactly what you're doing, they can't copy your process
when your patent expires, however, it's open season on that
technology .
By contrast, if you rely on trade secret protection to secure your
process, your protection lasts forever, as long as the process
Fri, 2006-07-28 jollyrancher wrote :
17 :27
Duly noted on the gender of Kerry . I went off of the
original post . Even worse in my opinion for a woman
to represent such a selfish company . That is funny
about trying to keep the genie in the bott le. LOL
Here is a longish brief on info confidentiality . A casual reading by
me seems to suggest that once info is published it looses its
confidential trade secret status . Take a read and inform yourself
on the issue :
An Ove rview of Trade Secret Pro tection
Can you keep a secret?
That's the challenge for intellectual property owners who rely on
trade secret protection to secure their sensitive business assets .
Unlike patents, most copyrighted works, and trademarks - which
must be publicly disclosed in order to seek recourse from
competitors who want to stea l them -- trade secrets have legal
value only to the extent that they stay secret .
File a patent on a new chemical or drug, and you can enjoy
exclusive legal rights for about 20 years (often less in practical
market terms) . As long as you keep trade secrets away from
prying eyes, however, they last forever . The trade-off Once
they're out, they're gone . A no-longer-secret trade secret enjoys
essentially no legal protection under trade secret laws .
Just about anything can qualify as a trade secret - formulae,
computer programs, business methods, database information,
customer lists - basically, any knowledge that has economic
value because people such as competitors don't know about it
and could profit from it if they did . It doesn't necessarily have to
be new, different, or unique, as you would expect from patented
material and/or even fixed in a tangible form, as with
copyrighted works . As long as the information has value because
no one else knows about it - and you take reasonable efforts to
avoid disclosure - it can qualify as a trade secret .
Pros a nd Cons
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 24 of 29

Protecting Your Trade Secrets
How do you take reasonable efforts to protect your trade
secrets Here are a few key stepsremains
secret. However, if a competitor is able to replicate the
process (without stealing your information), such as through
reverse engineering, they're free to do so at a ny time, and there
is usually little or nothing you can do about it . So the question
your business faces is : how vulnerable is your knowledge to
being replicated or discovered by others The answer will shape
the kind of IP protection you're likely to seek .
Misappropriation
Unlike patents and copyrights that are governed by federal law,
trade secret protection derives primarily from state law . The
origins of trade secret doctrine date all the way back to a
Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court decision in 1868, and
while numerous courts (including federal courts) have weighed
in on specific aspects of trade secret law ever since, no federal
civil legislation has ever tackled trade secrets directly . Instead,
trade secret laws have been enacted on a state-by-state basis .
Minnesota was the first state to adopt the Uniform Trade Secret
Act (UTSA) in 1980, and more than forty other states have since
followed suit . The UTSA was adopted in the wake of an
increasing reliance by businesses on trade secret protection and
a desire to codify common law trade secret principles .
Distilled to its essence, under the UTSA and most state
interpretations, the existence of a trade secret is established
using a two-fold test . First, you must have knowledge or
information that derives independent economic value from not
being generally known or readily ascertainable . Second, you
must have taken reasonable efforts to maintain the secrecy of
the knowledge or information . In that circumstance, the llTSA
provides protection by prohibiting the "misappropriation" of
trade secrets and providing various remedies, including
INJUNCTIVE and .
"Misappropriation" covers both obtaining trade secrets through
improper means and disclosing or using them without consent .
The UTSA also casts a broad net to include not only actual
misappropriation (where the theft or disclosure has actually
occurred), but also "threatened" misappropriation (which some
courts have held to include events such as a key employee
bolting to a competitor and putting a trade secret at serious risk
of disclosure) .
What kinds of actions or circumstances create the greatest risk
for trade secret owners Consider the following :
One of your employees or independent contractors who has
knowledge of your trade secrets leaves to join one of your
competitors
One of your suppliers or distributors also works for a key
competitor
One of your licensees, customers, business partners, or
employees decides to start a competing business
You disclose your confidential information to a prospective
business partner, and the deal fails through
This is not an exhaustive list, just a sample of the many ways in
which day-to-day business dealings put your trade secrets at
risk of misappropriation
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 25 of 29

Extend the security procedures to computer systems . Obviously,
trade secrets stored in electronic format are particularly
susceptible to theft . The entire subject of information systems
security may warrant a thorough review by the organization, to
minimize the possibility of external "hacking" or internal security
breaches. The same care regarding access and labeling that is
extended to physical space or documentation, should extend to
computer systems where trade secrets are stored .
Be mindful of third parties . If business associates, prospective
customers, or members of the public have access to facilities in
which trade secrets are stored or used, take particular care to
avoid inadvertent disclosure . This might include accidents
(where documents are left carelessly in open view) or even
deliberate but unintentional disclosures (such as tour guides or
other employees who inform visitors about the project or
process within the facility) .
Screen speeches and publications where appropriate . Trade
secrets often wind up being disclosed unintentionally at trade
shows or in magazine articles, publications, press releases, or
speeches . Engineers, marketing executives, mid-level managers,
and others may exchange ideas with colleagues or share
information publicly because they are unaware of its sensitivity .
Put it in writing . Consider keeping a written statement of your
trade secret security policy . This provides two advantages . Fir st,
" unwritten rules" may wind up being laxly or inconsistently
enforced within the organization . Second, documented trade
secret pol icies provide evidence in court of the seriousness of
the company 's efforts to protect its secrets .
Let your employees know . A proper trade secret protection plan
should make employees aware of the confidentiality of certain
information and, where appropriate, periodically remind them of
thei r obligations to keep that information secure . This would
include hav ing employees counter-sign wr itten confidentiali ty
agreements. In addition, companies should consider conducting
"exit interviews " with departing employees that i nclude a written
reminder of their ongoing responsibility to keep trade secret
information secure .
Restrict access . "Sorry, that information is on a need-to-know
basis." Where appropriate, keep trade secret information
physically separate from nonproprietary information, and restrict
access only to those who genuinely require it . Depending on the
nature of the intellectual property, this segregation may be as
simple as keeping information in a separate filing cabinet, or it
may necessitate building an entirely separate and secure facility .
Implement physical security. Consider providing additional
security for the information through locked doors, gates, and
cabinets. Again, the level of physical security will vary depending
on the nature of the information and how the information is used
in the business operations .
Consider labeling trade secret documentation . It can be very
easy to reproduce, scan, and distribute documents today . Not
only should documentation related to trade secret information be
treated with special care, but in appropriate circumstances, it
may be prudent to label trade secret documents as "SECRET" or
"CONFIDENTIAL ." A company may also want to educate its
employees who have access to such documents about their
status, including the sensitivity of and destruction of trade secret
documents .
Case 1:06-cv-02116-CC Document 1-1 Filed 09/05/2006 Page 26 of 29

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One tool for reducing this risk is implementing a policy of prescreening
all public communications .
Protect yourself with contracts . The nature of many businesses
may require a company to disclose its trade secrets to potential
buyers, licensees, joint venture partners, or other outsiders .
When engaging in these kinds of third-party transactions,
consider monitoring the flow of information carefully and
documenting the nature of the trade secrets exposed and the
specific limited use to which they may be put . This may include
specific confidentiality agreements with the third parties.
When properly identified and secured, trade secrets can often be
the most powerful of the various forms of intellectual property
protection, given the indefinite lifespan they can offer . Trade
secret owners can also obtain swift and dramatic relief in court if
they act quickly and have taken care along the way to document
and follow their trade secret protection plan . But trade secrets
are, by their very nature, fragile . A secret only has value to the
extent you can keep it a secret .
And in case you wondered who wrote this it is our pal Ms . Kerry
L Bundy the 33 yr old ski bunny from Mn .





========================

Target

by Dr. Santa

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This is first hand knowledge from someone that not only used to work for Target, but was an Assets Protection Team Leader (LP manager) for several stores. Why would I write this article? For starters, I'm tired of reading articles by amateurs, the kind of amateurs that we used to catch all of the time. I have my own personal anarchistic/nihilistic reasons for wanting the company's shrink to go through the roof. First off, a lesson in the Assets Protection structure at Target. Remember, you are responsible for how you use this information. This article is for informational purposes only, if you get caught, that's on you.

The people that stand at the doors are called Target Protection Specialists (TPS). The people in plain clothes that walk the floor and look at cameras are called Assets Protection Specialists (APS). The manager of the AP team at store level is the Assets Protection Team Leader (APTL). There are of course district APTL's and so on up. There are market investigators that investigate organized theft rings (MIT's), and check fraud etc.

Now, some of their policies that you need to know about. The TPS' cannot make apprehensions unless they are directed to do so by an APS or APTL. There are five steps that must be followed in order for an APS/APTL to apprehend a shoplifter:

1- Initiate observation. Must see the individual in an area without the company's merchandise.

2- Selection. Must observe the subject select Target merchandise.

3- Concealment. Must observe the subject conceal Target merchandise. Reasonable doubt can be used. For instance, if you see someone with a cd in their hands, and they turn around, with their back facing you, and when they turn back the merchandise is no longer in their hands.

4- Maintain observation. Must maintain reasonable observation of the individual.

5- Exit/Apprehension. The individual must pass all points of sale, making no attempt to pay for the stolen merchandise.

Now I need to clarify a few things. Just like there are laws that are broken everyday, so Target AP team members break the rules. Just like our citizens, some AP members bend the rules, some outright break them, and some altruists follow them to a T (they aren't around long though because they don't catch anyone). Most are somewhere in the middle. The first two rules are not important. The 3rd and 4th are critical, particularly the 4th. Let me give you some examples of ways to make your shoplifting experience at Target both enjoyable and profitable:

1: The lone shoplifter. You're alone and want to get some things. Fine. Just don't come in looking like a meth addict that needs a quick fix. Now, Target AP team members are not to discriminate based on age, race, social status (poor) etc....right. Believe that if you want. If you walk into a Target store with trashy, baggy jeans, an antisocial t-shirt, and more hair color than cyndi lauper you will be watched (if someone is working, or paying attention). I'm not saying wear a suit and tie, just ask yourself, "if I was in AP, would I watch me"? Ok, there's a ton of things you can get, let's just say you want a few DVD's. You make a selection (I would suggest no more than three at one time), now make your way to the back of the store. Go somewhere in the back that is not next to anything they would want a camera on (GPS units for instance, probably have a camera on them). Go somewhere in toys, furniture, etc. Make your move quickly and decisively, no need to look around, just be alone on the aisle you conceal on. Even if they see you, you're still in the clear because now I'm about to reveal the holy grail of shoplifter insider trading...AP cannot make apprehensions if you go to the fitting room or the restroom. PERIOD! I'm not saying it doesn't happen, but it is VERY rare, and they usually get written up for doing it.

So now, you go to the fitting room with a pair of jeans. Go inside for a minute or two. This gives you a chance to make sure that they cannot see a square imprint on your pants. If they see the imprint they might take you! Now, the second holy grail...go to the bathroom. Most likely if you were being watched they would try to "PMR" you. PMR stands for 'Productive Merchandise Recovery', in plain terms they will try to intimidate you into 'dumping' the merchandise. If you see the TPS come in, or a guy in plain clothes with a radio staring at you, they are trying to PMR you. If they were going to apprehend you they would conceal themselves as much as possible (you most likely won't see them). If they are PMR'ing you then you've won the game. Simply smile and leave. Don't worry about the alarm, just keep going. If they stop you make up something like, "you're watching me because I'm FILL IN THE BLANK". Tell them you don't have time for this and keep going. Now, don't do this ALL the time because the team can get permission to make a bathroom/restroom stop from their DAPTL if they show a pattern on an individual, but only in extreme cases.

I recommend shoplifting in groups. The following is almost full-proof (nothing is 100%).

2- Box Stuffing

Why more people don't do this I will never know. I see idiots walk in and fill up a cart of merchandise and walk out. It's bold and will work often, but if they are watching you're toast. Box stuffing needs at least 2 people, but three works best. The toughest part about this is getting up in the morning! You should start this routine between 8:15 and 11:00 am, the earlier the better. Take a marker, clear packing tape and a box-cutter with you. Get a cart and select whatever you want to lift. Think about what you want and then go to the box size you need. For instance, if you are taking as much electronics merchandise as you can, then you'll need to go to a vacuum aisle. If you just want 10 dvd's, then go to the lamp aisle in furniture. Let's assume you're going for a big load. Go to vacuums. If you have a lookout, great, they will help you stop when a team member or guest (customer) comes near the aisle. Now think SPEED! You will want to open the vacuum (the cheaper the better) on the bottom. You will then begin stuffing as much of the merchandise in the box as possible. If there is tape on the box that has a bullseye,and TARGET on it, that is ok. Once you get all of the merchandise in then seal the box up with the clear tape OVER the Target tape. The cashier won't be able to tell! Now take your marker and mark the box with a small dot (don't use black)near the bottom or on the bottom.

Have your accomplice (NOT YOU) come in at least one hour later (no more than 2-3, or else someone else might get your treasure). Tell them to get a cart, go to the vacuum aisle, and look around for a couple of minutes. Make it look like they are shopping, but don't go overboard, a couple of minutes is fine. Find your box by the mark (and the description of the vacuum from the accomplice) and put the vacuum in the cart. When you go to the checkout just go up, smile, and help the cashier by moving the box closer to them so they can scan the vacuum WITHOUT holding the box. Now, if the phone rings, and they ask to check the box you've been caught! But that's ok, they can't apprehend you. If this happens just act like you're in a hurry and leave. You have not committed a crime. As far as the law is concerned, all you did was get a vacuum that had merchandise in it. Make sure the person buying the stuffed box is driving a different vehicle than the person that stuffed it. Later, you can bring the vacuum back with the receipt and return it. Now, if you go to the same store all of the time, eventually a market investigator might get involved. Just don't get greedy and you'll be fine.

3- The bathroom heist (works better for women).

Ok, this only works for small items (cd's, dvd's, etc). You need two people for this. Have a friend (same sex) waiting for you in the car. Arrange for them to go into the store 2 minutes after you. You go in and select whatever you want (make sure the other person can conceal it all, this is why women are better for this because they have purses). The second person will have already entered the store and gone into the restroom. Have them wait in a stall. You go in with the merchandise out in the open. Go into the other stall. Peek down at your friend's shoes to make sure they are next to you. Do not talk! Hand the merchandise over, have them conceal and walk out. You wait two minutes, and then leave. They might try to PMR you, but you don't have anything, so just walk right out. If they apprehend you then you've really hit pay dirt! Don't admit ANYTHING...you did nothing wrong. Tell them you changed your mind and put them down, you don't know where they are at. They will let you go, and you are in the clear. Then call back and complain, you might get a giftcard out of it! There is virtually no chance of getting caught at this game!

As many of you know, there are other ways to go about stealing from Target, but these are almost guaranteed to get you off free! Don't do stupid shit like walk out the fire exit with a cart load of merchandise. Yes, people do it, but they will immediately pull pictures of you entering the store and then distribute those pictures to other store's AP teams. Why bring that kind of attention to yourself? If you know someone that works for Target then you are really in the clear, because it makes box stuffing 10 times easier! Having a cashier pass merchandise works, but is risky. All it takes is for one of the AP members to be watching and your both going to jail. If you guys like this article, let me know, and I will reveal some other secrets! Never admit if you are caught, don't say a word!


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Shoplifting and Employee Theft Recovery Up Last Year
From Melody Vargas,Your Guide to Retail Industry.FREE Newsletter. Sign Up Now!

17th Annual Retail Theft Survey

More than 750,000 shoplifters and dishonest employees were apprehended last year by just 27 U.S. retail companies, according to the 17th Annual Retail Theft Survey from Jack L. Hayes International. While both shoplifting and employee theft recovery and apprehensions were up, these same retailers still lost over $4.7 billion to shrink.
"The losses are staggering and continue to amaze us, especially the shoplifting statistics over the past several years", said Mark R. Doyle, President of Jack L. Hayes International. "Both the number of shoplifters apprehended and the dollars recovered from those apprehensions increased for the fourth straight year. On the internal theft issue, both the number of dishonest employees apprehended and the dollars recovered from those apprehensions increased in 2004, reversing a 3 year trend."

Key Findings from 17th Annual Retail Theft Survey

Source: Jack L. Hayes International, Inc.

Retail Theft Survey Participants 27 large retailers with annual sales of $441.4 billion, employing over 1.7 million employees in 12,908 stores across the U.S.
Total Apprehensions Increased Last Year Total apprehensions of both shoplifters and dishonest employees in 2004 increased 4.78 percent to 752,629 from 718,264 the prior year.

Total Dollar Recovery Increased Last Year Total dollar recoveries from apprehended shoplifters and dishonest employees exceeded $112 million. This was an increase of 3.26 percent over recoveries in 2003.

Shrinkage Loss and Recovery Only 2.74 percent of total retail theft losses resulted in a recovery. For every $1.00 recovered by the surveyed companies, $36.47 was lost to retail theft.

Shoplifters For the fourth straight year, the number of shoplifters apprehended and the dollars recovered from those apprehended shoplifters increased. Last year, 689,340 shoplifters were apprehended, an increase of 4.86 percent over the prior year. The retailers recovered $70.0 million from those apprehended, up 1.61 percent over 2003. In addition, the dollars recovered from shoplifters where no apprehension was made also increased by 4.86 percent. This is the 8th consecutive year of increases in recoveries without apprehension.

Employee Theft Of the retailers surveyed, one in every 27.8 was apprehended for theft from their employer in 2004. Both the number of dishonest employees apprehended and the dollars recovered during those apprehensions increased last year. The retailers recovered $42.4 million, an increase of 6.10 percent, from the 63,289 dishonest employees apprehended, and increase of 4.01 percent over the prior year.

The increase reverses a 3 year trend of declining employee theft recoveries.
Case Value On a per case average, dishonest employees steal approximately $671.03, which is 6.6 times the $101.60 stolen by shoplifters. Last year, the average case value of recoveries from shoplifters dropped $3.25, a decrease of 3.1 percent. The average case value recovered from employee theft rose by $13.25, an increase of 2.01 percent in 2004.

According to Jack Hayes, "Shoplifting and employee theft are serious crimes which continue to plague retailers and have a serious negative effect on their bottom-line profits. These crimes continue to hurt our economy, costing consumers higher prices at the cash register, and causing a loss of jobs when retailers are forced to close stores or even go out of business."

==================================================

Activity in Target v. Doe suit:

1:06-cv-02116-CC

Target Corporation v. Doe

Clarence Cooper, presiding
Date filed: 09/05/2006
Date of last filing: 10/20/2006

History Doc.No. Dates Description

1 Filed: 09/05/2006 Entered: 09/06/2006 Complaint

2 Filed & Entered: 09/06/2006 Terminated: 09/11/2006 Motion to Expedite-- Filed & Entered: 09/07/2006 Submission to District Judge

3 Filed & Entered: 09/11/2006 Order on Motion to Expedite

4 Filed: 09/11/2006 Entered: 09/13/2006 Terminated: 10/20/2006 Application for Admission Pro Hac Vice

5 Filed & Entered: 09/19/2006 Notice (Other)

6 Filed &amp; Entered: 09/20/2006 Notice (Other)

7 Filed & Entered: 09/21/2006 Notice (Other)

8 Filed & Entered: 10/20/2006 Order on Application for Admission PHV

Posted by Target Stores Suck at 3:33 PM



Sunday, September 10, 2006
AP Position Descriptions for Target Security
===================================
TARGET Stores Assests Protection Manager


Date: 2006-11-21, 10:56AM PST


See Yourself at Target

Employing more than 270,000 team members in 47 states, we value creativity, diversity and collaboration in all its forms. From stocking our stores' shelves with fantastic products at great prices to a deep commitment to community giving, Target strives for excellence in every area.

Store Assets Protection (Loss Prevention)

As a team member of the Assets Protection team in Target stores, you'll help create a safe, secure environment for guests and team members through your work on shortage control, safeness, and theft and fraud control.


Purpose

As an Executive Team Leader - Assets Protection, you'll supervise and administer our Assets Protection programs, upholding the reliability of your store's security measures at every step. In addition, you'll build and develop your store's Assets Protection team to ensure these programs are carried out accurately and consistently, creating a positive shopping experience for our guests and a safe work environment for our team.

See Yourself:
•Keeping our stores safe and secure against loss
•Maintaining team member awareness of stock shortage programs
•Fostering awareness of internal theft among store team members
•Initiating investigations and interviews when losses occur
•Implementing and maintaining shoplifter prevention programs
•Directing and participating in the detection, apprehension and processing of shoplifters
•Hiring, training and supervising the Assets Protection team and ensuring maximum coverage to the store through proper scheduling
•Following through on all mandated safety programs to reduce losses
•Maintaining positive working relationships with local political, educational and law enforcement officials and agencies

Job Requirements
Minimum Requirements:
•College degree required
•Two or more years of supervisory/management experience
•Two or more years investigative and/or other retail experience
•Experience in conducting interviews
•Ability to work with highly confidential information
•Ability to move about all areas of the store quickly and without attracting attention, including climbing ladders and maneuvering in and out of confined areas
•Ability to apprehend and confront guests and team members in a calm, professional and diplomatic manner
•Ability to work flexible work hours including some nights and weekends
See The Rewards

Eligible team members will receive one of the best earnings packages anywhere, including competitive pay, all-around insurance coverage, 401(k), flexible scheduling, training and development and many other perks and benefits. See a place of exciting challenges and rewards. See a place where you'll feel empowered to do something brilliant. See a place filled with creativity and unlimited opportunity. See a place where 'work' could easily be called play. To apply, visit our careers Web site at Target.com/careers to view all career opportunities. See yourself here. Target is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer and is a Drug-Free Workplace.

==================================================

Investigator with Target Stores


Date: 2006-11-14, 10:15AM PST


See Yourself At Target
Employing more than 270,000 team members in 47 states, we value creativity, diversity and collaboration in all its forms. From stocking our stores' shelves with fantastic products at great prices to a deep commitment to community giving, Target strives for excellence in every area.

Purpose:
As an Assets Protection Investigator, you will develop and execute plans to address Financial Risks (Organized Theft, Fraud, and Significant Internal Dishonesty) in moderately high-risk markets. Develop and execute investigations and tactics that address identified financial risks. Investigate and resolve instances of Organized Retail Theft, Fraud, and Major Internal Cases. Provide crisis response support to market stores for significant business disruptions (robbery, protest). Recruit and develop market investigators. Coordinate investigations and intelligence with NIS, FIS, SCIT and SIT.


See Yourself:
Analyzing by using provided data (financials), criminal intelligence, and resources to focus investigative efforts to identify and resolve financial risk related to theft and fraud in assigned markets. Gathers and documents critical information and intelligence for input to market and national criminal databases and information management efforts

Deveolping and implementing investigative plans and tactics that effectively address the market's financial risk identified through analysis. Uses available intelligence, tools and resources to identify, investigate, and resolve market level cases involving organized theft, fraud (ORT), and significant internal dishonesty. Gathers evidence to support criminal prosecution and civil remedy of identified criminal activity. Documents all investigative activity in a manner that ensures the proper recording and appropriate resolution of case. Presents cases to Law Enforcement, Prosecution authority and/or Human Resources for adjudication. Ensures the proper final resolution of cases including recovery for the corporation in terms of civil remedies or restitution.

Leading market wide effort combating OTF. Provides guidance and direction to store AP teams concerning investigative plans and cases. Coaches and develops Associate Investigators in development and execution of criminal investigations. Responds to market stores during crisis situations to provide support and lead investigative efforts to facilitate investigation and resolution efforts with Law Enforcement. Trains Store and AP teams on the impact of OTF and preventative actions and awareness.

Establishing market wide communication to gather criminal intelligence and coordinate market investigations operations and investigations. Ensures store APTLs, APSs, and TPSs know and understand what constitutes intelligence and are documenting and communicating effectively. Coordinates investigations with NIS, FIS, SCIT, and SIT to ensure the appropriate resources are addressing the issue. Maintains close communication and coordination with Law Enforcement concerning market issues and criminal trends. Establishes and maintains market wide communication with Store leadership to ensure understanding of current market issues, results, and preventative actions. Trains high-risk stores as it relates to OTF and preventative awareness. Establishes and maintains partnership with Retail/Law Enforcement associations to disseminate/coordinate intelligence and share current trends and issues.


Minimum Requirements:
* Three to five years investigative experience
* Strong oral and written communication skills
* Strong analytical skills
* Systems application aptitude (PC and mainframe applications)
* Able to work independently
* Proven track record of successful criminal case resolution
* Understanding of law enforcement and private security


Desired Requirements:
* Four year degree
* Supervisor experience
* Awareness of industry and governmental investigative agencies and ability to work within agency protocol
* Five years of retail assets protection or related law enforcement experience


See The Rewards
Eligible team members will receive one of the best earnings packages anywhere, including competitive pay, all-around insurance coverage, 401(k), flexible scheduling, training and development and many other perks and benefits. See a place of exciting challenges and rewards. See a place where you'll feel empowered to do something brilliant. See a place filled with creativity and unlimited opportunity. See a place where 'work' could easily be called play. To apply, visit our careers Web site at Target.com/careers to view all career opportunities. See yourself here. Target is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer and is a Drug-Free Workplace.

==============================================

Executive Team Leader - Assets Protection - Michigan
Company Target Stores


See Yourself At Target See a company like no other.

We're a company living a clear vision; to be the best. In every area of our business. In everything we do.

Our nationwide channel of retail stores, distribution centers, and corporate offices offer you thousands of opportunities to join our diverse team and bring your best.
Imagine A Career In Store Assets Protection

As a team member of the Assets Protection team in Target stores, you'll help create a safe, secure environment for guests and team members through your work on shortage control, safeness, and theft and fraud control.
Job Description Purpose

As an Executive Team Leader - Assets Protection, you'll supervise and administer our Assets Protection programs, upholding the reliability of your store's security measures at every step. In addition, you'll build and develop your store's Assets Protection team to ensure these programs are carried out accurately and consistently, creating a positive shopping experience for our guests and a safe work environment for our team.

See Yourself:
• Keeping our stores safe and secure against loss
• Maintaining team member awareness of stock shortage programs
• Fostering awareness of internal theft among store team members
• Initiating investigations and interviews when losses occur
• Implementing and maintaining shoplifter prevention programs
• Directing and participating in the detection, apprehension and processing of shoplifters
• Hiring, training and supervising the Assets Protection team and ensuring maximum coverage to the store through proper scheduling
• Following through on all mandated safety programs to reduce losses
• Maintaining positive working relationships with local political, educational and law enforcement officials and agencies

Job Requirements

Minimum Requirements:
• High school diploma or equivalent; college degree preferred
• Two or more years investigative and/or other retail experience
• Experience in conducting interviews
• Ability to work with highly confidential information
• Ability to move about all areas of the store quickly and without attracting attention, including climbing ladders and maneuvering in and out of confined areas
• Ability to apprehend and confront guests and team members in a calm, professional and diplomatic manner
• Flexible work hours including some nights and weekends
• Knowledge of Target information systems and all aspects of Assets Protection, including internal investigations and the use of electronic detection equipment
See The Rewards Eligible team members will receive one of the best earnings packages anywhere, including competitive pay, all-around insurance coverage, 401(k), flexible scheduling, training and development and many other perks and benefits. See a place of exciting challenges and rewards. See a place where you'll feel empowered to do something brilliant. See a place filled with creativity and unlimited opportunity. See a place where 'work' could easily be called play. See yourself here. Target is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer and is a drug-free workplace.

================================================

Positions At Target

• Minimize theft and fraud while maximizing safeness
• Cultivate effective partnerships with law enforcement, community
agencies and Target team members
• Provide a clean, safe shopping environment for guests and fellow team members



BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE
Think ahead, move forward. As part of the Business Intelligence group you will collect and analyze competitive intelligence to support the Enterprise Risk Management teams, as well as keep AP initiatives in sync with overall Target strategies.

COMPLIANCE, PLANNING AND ANALYSIS
Help make sure that Target's Assets Protection group is the fastest, smartest and most effective in the industry. This team develops processes, identifies sourcing opportunities, and measures the awareness and effectiveness of AP efforts.

CORPORATE INVESTIGATIONS AND FORENSIC SERVICES
The Target AP Forensic Lab evaluates and provides analysis of scientific evidence for Target investigations teams and law enforcement. Currently, the lab provides video- and computer-forensic services.

CORPORATE SECURITY
Be part of the security service team that ensures adequate protection of Target team members, physical assets and corporate facilities. Opportunities include Manager of Corporate Security and Executive Protection and Corporate Security Supervisor positions.

FINANCIAL INVESTIGATION
Like your detective work by the numbers? This group develops process, analyzes data and investigates financial fraud to create a trustworthy transaction environment. Opportunities include Group Team Leader, Team Leader, Process Leader, Process Owner, Analyst, Investigations Coordinator and Investigations Associate positions.

GOVERNMENT AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS
Create a unified front against the complex forces that create theft or unsafe situations. This team works with law enforcement and local community leaders, and it creates other partnerships that maximize safeness and profitability for Target. Opportunities include Manager and Process Owner positions.

INVESTIGATIONS
Dig in and make a difference as you research, investigate, analyze and resolve organized internal and external retail theft and fraud. Opportunities include Regional Team Leader, Investigations Team Leader, Senior Investigator, Investigator, Investigative Technician and Investigative Analyst positions.

MERCHANDISE PROTECTION
As part of the Merchandise Protection team, you'll collaborate with outside partners to create common protection standards for high-theft merchandise.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Like the satisfaction of getting the job done? The Project Management team identifies technology to meet business needs while developing processes that support safeness and reduce theft and fraud. Opportunities include Manager, Process Leader and Project Coordinator/Business User Coordinator positions.

SAFENESS
The best defense is a good team member—like you. If you're interested in preventing harm to guests, communities, facilities and fellow team members, this is the team for you.

STORE OPERATIONS
Support from HQ is absolutely necessary to ensure the success of AP initiatives; as a member of the Store Operations group, you'll develop efficient, effective programs and tools to support store team members.




Target Headquarters in Minneapolis, Minnesota

====================================================


Posted by Target Stores Suck at 8:47 PM



Friday, September 1, 2006
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Saturday, January 28, 2006
GIFT CARD SCAM - Still Going Strong!
============================================
GIFT CARD SCAM
Wal-Mart Hit By Gift Card Scam

June 10, 2004

By Connie Thompson


SEATTLE - Thieves have found a way to secretly cash out your gift card before you have a chance to go shopping.

The biggest target so far is the nation's largest retailer: Wal-Mart.

We uncovered the problem after tips from local consumers.

Wal-Mart won't say much. A spokesman in Arkansas characterizes it as a "small issue in some pockets of the country."

But police are investigating, and if you use gift cards, you need to know about this.

"You think it's safe to give someone a gift card!" said Tami Kegley, who contacted us after she and her church group chipped in for a $150 gift card at a Wal-Mart in Bonney Lake. Tami had put the purchase on her credit card.

The shopping card, as Wal-Mart calls it, was a gift for a colleague.

"She loaded up her cart and took it up there and they said there was nothing on the card," she said.

The same thing happened to Carol Kent and her husband with a $25 card at the Wal-Mart in Puyallup.

Carol: "She said 'I'm sorry, but there's a zero balance on this.' And we're like, 'What?!' She ran it again and she said, 'No, I'm sorry. It's already been cashed out.' "

Carol's shopping card was purchased in Olympia, and days later, cashed out by a stranger at the Wal-Mart in Chehalis even though Carol still had the card.

"Here's my receipt," Carol points to the shopping card notation at the bottom which reads: "Shop card reception 0.00"

In Tami's case, her receipt shows the $150.00 card was activated at 11:32 in the morning, then cashed out three hours later in a another state!

"At a store in California," Tami explained. "He (the Wal-Mart employee) wasn't sure how it was being done, but he told me it had happened several times through that same store in California."

Wal-Mart acknowledges the scam, but for security reasons will not discuss details.

A corporate spokesman says the company, " is working with law enforcement at the highest levels possible, to rectify the problem and catch the people responsible."

As for making good on the stolen money?

"Well initially he told me that he really couldn't do anything for me," Tami Kegley says of the Wal-Mart employee she dealt with. "He said it was a corporate issue."

But Tami persisted, and got finally got the $150.00. Carol also got her money back.

"And they said they're working on it, and that there's been a couple memos on it throughout Wal-Mart," Carol said.

Wal-Mart won't go into how this is happening, but assures us it has extra security measures in place.

One other national retailer reports an isolated incident of the same scam in Michigan and the employee involved was caught.

Wal-Mart says if you learn your card has been hit, you should have no problem getting your money as long as you have the receipt to verify the transaction. The receipts record the exact date, time and code number of the card transaction, as well as codes showing where the cards were both purchased and redeemed.

========================================

January 19, 2006]


Retailers on guard against gift card fraud

(Dallas Morning News, The (KRT) Via Thomson Dialog NewsEdge) DALLAS _ Now that holiday gift card givers have handed out billions in plastic presents, the scam artists are as busy as Christmas elves.

Gift card fraud _ be it a simple sleight of hand or elaborate techno thievery _ is on the rise, experts say. As the use of gift cards grows, so does their attractiveness to crooks. Consumers bought an estimated $18.5 billion in gift cards this holiday season, up 6.6 percent from 2004

Retailers and restaurateurs are working with trade groups, processors and law enforcement to spot and stop the latest scams without making the system too burdensome for legitimate consumers.

"Gift card fraud is a growing concern among retailers nationwide," said Joseph LaRocca, vice president of loss prevention for the National Retail Federation, an industry trade group.

"Gift cards are being used as mainstream currency among retailers, from fast-food restaurants to major department stores."

In fact, restaurateurs, although later to the gift card game than their retailing cousins, represent a rapidly growing group of gift card sellers.

Major retailers continue to dominate, with a 70 percent share of gift cards purchased.

But restaurants accounted for 12 percent of gift cards purchased in 2005, more than double the 5 percent reported two years before, according to First Data Corp., which processes electronic transactions.

Since so many gift cards are given during the holidays, January and February become prime months for gift card redemption, by consumers and thieves.

Experts describe gift card fraud as a small part of the overall $31 billion in retail "shrink." The catch-all term includes everything from employee theft to vendor fraud at retail stores, not including restaurants.

"When you look at that number, the gift card fraud losses that I'm aware of are minuscule," LaRocca said.

He and others said they've not seen solid numbers that can quantify the problem.

"There isn't a lot of good data," said Richard Hollinger, a criminology professor at the University of Florida who produces the annual National Retail Security Survey. "Companies have private data on the extent to which they're having a problem."

But many of those companies, wary of tipping off thieves and scaring off customers, are secretive about their fraud losses and prevention tactics. Several restaurant companies declined to comment for this article due to security concerns.

Experts said they see the problem as significant and growing _ and the thieves as increasingly sophisticated.

"Each of the various retail companies has investigative teams that are working on this," Hollinger said, adding that the FBI gets involved in cracking some scams.

Gift card fraud can take various forms _ and each presents challenges for the companies that get into the gift card game.

The easiest to pull off is the simple sleight of hand. The store clerk or restaurant server hands you a card that you think has value when it doesn't, then pockets the real card.

That fraud is harder for diners at sit-down restaurants to immediately detect because the card leaves their sight.

Increasingly, Hollinger said, gift card fraud is tied to organized shoplifting. Thieves steal merchandise and bring it back for a refund, sans receipt.

Many retailers now put refunds on gift cards, which can then be marketed via online auction sites.

LaRocca calls that "e-fencing."

That fraud affects retailers more than restaurants since consumers rarely return cheeseburgers.

But all industry segments are on the alert _ and on the offensive.

To fight back, retailers, restaurateurs and the transaction processing industry are stepping up monitoring of gift card sales and redemptions, in some cases requiring a manager's approval for a sale.

Others create extensive databases that key in on unusual transactions or patterns involving the same person or group.

"We track things, looking for strange activity," such as the frequency with which money is put onto a card and then taken off, said Andrew Robbins, president of Paytronix Systems Inc. in Cambridge, Mass., which helps restaurants run their gift card programs.

"We try to find the people who are doing that the most," he said.

People are going to find a way to cheat, said Tamara Jones, vice president of business services for Plano, Texas-based Metromedia Restaurant Group, speaking at a recent restaurant technology conference.

"But the reporting is such that you can narrow it down to the server," she said.

Concerns about thievery have not been enough to keep growing numbers of restaurateurs and retailers out of the game.

"Most often, they have a big concern up front about fraud, then when they start looking at the upside, it more than outweighs any issue about fraud," said Adam de Malignon, sales director for Gift Card Solutions, a Salt Lake City provider of paper and electronic gift products and services.

Merchants like gift cards because they can increase sales (consumers often spend more than the card's value), bring in first-time customers, build brand awareness and, if the customer registers the card online, serve as a marketing tool.

"I've seen ... (wariness) delay people, but they see there's too much money to be made," he said.

--------------------------------------------------


GIFT CARD SCAMS?

I've been hearing from people about how gift cards from businesses can easily be scammed, but I just don't see how that can be done. I mean, they're not activated until you buy them, and then they're just stored-value cards, right? Can you explain?

Well, I don't know that I want to get the reputation of being an expert criminal mastermind, but I did recently read about one ingenious method by which companies like Wal-Mart, Target and The Gap are encountering problems with their gift cards.
The key is that gift cards each have a unique serial number in the magnetic strip and then the gift card management system uses a centralized computer to track outstanding balances and usage.

Without any scams involved, it works great and if you know the unique ID number of your card, you can even call up and report it stolen, without losing any of the remaining balance.

The problem arises when you realize that small handheld mag-strip scanners are inexpensive and easily acquired. Now imagine this: a criminal has one of these devices in his (or her) pocket and walks into a store that offers these plastic gift cards.

They grab a big handful of cards as if they're a big spender, wander into a quiet corner (or a dressing room), then quickly scan each and every card to record their unique ID numbers. Then they're done with the cards so they put them back on the display or leave them on a shelf for an unsuspecting employee to put away.

Now that afternoon you innocently traipse into the store and pick up one of these tainted cards, "charging it" with $500 for your sweetie.

That's where the problem arises. The criminal can easily buy a gift card and charge it with $5, then reprogram the mag strip to match your card ID number (which they'd previous scanned and stored) and merrily shop until your balance goes to zero.

Now, how would they know when your card is activated and how much is left on it? Because all of these stores that offer plastic gift cards also offer a system where you can check your card balance via telephone with just the ID number. Every 4-5 days the criminal checks the balance on their stack of card IDs, and once one goes golden, they either start shopping or, worse, perhaps offer it for sale on a site like eBay.

Either way, I'm not sure that I'd be purchasing plastic gift cards for any of my friends with this sort of exploit so relatively simple. There are better and safer ways of sharing your affections.
===================================




Posted by Target Stores Suck at 9:01 AM 0 comments



Friday, January 27, 2006
Interesting Links F.Y.I.=
Interesting Links F.Y.I. -
==================
http://www.myspace.com/targetsecuritymanual
http://www.thesmokinggun.com/
http://groups.msn.com/TargetAPDirectives2006/_whatsnew.msnw
http://www.retailworker.com/forum
http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/TargetSucks/?yguid=262065473
http://bullseyebb.awardspace.com/index.php
http://www.targetunion.org/

http://groups.msn.com/ABUSEDBYWALMART/home
http://www.retail-worker.com/forum/index.php
http://breakroomnews.com/breakroom/index.php
http://www.youareworthmore.org/forum
http://blog.wakeupwalmart.com/ufcw/2006/06/walmarts_latest_1.html

http://www.wallyworldsucks.com/
http://www.walmart-blows.com/forum/index.php?sid=b934681dc89ad9f7a0384e21afb6b7ff

http://www.walmartcrimereport.com/report.pdf
http://www.lawrencegoetz.com/programs/ipinfo/
http://www.faegre.com/
http://www.archive.org/index.php
http://www.congress.org/congressorg/home/
http://targetstoressuck.blogspot.com/
http://kelseysigurdur.blogspot.com/
http://www.bop.gov/iloc2/LocateInmate.jsp
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/credit/fdc.htm

http://www.findlaw.com/
http://www.onlinedmv.com/index.html
http://nolo.com/
http://lawcrawler.findlaw.com/scripts/lc.pl?entry=open+records&search=Search%21&sites=findlaw
http://governmentguide.com/main.adp

http://people.tribe.net/2705db96-e5f6-4c63-99e8-47aa09fdab8a/blog/1c3cccad-b0c6-4886-a0c5-86fe9049ff9a

http://www.consumerist.com/consumer/target/target-targets-blogger-201306.php
http://www.noturnonred.org/ http://www.myspace.com/targetsecuritymanual

29 Page 'Is Wal Mart Safe' - Crime Report -
http://www.walmartcrimereport.com/report.pdf
A good copy of the "Directives" on this site. -
http://www.myspace.com/targetsecuritymanual
A Retail Store Blog -
http://www.noturnonred.org/index.php/2006/09/19/suit-blogger-posted-target-trade-secrets
A seperate blog with the Directives -
http://targetstoressuck.blogspot.com/
A Target Site, but only 100 members -
http://bullseyebb.awardspace.com/index.php
Anti Wal Mart Site w/11,000 Users -
http://www.wallyworldsucks.com/

Anti Wal Mart Site, 4500 members -
http://www.walmart-blows.com/forum/index.php?sid=b934681dc89ad9f7a0384e21afb6b7ff
Anti Wal-Mart message board w/8 pages of links -
http://groups.msn.com/ABUSEDBYWALMART/home
Anti Wal-Mart Site -
http://www.walmart-blows.com/forum/index.php?sid=b934681dc89ad9f7a0384e21afb6b7ff
Anti Wal-Mart Site - Worth a Look -
http://walmartwatch.com/

AP/LP Site -
http://www.retailspy.com/
Attorney for Target Stores - Ms. K L Bundy -
http://www.faegre.com/lawyer_bio.aspx?pid=7371
Buy Target Sucks T-Shirts, mugs, magnets, etc -
http://www.cafepress.com/targetsucks
Consumer Site - Look up your least favorite retail chain and see the complaints! -
www.badbusinessbureau.com

===========================================



New Wally World Shoplifting Policy!



Here is the 29 page report and the recent article about Wally World's new Shoplifting policy:

http://www.walmartcrimereport.com/report.pdf

-------------------------------------------------------

Some Leeway for the Small Shoplifter

By Michael Barbaro - New York Times
Thursday, July, 13 2006

Wal-Mart refuses to carry smutty magazines. It will not sell compact discs with obscene lyrics. And when it catches customers shoplifting - even a pair of socks or a pack of cigarettes - it prosecutes them.

But now, in a rare display of limited permissiveness, Wal-Mart is letting thieves off the hook - at least in cases involving $25 or less.

According to internal documents, the company, the nation's largest retailer and leading destination for shoplifting, will no longer prosecute first-time thieves unless they are between 18 and 65 and steal merchandise worth at least $25, putting the chain in line with the policies of many other retailers.

Under the new policy, a shoplifter caught trying to swipe, say, a DVD of the movie "Basic Instinct 2" ($16.87) would receive a warning, but one caught walking out of the store with "E.R. - The Complete Fifth Season" ($32.87) would face arrest.

Wal-Mart said the change would allow it to focus on theft by professional shoplifters and its own employees, who together steal the bulk of merchandise from the chain every year, rather than the teenager who occasionally takes a candy bar from the checkout counter.

It may also serve to placate small-town police departments across the country who have protested what the company has called its zero-tolerance policy on shoplifting. Employees summoned officers whether a customer stole a $5 toy or a $5,000 television set - anything over $3, the company said.

At some of the chain's giant 24-hour stores, the police make up to six arrests a day prompting a handful of departments to hire an additional officer just to deal with the extra workload.

"I had one guy tied up at Wal-Mart every day," said Don Zofchak, chief of police in South Strabane Township, Pa., which has 9,000 residents and 16 officers. He said the higher threshold for prosecution "would help every community to deal with this."

J. P. Suarez, who is in charge of asset protection at Wal-Mart, said it was no longer efficient to prosecute petty shoplifters. "If I have somebody being paid $12 an hour processing a $5 theft, I have just lost money," he said. "I have also lost the time to catch somebody stealing $100 or an organized group stealing $3,000."

The changes in Wal-Mart's theft policy are described in 30 pages of documents that were provided to The New York Times by WakeUpWalMart.com, a group backed by unions that have tried to organize Wal-Mart workers in the United States.

The group said it received the document from a former employee at the chain who is unhappy with the new policy.

In interviews, several current and former Wal-Mart employees said the new shoplifting policy undermines their work and would, over time, encourage more shoplifting at the chain.

But Wal-Mart said it would closely track shoplifters it did not have arrested, and would ask that they be prosecuted after a second incident. (Under the new policy, it will also seek the prosecution of all suspected shoplifters who threaten violence or fail to produce identification, no matter how much they are trying to steal. Not carrying identification is a popular tactic among professional shoplifters to avoid arrest.)

"There is not a lot of margin for success for those intent on making a living stealing from us," Mr. Suarez said. "We will put them in jail just as we always have."

Still, the new policy, which became effective in March, is in many ways a striking departure from Wal-Mart traditions. In the past, the company has proudly defended its aggressive prosecution of shoplifters, saying it helps hold down prices.

"Other retailers might offset the cost of shoplifting with higher prices," a spokeswoman said in a 2004 interview. "But we don't do that."

Indeed, Wal-Mart's zero-tolerance policy can be traced to its founder, Sam Walton, who tied employee bonuses to low theft rates at stores. Stolen merchandise, he wrote in his autobiography published in 1992, the year he died, "is one of the biggest enemies of profitability in the retail business."

Over all, American retailers lose more than $30 billion a year to theft, according to the National Retail Federation, a trade group.

In the book, "Sam Walton: Made in America," Mr. Walton boasted that the amount of merchandise lost to theft at Wal-Mart was half that of the retailing industry's average.

With the new policy, though, employees "are confused," said a former Wal-Mart employee who worked in the loss prevention department at a store outside San Jose, Calif..

"They want to stop shoplifters," she said. "They want to do what they are trained to do."

But if the shoplifter is under 18 or steals less than $25 worth of products, "they can't do anything," said the former employee, who left the company shortly after the new shoplifting policy was put into effect and spoke on condition of anonymity because she said she feared retribution.

Chris Kofinis, director of communications at WakeUpWalMart.com, said the policy "is a head-in-the-sand strategy that is far different than what Sam Walton would ever have wanted, and it's not clear this is the best strategy for Wal-Mart workers."

Mr. Suarez, the Wal-Mart executive, said there was "overwhelming" employee support for the new policy because it would more effectively deter theft.

Wal-Mart is not alone in giving shoplifters some leeway. Its new policy "is consistent with guidelines many retailers use," said Joseph J. LaRocca, vice president for loss prevention at the National Retail Federation.

Retailers, he said, have learned that prosecuting small shoplifting cases "does not warrant the store resources or the judicial resources required, given the dollar amount that was stolen."

In some cases, loss prevention executives said, retailers will prosecute only shoplifters who steal at least $50 or $100 worth of merchandise. The legal costs required for prosecution, they said, are simply too high. Stores must hire a lawyer for employees who become witnesses in a trial, for example, and pay workers overtime to appear in court.

Until now, they said, Wal-Mart was the exception. "They would arrest somebody for stealing a pair of socks," said Chief Zofchak in South Strabane Township. "I felt we were spending an inordinate amount of time just dealing with Wal-Mart."

Since Wal-Mart enforced its new shoplifting policy, arrests have fallen at the store in Harrisville, Utah, according to authorities there. But the town's chief of police, Maxwell Jackson, still prefers the original zero-tolerance rule.

"Once the word goes out that there is a dollar limit," he said, "there will be more stealing.


================================


Wal-Mart's Shocking New Shoplifting Policy

Revealed by WakeUpWalMart.com

Our latest press release:

CONCERNED WORKERS QUESTION WAL-MART'S SHIFT FROM 'ZERO-TOLERANCE' TO 'MORE PERMISSIVE' ON SHOPLIFTING POLICY

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, www.WakeUpWalMart.com , as reported by the New York Times, revealed a new internal document which detailed Wal-Mart's recent changes to the company's shoplifting policies.

The new changes abandon Sam Walton's policy of 'zero-tolerance,' in favor of a new policy which tells workers not to stop shoplifters for items under $25. The internal Wal-Mart policy document was given to WakeUpWalmart.com by a former Wal-Mart worker who is deeply concerned with the negative effect this policy will have on other Wal-Mart workers, the company, and the community.

According to the internal Wal-Mart document, the new shoplifting policy has changed from "Shoplifter Apprehensions" to "Investigation and Detention of Shoplifters." In particular, the new shoplifting document explains to Wal-Mart workers that "the guidelines for prosecution of shoplifters have changed: the retail value of the merchandise recovered must exceed $25, and the suspected shoplifter must be at or between the ages of 18 and 65."


The change in shoplifting policy is a dramatic departure from Sam Walton's policies. Sam Walton believed shoplifting was "one of the biggest enemies of profitability in the retail business," and even linked employee bonuses to reducing the shrinkage in each Wal-Mart store.

"Wal-Mart has truly forgotten where it came from. Instead of valuing workers, Wal-Mart is brutally restructuring the company by cutting hours for hundreds of thousands of loyal employees which is negatively impacting customer service and destroying worker morale. Now, Wal-Mart has gone one step further. Instead of addressing the serious issue of crime at Wal-Mart stores, Wal-Mart is abandoning Sam Walton's zero tolerance and is now letting some shoplifters go," said Paul Blank, campaign director for WakeUpWalMart.com.

The shift in Wal-Mart's shoplifting policy follows widespread reports from Wal-Mart workers, many in the Loss Prevention Division, who have witnessed deep cuts, scheduling changes, and other restructuring at Wal-Mart stores. In fact, as reported in the New York Times, J.P. Suarez, Wal-Mart's Loss Prevention director admits the company is making these changes as a cost-saving measure. As Suarez states "it was no longer efficient to prosecute petty shoplifters, 'If I have somebody being paid $12 an hour processing a $5 theft, I have just lost money'," he said. "I have also lost the time to catch somebody stealing $100 or an organized group stealing $3,000."

Wal-Mart's change in shoplifting policy also follows the well-publicized release by WakeUpWalMart.com of a study of police call incidents at Wal-Mart stores. The study, entitled "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" analyzed the official 2004 police incident reports (i.e. calls for police service) at 551 Wal-Mart store locations. According to the study, based on the number of reported police incidents for the sample, it is estimated police responded to nearly 1 million police incidents at Wal-Mart in 2004 costing taxpayers $77 million annually.

WakeUpWalMart.com is a national grassroots movement of 245,000 Americans who have joined together to change Wal-Mart into a responsible and moral corporation.








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Crime and Wal-Mart — "Is Wal-Mart Safe?"

An Analysis of Official Police Incidents at Wal-Mart Stores

May 1, 2006

WakeUpWalMart.com

Washington, DC

2

"Crime in our parking lots was on a rapid increase in many areas of region ten, Florida, and it was evident from customer count and sales in the evening hours, that people were becoming afraid to visit our stores during those hours."

Tom Rinehart, Wal-Mart, 1996

Summary

One of the most important issues raised by citizen groups and local communities in the growing public

debate about Wal-Mart is whether or not a relationship exists between Wal-Mart stores and crime.1 In the

last few years, anecdotal news accounts of crimes at Wal-Mart stores or parking lots, coupled with statements made by law enforcement, have raised a public concern that Wal-Mart stores may be, as one court has described it, a "magnet for crime" (See Appendix B).

The following study, titled "Is Wal-Mart Safe?," is the first nationally available study to evaluate this important issue. The first phase of this study analyzes police incident reports (calls for service) associated with 551 Wal-Mart stores and provides an estimate of both the average rate of reported total incidents per

store and reported "serious or violent" incidents per store (See Appendix A). This study is also the first

available report that compares and contrasts the average rate of reported police incidents at "high incident"

Wal-Mart stores with the average rate of reported police incidents at nearby Target stores.

The study further estimates the cost to taxpayers and local communities associated with policing Wal-Mart

stores. Finally, our estimate of what it would cost for Wal-Mart to adopt roving security patrols at all stores

is provided.

Among the critical findings of the "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" study:

?? Wal-Mart stores experience a significant number of police incidents. In 2004, police received

148, 331 calls for service for the 551 Wal-Mart stores analyzed;

?? The average number of reported incidents per store for the 551 stores analyzed was 269;

?? The Wal-Mart stores in our sample that reported the most incidents in 2004 experienced higher

average rates of reported police incidents than nearby Target stores;

?? Based on the average rate of reported incidents for the 551 Wal-Mart stores analyzed in this study,

we estimate that in 2004 police may have received almost 1 million calls for service at Wal-Mart

stores or parking lots – or 2 reported police incidents per minute in 2004;

?? Nationally, Wal-Mart stores cost local taxpayers an estimated $77 million in increased policing

costs in 2004;

?? Wal-Mart could implement roving security patrols at all stores nationwide at an estimated cost of

4 cents per monthly customer visit.

Each of the 551 police reports used in the "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" study is available for download and review

at WalMartCrimeReport.com.2

1 Unless otherwise indicated, a reference to incidents at a Wal-Mart means incidents at a Wal-Mart property, including

a Wal-Mart parking lot.

2 The police incident reports used for this study are official records of the number of times police were called to

respond to an incident (calls for service) at a Wal-Mart property. The reported incidents run the gamut from calls to

assist a motorist locked out of a car to calls to investigate a homicide. The police reports did not reflect the outcome of

these calls for service or the precise location of the incident. Thus, for example, a police report indicating a call for

3

Introduction: Wal-Mart Stores and Public Safety

At the end of 2005, Wal-Mart ranked #2 on the Fortune 500 with sales of over $312 billion and net profits

of $11.2 billion. Wal-Mart is also the nation's largest retailer with over 3,857 stores and a customer base

estimated by the company at 151 million visits per week - with women consumers representing 70 percent

of all Wal-Mart customers. Wal-Mart has also announced plans to open 1,500 new stores over the next five

years or roughly 300 news stores each year between 2006 and 2010. At the end of 2005, Wal-Mart's 3,857

stores were located in 2,183 cities and/or towns across all 50 states.3 In sum, Wal-Mart is a significant and

powerful social and economic force both nationwide and in the very fabric of thousands of American

communities.

Wal-Mart's ambitious plans for growth, however, have faced an increasing degree of public opposition

from citizen groups who oppose plans to expand or open new Wal-Mart stores in their communities. Based

on news articles, in the last two years, community groups in over 204 cities and towns have organized to

oppose new Wal-Mart openings or the expansion of current Wal-Mart stores.

In opposing Wal-Mart expansion or growth, so-called "site fight" groups point to various concerns,

including increased traffic, congestion, sprawl, as well as crime. In particular, the questions about the

relationship between incidents of crime and Wal-Mart stores raises concerns among site fight groups about

the adverse impact a new or current Wal-Mart store could have on a community's quality of life, overall

public safety, and local policing.4

The following research study, titled "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" is the first national study to examine the average

rate of reported calls for service at or near Wal-Mart stores. The "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" study is based on a

detailed analysis of local police incident reports (calls for service) covering 551 Wal-Mart stores in 434

cities and 30 states.5 The stores were chosen randomly based on a sample of 1,004 Wal-Mart stores that

were open for all of 2004.6 The primary findings of this study are based only on the police reports

associated with these 551 stores.

service at a Wal-Mart address could reflect an incident in a store or in the parking lot. In some instances, however, the

nature of the crime, such as auto theft, provides insight into the location of the incident (see Appendix A).

3 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., SEC Filing, Form 10-K, Fiscal Year 2006; Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., presentation, January 2005;

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., "United States Operations Data Sheet March 2006," at www.walmartfacts.com March 2, 2006;

Parija Bhatnagar, "Wal-Mart mea culpa: 'We're human beings'," CNNMoney.com, June 3, 2005; Wal-Mart Store

Listings 2005, Trade Dimensions Data.

4

For example see Sprawl-Busters "Home Town America Fights Back":

http://www.sprawl-busters.com/search.php?SRCHrecent=1

5 In 2005, we requested from police departments lists of all incidents reported (calls for service) at Wal-Mart addresses

over the last two years, organized by date and type of incident to which police responded. In total, we received

information for 582 stores in 30 states. Because we analyzed only those Wal-Mart stores that were open for all of

2004, and because we received some of the reports after we began our analysis, 31 stores were ultimately excluded

from the sample. Wal-Mart reported that it had 3,551 stores (3,013 Wal-Mart stores and 538 Sam's Clubs) open in the

US in January 2004.

6

This initial analysis focuses only on 2004 police incident report data associated with Wal-Mart addresses. The

considerable time needed to request, organize, and analyze over 10,000 pages of data took up much of 2005. Future

research will analyze all stores open as of 2005, as well as to compare 2004 and 2005 incident reports.

4

The "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" study is divided into the following sections:

(a) Public statements made by police officials and communities concerning the perceived

relationship between Wal-Mart stores and crime;

(b) The average rate of reported police incidents among Wal-Mart stores, both on a per store

basis and estimated nationwide;

(c) The average rate of reported "serious or violent" police incidents per Wal-Mart store

(d) A comparison of reported police incidents at a cross-section of Wal-Mart and Target stores;

(e) The estimated cost to taxpayers for police work associated with responding to calls for service

at or near Wal-Mart stores, both per store and nationwide;

(f) A comparison of the estimated cost to taxpayers for reported police incidents at or near Wal-

Marts versus nearby Target stores;

(g) The estimated cost to Wal-Mart for providing security patrols at all Wal-Mart stores, both for

Wal-Mart and on a per customer basis.

A. Wal-Mart and Crime: Public Statements by Local Officials

In 2001, Justice Larry Starcher of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals stated that "a quick

search of reported cases reveals that Wal-Mart parking lots are a virtual magnet for crime."7 In addition,

many police officials have discussed the impact of having to respond to calls for service at Walmart

properties.

For example, police chiefs and police officials from cities as diverse as Epping, NH; Moraine, OH; and

Harrisville, UT, have described the relationship between Wal-Mart stores and crime.

?? South Strabane, PA: Police Chief Don Zofchak met with Wal-Mart officials in 2004 trying to

reduce their calls to the police. "Frankly, it was unbearable…. I've got 26 square miles and God

knows how many other businesses to deal with. Their requests or demands for service,

proportionally, were overwhelming." [Pittsburgh Post Gazette, March 27, 2005]

?? North Lebanon, PA: Police Chief Kim Wolfe said that, "If we had known the number of calls

[from Wal-Mart], we probably would have considered an increase in officers…. We just had no

idea what it would be like. It doesn't matter what time of the day or night; we get calls there." [The

Lebanon Daily News, January 27, 2005]

?? West Sadsbury, PA: Police Chief John F. Slauch said that Wal-Mart "has completely changed the

way we do business. It has overwhelmed us at times." [Philadelphia Inquirer, April 12, 2004]

?? Tappahannock, VA: Police Chief James Barrett, said Wal-Mart "is a strain on services. If they

moved out tomorrow, it wouldn't upset me." [St. Petersburg Times, May 20, 2002]

?? Harrisville, UT: Since Wal-Mart opened in Harrisville, UT in early 2001, calls to the police

department have jumped by a third. The number of officers has increased from four to six. The

store's parking lot, where more than half the city's DUIs originate, is now patrolled overnight.

"Our DUIs skyrocketed," said Harrisville Police Officer Nate Thompson, cruising the parking lot

one recent Friday night. "It just went through the roof." [Associated Press, May 7, 2004]

?? Moraine, OH: Police calls almost tripled after a Wal-Mart opened in Moraine, Ohio in 2003.

Moraine public information officer Paul Guess said "We had anticipated, because the store is open

24 hours, that we would have an increase." [Dayton Daily News (Ohio), August 11, 2005]

7 Justice Larry Starcher, writing in the Concurring Opinion in Jane Doe v. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., West Virginia

Supreme Court of Appeals, No. 20612, December 13, 2001.

5

?? Epping, NH: Police Lieutenant Mike Wallace said, "Because there's a lot of time spent at Wal-

Mart, the rest of the town is affected by that…. There's not as much time for direct

patrols…There has to be some kind of relief if they want us to cover them 24 hours a day. [Union

Leader (Manchester, NH), November 16, 2005]

The increased demands of policing Wal-Mart stores have posed serious challenges for communities. Some

of the concerns cited by local communities include increased pressure on community policing, budgetary

pressures, as well as increased concerns over public safety. Again, examples of such concerns were raised

in cities as diverse as Hermantown, MN, Beech Grove, IN, Orlando, FL, Tega Cay, SC, Vista, CA, and

Dallas, TX.

?? Epping, NH: Town officials in Epping, NH turned down Wal-Mart's request to have its store

open 24-hours during the holidays, saying that police calls from the store were already

overburdening the police force. Calls to the police, arrests, and complaints filed at the store in its

first four months of operation led to a 7.5 percent increase in the town's crime rate. [Union Leader

(Manchester NH), May 23, 2004 and Union Leader (Manchester, NH), November 16, 2005]

?? Hermantown, MN: Wal-Mart's plan to expand in Hermantown, MN would increase police calls

for the already understaffed police department. [Duluth News-Tribune, February 20, 2005]

?? Tega Cay, SC: In 2004, three Tega Cay Planning Commission members completed a study that

said a proposed Wal-Mart would bring more crime and traffic than previously thought.

Commission member Don Colangelo said two more Tega Cay police officers would need to be

hired to handle the additional police calls. [The Herald (Rock Hill, S.C.), November 26, 2004.]

?? Beech Grove, IN: Beech Grove, Indiana estimated in 2004 that increased calls from a new Wal-

Mart would necessitate the hiring of an extra police officer budgeted at $75,000. Fishers, IN:

Fishers, Indiana police responded to 292 calls from Wal-Mart in just the first 8 months of 2003.

Greenwood, IN: In 2004, planners in Greenwood, Indiana projected that a new Wal-Mart would

net the city an additional $27,933 a year but had only estimated $5,000 in additional police costs

to come up with that figure. Those projections were off given that Marion County police had to

respond to 511 calls in 2003 at their Wal-Mart. [Indianapolis Star, March 17, 2004]

?? Port Richey, FL: In 2002, Port Richey's Wal-Mart was projected to pay $75,000 in property

taxes for the year. To handle increased police calls, the police department spent $72,275 in

overtime in just the first seven months of its fiscal year. Because of the small size of Port Richey's

police department, sending two officers to Wal-Mart takes up the entire force working on a given

shift. As the number of calls to Wal-Mart rose, police response times increased on other nonemergency

calls. [Tampa Tribune, July 23, 2003]

?? Pineville, NC: In March 2003, town leaders in Pineville, NC turned down a proposed Wal-Mart.

City Planners in Pineville determined that the town would have to hire two additional police

officers to monitor the store and respond to calls there. They estimated the new officers would

cost the town $120,000. An attorney for Wal-Mart stated that the proposed Wal-Mart would have

likely brought the town $100,000 in sales, property, and other taxes. [Charlotte Observer, May 26,

2003]

?? Ephrata, PA: Brad Ortenzi, police detective in Ephrata, PA said in 2003 that Wal-Mart led to a

"drastic increase" in his workload. "Bad checks, use of stolen credit cards. ... During a busy week,

we'll have three to five retail theft arrests, and with each arrest, that ties up an officer who has to

go down, take a person into custody" and follow up with paperwork and possibly a court

appearance. [Sunday News (Lancaster, PA) June 8, 2003]

?? Vista, CA: Mayor Morris Vance cited increased crime at Wal-Mart as taxing local budgets and

policing efforts. "This is a difficult time for this to happen," Mayor Vance said, referring to the

6

city's strapped budget. "We definitely cannot afford more police officers right now. With the

budget, it's hard to keep what we have." [The San Diego Union-Tribune, June 5, 2003]

?? Orlando, FL: In Orlando, the local police blotter indicates that the crime rate in a 5-square-mile

area of MetroWest jumped more than 70 percent in the first year after Wal-Mart's arrival in

August 2001. Traffic accidents rose 31 percent, property crimes 110 percent, robberies 231

percent and car thefts 56 percent, according to the Orlando Police Department. [Orlando Sentinel,

January 27, 2003]

?? Dallas, TX: A 2002 internal Dallas Police Department memo warned that a proposed Wal-Mart

Supercenter would lead to longer response times. [Dallas Morning News, Jun 5, 2002]

?? North Versailles, PA: Calls to Wal-Mart and the development that came with it caused the police

department to have to more than double its size, growing from 10 to 26 officers between 1998 and

2002. [St. Petersburg Times, May 20, 2002]

?? Ankeny, IA: Ankeny police saw a substantial increase in crime once Wal-Mart supersized to a

207,000-square-foot store in September 1999. Police records show that crimes such as

shoplifting, theft, forgery and counterfeiting increased 74 percent in 2000 at the Wal-Mart

Supercenter compared with the smaller Wal-Mart that operated in town in 1999. Police Chief Paul

Scranton requested two new officers to deal with increased workloads in 2000 and the city hired a

consultant to study in 2001 whether to hire officers and/or take officers off other duties. [Des

Moines Register, July 22, 2000 and Des Moines Register, November 7, 2001]

B. Analysis of Reported Police Incidents and Wal-Mart Stores

We gathered and analyzed 2004 police incident reports (i.e. calls for service for violent crimes, nonviolent

crimes, and other matters) for 551 Wal-Mart stores that were open for all of 2004. The sample of Wal-Mart

stores analyzed represented 15.5 percent of all U.S. Wal-Marts as of January 2004.8 Police incident reports

were requested, collected, and analyzed from 404 police departments from 434 cities and towns.

According to the police reports analyzed, in 2004, police received a total of 148,331 calls for service at

these 551 Wal-Mart stores.9 The average number of reported police incidents per Wal-Mart store was

269.10

Table 1: Wal-Mart Stores: Average Rate of Reported Police Incidents

Wal-Mart Stores Sampled Number of Reported

Calls for Service in 2004

Average Rate of

Reported Police Incidents

Per Wal-Mart Store in

2004

551

148, 331 269

8 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc, SEC Filing Form 10-K for Fiscal Year 2005

9

We were able to count the total number of incidents reported for 551 of the 582 Wal-Mart stores about which we

received data. We were unable to analyze the other 31 reports because (i) we received them too late for inclusion in the

study, or (ii) the relevant stores were not open for all of 2004.

10 If you removed the five states with the highest number of total police incidents reported, the average rate of police

incidents reported for the remaining 261 Wal-Mart stores in 25 states would be 220 per Wal-Mart store.

7

In terms of geographic distribution, Wal-Mart stores from 30 states were included in the analysis (see Table

2). The five states with the highest number of Wal-Mart's stores analyzed were: California (91), Texas

(69), Florida (68), Illinois (39), and Arizona (34). The five states with the highest number of reported police

incidents, however, were: North Carolina, Arizona, Florida, California and Texas. The 290 stores from

these five "high incident" states accounted for 90,798 of the calls for service at all Wal-Mart stores

analyzed. In 2004, the average rate of reported police incidents at these 290 Wal-Mart stores was 313 per

Wal-Mart store.

Table 2: Reported Police Incidents at Wal-Mart Stores: State by State Breakdown

State

Total Number of

Reported police

incidents # of Wal-Mart Stores

Alabama 155 1

Arizona 10,149 34

California 24,682 91

Colorado 619 3

Connecticut 5,689 25

Florida 23,069 68

Iowa 2,379 8

Illinois 9,294 39

Indiana 306 2

Kansas 2,207 7

Massachusetts 4,676 22

Maryland 2,222 14

Michigan 1,707 10

Minnesota 433 4

Missouri 1,027 3

North Carolina 11,157 28

New Hampshire 743 6

New Jersey 2,367 11

New Mexico 3,468 6

Nevada 672 2

New York 5,660 28

Ohio 6,220 33

Oregon 1,139 6

Pennsylvania 311 3

Rhode Island 1,044 4

Tennessee 1,442 5

Texas 21,741 69

Virginia 148 1

Washington 2,471 11

Wisconsin 1,134 7

Totals 148,331 551

Based on all police reports analyzed, the top ten Wal-Mart stores of the stores we examined with the

highest number of total calls for service were located in ten different cities and from six states - four in

Florida, two in Texas, one in California, one in Ohio, one in Massachusetts, and one in North Carolina (See

Table 3).

8

Table 3: Top Ten Wal-Mart Stores: Total # of 2004 Reported Police Incidents

Address City State Reported Police

Incidents in 2004

9300 N.W. 77th Avenue Hialeah Gardens FL 1875

5100 Okeechobee Road Fort Pierce FL 1593

1505 N. Dale Mabry Hwy Tampa FL 1582

2793 Taylor Road S.W. Reynoldsburg OH 1199

5226 Sigmon Road Wilmington NC 1186

7401 Samuell Blvd Dallas TX 1173

2727 Dunvale Road Houston TX 1123

1950 Auto Center Drive Glendora CA 1001

100 Charlton Road Sturbridge MA 999

19910 Bruce B. Downs Road Tampa FL 996

C. Wal-Mart Stores: Rates of Reported "Violent & Serious Crime"

Police Incidents

460 of the 551 reports we analyzed provided a more detailed explanation of the specific types of police

incidents reported at each store.11 These 460 official police reports were collected from 364 cities and 29

states. This sample of Wal-Mart stores represented 13 percent of all Wal-Mart stores opened as of January

2004.

Based on this detailed sample of official police reports, local police departments responded to a total

number of 122,751 calls for service at the 460 Wal-Mart stores. Again, the police reports did not provide

information on whether or not the reported incident allegedly took place inside the store or in the parking

lot, but the nature of the incidents (e.g., shoplifting) might suggest the location of the incident. While the

detailed data provided by these police reports indicates that a majority of reported police incidents were of

a non-violent or non-serious nature (e.g., shoplifting), a significant number of reported police incidents

involved more "serious or violent crimes."12

Reported "serious or violent" incidents such as rape, attempted rape, murder, and kidnapping, were defined

based on the definitional criteria established by the Federal Bureau of Investigations (see Appendix A).13

Based on the FBI's definitional criteria, in 2004, police were called to respond to a total of 2,909 reports of

"serious or violent crimes" at the 460 Wal-Mart stores we analyzed.14 The most "serious or violent crimes"

11 We were unable to analyze the other 91 reports because (i) we received them too late for this report, (ii) the law

enforcement department did not provide the information necessary to categorize the reported incidents, or (iii) the

departments only provided the sum total of reported incidents.

12 Under the Uniform Crime Reporting codes the FBI says that some crimes "are serious crimes by their nature and/or

volume." In these offenses the FBI includes murder, manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary,

larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. When analyzing serious crimes the FBI also includes simple assault, and

we did as well. [FBI, Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Summary Reporting http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/ucrquest.htm]

13 See Appendix A for definitions of the categories analyzed.

14 Some municipalities include more crimes under the heading of "serious"crime than does the FBI. They include, for

example, weapons law violations and drug/narcotic violations. We also analyzed the data from 460 Wal-Mart stores

for these two categories. Police reported 694 incidents involving drug/narcotics violations at the 460 Wal-Mart stores.

9

that police responded to at this sample of Wal-Mart stores include: four homicides, nine rapes or attempted

rapes, 23 kidnappings or attempted kidnappings, 154 sex crimes, 1,024 auto thefts, and 550 robberies or

attempted robberies (See Table 4). Based on the total number of "serious or violent criminal incidents"

reported, an average of six "serious or violent incidents" were reported per Wal-Mart store in 2004.15

Table 4: Total Number of Reported "Serious or Violent" Incidents at 460 Wal-Mart Stores in 2004

Reported "Serious or Violent Crime" Incident Category Number of Reported Incidents

Assault with a deadly weapon, assault, and battery: 1,145

Auto theft: 1,024

Robbery and attempted robbery: 550

Sex crimes: 154

Kidnapping and attempted kidnapping: 23

Rape and attempted rape: 9

Homicide and attempted homicide16: 4

Among these 460 Wal-Mart stores analyzed, the top ten stores with highest number of "serious or violent"

incidents reported were in Arizona (3), California (4), New Mexico (1), Florida (1), and Texas (1) – (see

Table 5).

Table 5: Top Ten Wal-Marts in 2004 with Reported "Serious or Violent" Police Incidents

Address City State

Total Reported

Incidents

Total Number of "Serious"

Incidents Reported

2020 North 75Th Ave. Phoenix AZ 372 50

3721 East Thomas Road Phoenix AZ 632 47

3661 Truxel Road Sacramento CA 576 40

710 Dennery Road San Diego CA 397 38

2300 White Lane Bakersfield CA 922 35

1607 West Bethany Home Rd Phoenix AZ 513 32

15272 Bear Valley Road Victorville CA 731 32

1107 South Shaver Street Pasadena TX 481 32

1505 N. Dale Mabry Hwy Tampa FL 1582 31

301 San Mateo Blvd SE Albuquerque NM 598 30

Police reported 170 incidents involving weapons law violations at the 460 Wal-Mart stores. Adding these categories to

our analysis would boost the number of "serious" incidents reported to 3,773 at the 460 Wal-Mart stores. See the

following website for a description of all the categories considered "serious" under one state's crime reporting:

www.bci.utah.gov/UCRIBR/PartOne_GroupA.pdf

15 Adding reported police incidents involving drug/narcotics violations and weapons law violations to our analysis

would boost the total number of "serious" incidents reported to 3,773 at the 460 Wal-Mart stores. That would bring the

average number of "serious" incidents per store to 8.

16 As of March 7, 2006, we had not received sufficient information to clarify 19 incidents at Wal-Mart stores in

Houston reported as "Homicide Investigations." These incidents were being investigated by the Houston Homicide

Division, which investigates homicides but also other violent crimes. Information in response to two FOIA requests of

the incident reports was insufficient to determine what type of crime the police were investigating.

10

D. National Estimates of Reported Police Incidents at All Wal-Mart

Stores

At the end of 2004, Wal-Mart had a total of 3,702 stores in the United States. Based on this study's finding

of an average of 269 calls for service per Wal-Mart store, we estimate that as many as 995,838 police

incidents may have been reported at U.S. Wal-Mart stores nationwide in 2004. Using this same 2004

estimate, police were called an average of 2,728 times every day, 114 times every hour, and two times

every minute, to Wal-Mart stores in the United States (See Table 6).

Table 6: Nationwide Estimates of Reported Police Incidents at Wal-Mart Stores in 2004

2004

Average

Rate of

Reported

Incidents

Per Wal-

Mart

Store

# of Wal-Mart

Stores, 2004

Nationwide Estimate

of Reported Police

Incidents at Wal-

Mart Stores

Reported

Incidents per

Day

Reported

Incidents

Per Hour

Reported

Incidents

Per Minute

269

3,702 995,838 2,728 114 2

E. Reported Police Incidents: A Comparison of Wal-Mart & Target

Stores

A critical question explored by the "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" study is whether Wal-Mart stores are unique in

experiencing a significant average rate of reported police incidents or do other nearby "big box stores"

experience similar rates of reported police incidents. In theory, both Wal-Mart and nearby Target stores

should be expected to experience roughly similar rates of reported police incidents. In order to address this

question, a second phase of the "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" safe study compared and contrasted the rates of police

incidents reported between select Wal-Mart stores and nearby Target stores.

This phase of the study focused on the 50 Wal-Mart stores out of the 460 analyzed stores that experienced

the "highest rate" of reported police incidents in 2004.17 Target stores chosen for the comparative analysis

were within a 10-mile radius of the 50 "high incident" Wal-Mart stores. Of these 50 "high incident" Wal-

Mart stores, three stores did not have a Target within 10 miles, leaving a sample of 47 Wal-Mart stores for

further analysis. Because of further data restrictions, the sample for comparison was limited to 32 Wal-Mart

stores and 30 nearby Target stores.18

17 Methodological constraints prevented us from being able to request and analyze police reports for every Target store

within 10 miles of the 551 Wal-Mart stores for which we received police reports. We chose instead the 50 Wal-Mart

stores from the 551 in this study that had the highest total number of police incidents reported. For each of these 50

Wal-Mart stores, Yahoo Yellow Pages and Driving Directions were used to locate the nearest Target store within 10

miles of the Wal-Mart store.

18 As of February 13, 2006, we received incident reports for 37 Target stores. Of these 37 incident reports, seven of

them could not be used for our analysis because (i) three of the Target stores were not open for all of 2004, (ii) two

Target stores had police reports for 2005 but not for 2004, (iii) one police department only reported 911 emergency

calls and not other incidents for the Target store for which we requested information, and (iv) one police department

only sent information on arrests instead of information on all incidents. Therefore, in the end we analyzed incident

reports for 32 Wal-Mart stores and 30 Target stores.

11

Based on a detailed analysis of official reports, a total of 24,645 police incidents were reported at the 32

"high incident" Wal-Mart stores in 2004. The average number of police incidents reported for these Wal-

Mart stores was 770 per store in 2004. Interestingly, when comparing official data for Wal-Mart and Target

stores, a significant difference did exist between the average rate of reported police incidents at Wal-Mart

stores versus the average rate of reported police incidents at nearby Target stores.19

With respect to Target, a total of 5,100 police incidents were reported at the 30 Target stores located within

10 miles of the 32 "high incident" Wal-Mart stores in 2004. Based on the data, the average number of

police incidents reported among nearby Target stores was 170 in 2004. In comparison, the average rate for

the Wal-Mart stores was 770 in 2004. In addition, two of the 30 Target stores (Coral Springs, FL and

Albuquerque, NM) were each within 10 miles of two Wal-Mart stores. In order to equalize the sample at

32 Wal-Mart stores and 32 Target stores, we recalculated the total by counting the reported police incidents

from these two Target stores twice. Counting these two Target stores twice raises the total number of

reported police incidents for Target to 5,590 and increases the police incident average to 175 per Target

Store versus 770 per Wal-Mart store.

Table 7: Averages for Wal-Mart Stores and Target Stores Analyzed

Average Number of Reported

Police Incidents at the 32 Wal-

Mart Stores in 2004:

Average Number of

Reported Police Incidents at

the 30 Target Stores in 2004:

Average Number of

Reported Police Incidents

at the 32 Target Police

Reports (30 stores with 2

counted twice) in 2004:

770 170 175

Based on the total number of reported police incidents for Wal-Mart (24,645) and Target (5,590), the daily

rate of calls for service also varies considerably between these two retailers. Target stores experience a

reported police incident rate of 0.47 a day or less than one call for service every two days. In contrast, Wal-

Mart stores experience a reported police incident rate of 2.10 a day or over four calls for service every two

days. Essentially, the average rate of reported police incidents at Wal-Mart stores is over 400 percent

higher than the average rate of incidents at nearby Target stores.

Interestingly, Wal-Mart stores continued to experience higher rates of reported police incidents per store

even when each Wal-Mart store in the sample is compared individually to the nearest Target. In fact, in

every case, the total number of reported police incidents at the Wal-Mart store analyzed exceeded the total

number of calls for service at its closest Target store. The largest difference between any of these Wal-Mart

and Target stores was in Dallas, Texas, where a Wal-Mart store had 987 more reported incidents than the

nearest Target store (4 miles away). The smallest difference was in Ocoee, Florida where a Wal-Mart store

had 194 more calls for service than the nearest Target store (3 miles away) (See Table 8).

19 The police reports and other data available to us at present do not fully explain why these Wal-Mart stores have a

higher average rate of incidents than the nearby Target stores. This study does not attempt to analyze the factors that

might account for the difference in these rates.

12

Table 8: Store-by-Store Comparison of Wal-Mart and Target Stores reported police incidents in

2004

Wal-Mart Store

City, St

Wal-Mart Store

Address

Wal-Mart

Reported

Incidents by

Store in 2004

Target Store

City, St Target Store Address

Target

Reported

Incidents

by Store

in 2004

Distance

Between

Wal-Mart

and

Target

Store (in

Miles)

Differe

nce

Betwee

n # of

WMT

Inciden

ts and #

of TGT

Inciden

ts in

2004

Dallas, TX 7401 Samuell Blvd 1,173 Mesquite, TX

1629 N Town East

Blvd 186 4 987

Houston, TX 2727 Dunvale Road 1,123 Houston, TX 7051 Southwest Fwy 197 2 926

Merritt Island, FL

1500 E Merritt Island

Cswy 984

Merritt Island,

FL 250 Crockett Blvd 170 3 814

Albuquerque, NM

2550 Coors Bldv.

Nw 975

Albuquerque,

NM 9371 Coors Blvd NW 169 5.5 806

Houston, TX

2700 South

Kirkwood Drive 941 Houston, TX

10801 Westheimer

Rd 95 1.3 846

Bakersfield, CA 2300 White Lane 922 Bakersfield, CA 1300 Wible Rd 151 1.7 771

N Richland Hills,

TX 6401 Ne Loop 820 915 Watauga, TX 8000 Denton Hwy 54 3.2 861

Coral Springs, FL 3801 Turtle Creek Dr 862

Coral Springs,

FL* 6200 W Sample Rd 242 0.2 620

Dekalb, IL 2300 Sycamore Road 844 De Kalb, IL 2555 Sycamore Rd 108 0.4 736

Mesa, AZ

1955 So. Stapley

Drive 828 Mesa, AZ 1135 S Gilbert Rd 165 1.5 663

Bakersfield, CA 2601 Fashion Place 805 Bakersfield, CA 3401 Mall View Rd 103 0.3 702

Coral Springs, FL 6001 Coral Ridge 796

Coral Springs,

FL* 6200 W Sample Rd 242 4.9 554

Hickory, NC 2525 Hwy 70 Se 785 Hickory, NC

1910 Catawba Valley

Blvd SE 275 3.6 510

Dallas, TX

1521 North Cockrell

Hill Road 782 Dallas, TX 2417 N Haskell Ave 500 6.8 282

Arlington, TX

4801 South Cooper

Street 779 Arlington, TX

1600 W Arbrook

Blvd 248 1 531

Garland, TX

3159 Garland

Avenue 761 Garland, TX 5301 N Garland Ave 149 1.1 612

Houston, TX

13484 Northwest

Freeway 753 Houston, TX

13250 Northwest

Fwy 148 0.4 605

Victorville, CA

15272 Bear Valley

Road 731 Victorville, CA 15321 Palmdale Rd 56 2.4 675

Yuma, AZ 2900 S Pacific Ave 722 Yuma, AZ 725 W 32nd St 131 1.7 591

Albuquerque, NM 400 Eubank Blvd NE 708

Albuquerque,

NM*

11120 Lomas Blvd

NE 248 0.6 460

Hamden, CT

2300 Dixwell

Avenue 685

North Haven,

CT 200 Universal Dr N 105 2.6 580

13

Wal-Mart Store

City, St

Wal-Mart Store

Address

Wal-Mart

Reported

Incidents by

Store in 2004

Target Store

City, St Target Store Address

Target

Reported

Incidents

by Store

in 2004

Distance

Between

Wal-Mart

and

Target

Store (in

Miles)

Differe

nce

Betwee

n # of

WMT

Inciden

ts and #

of TGT

Inciden

ts in

2004

Greenville, NC 210 Greenville Blvd 664 Greenville, NC 3040 S Evans St 159 0.1 505

National City, CA

1200 Highland

Avenue 641

Chula Vista,

CA 40 N 4th Ave 229 1.6 412

Phoenix, AZ

3721 East Thomas

Road 632 Phoenix, AZ 4515 E Thomas Rd 209 0.9 423

Amarillo, TX 3700 I-40 East 618 Amarillo, TX 8201 W Interstate 40 51 7.7 567

Wichita, KS 501 East Pawnee 607 Wichita, KS 404 S Tracy St 100 3.8 507

Beaumont, TX

4145 North Dowlen

Road 606 Beaumont, TX 5850 Eastex Fwy 58 0.7 548

Ocoee, FL

10500 West Colonial

Drive 606 Orlando, FL

7501 West Colonial

Drive 412 3 194

Phoenix, AZ

6145 North 35Th

Avenue 603 Phoenix, AZ

740 W Camelback

Rd 197 3.1 406

Brandon, FL

11110 Causeway

Blvd 601 Brandon, FL

187 Brandon Town

Center Dr 81 1 520

Albuquerque, NM

301 San Mateo Blvd

Se 598

Albuquerque,

NM*

11120 Lomas Blvd

NE 248 3.4 350

Independence,

MO

4000 South Bolger

Dr 595

Independence,

MO 17810 E 39th St S 104 0.2 491

Total Wal-Mart Store

Reported Incidents in

2004: 24,645

Total Target Store

Reported Incidents in

2004: 5,590

Difference

in

Reported

Incidents 19,055

*Note: Date gathered for Target stores in Coral Springs, FL and Albuquerque, NM are counted twice because they are each within ten

miles of more than one Wal-Mart store.

14

F. Wal-Mart versus Target Stores: Average Rate of Reported Violent &

Serious Crime Incidents

We also analyzed whether any difference existed between Wal-Mart and Target in the number of reported

police incidents defined as "serious or violent crimes." (See definitions set forth in Section C.) Again,

based on the sample of 32 high incident Wal-Mart stores and 30 Target stores, with the data for two Target

stores counted twice, a striking difference existed between the rates of "serious or violent crime" incidents

at Wal-Mart stores versus nearby Target stores.

In total, 648 "serious or violent" incidents were reported at the Wal-Mart stores versus 100 at nearby Target

stores. On average, 20.25 "serious or violent" criminal incidents were reported per Wal-Mart store versus

3.13 per Target store. Based on this analysis, Wal-Mart stores experienced 6 times the number of reported

criminal incidents defined as "serious or violent" than nearby Target stores in 2004.20

Table 9: Comparison of Reported "Serious or Violent" Incidents at Wal-Mart versus Target in 2004

Reported Incident Category Number of Reported

Incidents by Category

at 32 Wal-Mart Stores

Number of Reported

Incidents by Category at

30 Target Stores

(with Coral Springs and

Albuquerque stores

counted twice)

Assault with a deadly weapon, assault, and

battery:

198 33

Auto theft: 303 34

Robbery and attempted robbery: 109 18

Sex crimes: 31 14

Kidnapping and attempted kidnapping: 3 0

Rape and attempted rape: 2 1

Homicide and attempted homicide: 221 0

TOTAL 648 100

20 Some municipalities include more crimes under the heading of "serious" crime than does the FBI. They include, for

example, weapons law violations and drug/narcotic violations. We also analyzed the data from 32 Wal-Mart stores and

30 Target stores for these two categories. Police reported 144 incidents involving drug/narcotics violations at the 32

Wal-Mart stores. Police reported 26 incidents involving drug/narcotics violations at the 30 Target stores (with data for

2 of those stores counted twice). Police reported 32 incidents involving weapons law violations at the 32 Wal-Mart

stores. Police reported 8 incidents involving weapons law violations at the 30 Target stores (with data for 2 of those

stores counted twice).

Putting these two categories into the totals would boost to 824 the number of "serious" incidents reported at the 32

Wal-Mart stores and boost to 134 the number of "serious" incidents reported at the 30 Target stores (with 2 repeated).

See the following website for a description of all the categories considered "serious" under one state's crime reporting:

www.bci.utah.gov/UCRIBR/PartOne_GroupA.pdf

Adding police incidents involving drug/narcotics violations and weapons law violations would boost the average

number of such incidents per store. On average, 25.75 "serious" criminal incidents were reported per Wal-Mart store

versus 4.18 per Target store. Even with this broader categorization of "serious" crimes, Wal-Mart stores continue to

experience 6 times the number of reported criminal incidents defined as "serious or violent" than nearby Target stores

in 2004.

21 This figure does not include 8 incidents which are characterized as "Homicide Investigations" by the Houston

Homicide Department, which investigates many serious crimes involving weapons and assaults. As of March 7, 2006,

information received from the Houston Homicide Department based on two separate FOIA requests for incident reports

failed to provide sufficient details to determine if these were investigations of homicides or calls about weapons. None

of the three Targets in Houston had "Homicide Investigations."

15

G. Policing Wal-Mart Stores: Estimating the Cost to Taxpayers

Various police officials, as cited in section A of this report, have discussed the negative effects that high

rates of reported police incidents at Wal-Mart stores have on local policing efforts. Each police incident at a

Wal-Mart store is not only costly in terms of taxing local police response and adding additional

administrative duties, but is a direct expense paid by local taxpayers. This section of the "Is Wal-Mart

Safe?" study estimates the cost to taxpayers for policing Wal-Mart stores.22

According to public and government reports, for each incident, a police officer will spend an average of

one hour responding to each call for service, which includes interviewing witnesses, apprehending

suspects, and/or assisting citizens, and another one hour on related administrative duties, such as writing

reports.23 Nationally, the average police department spends $80,600 in operating costs per police officer

each year – resulting in a $38.75 average hourly rate for police officers. 24 At this hourly rate, we estimate

the average cost of a police response is $77.50 per incident. By multiplying this average hourly police cost

per incident by the total number of incidents at Wal-Mart stores, it is possible to estimate the total taxpayer

cost of police responding to Wal-Mart incidents.

Essentially, given the average of two hours of police time spent per police incident, the taxpayer cost per

incident at Wal-Mart store is estimated at $77.50. Since 148,331 police incidents were reported at 551

Wal-Mart stores, the estimated total cost to taxpayers for these 551 stores was $11,495,653 in 2004. The

average cost to taxpayers per Wal-Mart store, based on the sample of 551 stores analyzed, was $20,848 per

store in 2004.

Extrapolating these figures on a nationwide basis, and based on an average of 269 incidents per Wal-Mart

store and a total number of 3,702 Wal-Mart stores at the end of 2004, taxpayers would have paid an

estimated $77,177,445 to respond to 995,838 reported police incidents at Wal-Mart stores (See Table

10).25

22 Estimating the taxpayer cost of responding to reported police incidents at Wal-Mart stores depends on three factors:

(a) the average time spent by police officials per call; (b) the average time spent by police officials conducting

administrative duties related to the call, such as filling out reports; (c) the average hourly expense per police officer.

For the purposes of estimation, we assume that the police respond to every call for service.

23 We based our hours per call estimate on data gleaned from several news articles and official testimony. See "FY

2003 APPROPRIATIONS, Federal Document Clearing House Congressional Testimony," April 10, 2002, "Better

Coordination Needed Among Participating Agencies," GAO Reports, March 30, 2001, "No slowdown in fighting

speeders," The Union Leader (Manchester NH) August 23, 2005, "St. Petersburg Police Department uses new

recruitment video to weed out cadets," CBS News Transcripts June 13, 2005, "DUI Crash Shatters The Lives Of 2

Lawmen," The Arizona Republic (Phoenix) December 20, 2004, "FP Detectives Overworked, Report Finds," The

Stuart News/Port St. Lucie News (Stuart, FL) October 31, 1998, "A Shock to the System," Denver Westword

(Colorado) June 11, 1998, "DA stops prosecuting some misdemeanors," Albuquerque Tribune (New Mexico) January

07, 1998, "City considers mandatory permits for burglar alarms," Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Texas) December 16,

1998, "Annapolis police want pay raise, but that's not all," The Capital (Annapolis, MD.) April 23, 1998, "Booking:

Change helping officers," Ventura County Star (California) December 14, 1997

24 The U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics reported in 2000 that the average police department

spent $80,600 per officer. The amount spent per police officer includes operating costs such as salary, benefits,

equipment costs, and other operating expenses. The hourly cost for policing is based on dividing the average yearly

cost of an officer by a 40-hour week spread over 52 weeks.

25 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., SEC Filing, Form 10-K, Fiscal Year 2005

16

Table 10: Estimating Cost to Taxpayers of Policing U.S. Wal-Mart Stores, 2004

2004

Average

Incident

Rate

Per

Wal-

Mart

store

# of Wal-Mart

Stores, 2004

Nationwide Estimate of

Reported Police

Incidents at Wal-Mart

Estimated Cost per

Reported Incident

Estimated Nationwide Cost

to Taxpayers

Average Cost of

Reported Incidents Per

Wal-Mart Store

269

3,702 995,838 $77.50 $77,177,445 $20,848

H. Policing Wal-Mart versus Target Stores: Estimates of Taxpayer Cost

Based on 24,645 calls for service at 32 "high incident" Wal-Mart stores, we estimate that taxpayers paid

$1,909,988 to police these 32 Wal-Mart stores in 2004. The average cost to taxpayers was $59,675 per

"high incident" Wal-Mart store.

In contrast, we estimate that taxpayers paid $433,225 to police Target stores in 2004, based on a total of

5,590 calls for service.26 The estimated average taxpayer cost per Target stores is $13,563. This

comparative sample of "high incident" Wal-Mart stores and nearby Target stores suggests that policing

efforts at Wal-Mart stores cost taxpayers nearly 4.4 times more per store than nearby Target stores.

I. Policing Wal-Mart Stores: Estimated Taxpayer Costs, 2006-2010

In 2006, Wal-Mart announced plans to open 1,500 new U.S. Wal-Mart stores over the next five years.27

Based on a growth rate of 300 new stores per year, and assuming the average number of 269 reported

police incidents per Wal-Mart store remains constant, we project the cost to taxpayers will rise substantially

over the next five years consistent with Wal-Mart's growth.

Extrapolating our cost estimates on a national basis, we further estimate that local police departments will

respond to 6,398,165 police incidents at Wal-Mart stores over the next five years. We estimate that in 2010

police will respond to 1,441,033 calls for service at over 5,357 U.S. Wal-Mart stores. Thus, we estimate the

total cost to local taxpayers for policing U.S. Wal-Mart stores over the next five years (2006-2010) will be

$495,857,788 – or nearly half a billion dollars. (See Table 11 and Appendix A)28

26 Since two Target stores (Coral Springs, FL and Albuquerque, NM) are located within 10 miles of more than one of

the 32 Wal-Mart stores, the police incident data from these specific Target stores were counted twice to equalize the

sample at 32 Wal-Mart stores and 32 Target stores

27 "Wal-Mart sees room for over 1,500 new stores," www.msnbc.com, 02/08/06

28 This figure assumes that operating costs per police officer holds constant at $80,600 a year. This figure is from the

Bureau of Justice Statistics for 2000 and is likely to yield a conservative estimate for the costs in 2010. We use that

figure because it is the latest available figure.

17

Table 11: Estimating Cost to Taxpayers, 2006-2010

Year

ending

Projected

# of Wal-

Mart

stores

Estimated

Number of Police

Incidents (All U.S.

Wal-Mart Stores)

Projected Taxpayer

Cost29

31-Dec-06 4,157 1,118,233 $86,663,058

31-Dec-07 4,457 1,198,933 $92,917,308

31-Dec-08 4,757 1,279,633 $99,171,558

31-Dec-09 5,057 1,360,333 $105,425,808

31-Dec-10 5,357 1,441,033 $111,680,058

Total 5 year cost $495,857,788

J. Improving Security at Wal-Mart Stores: Wal-Mart's Cost

In 1996, Dave Gorman, then vice president of Loss Prevention for Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., publicly

acknowledged that a 1994 test project of "roving security patrols" effectively reduced incidents of crime at

high crime Wal-Mart stores to near zero.30 According to Mr. Gorman, a 1994 internal Wal-Mart survey

determined that 80 percent of Wal-Mart crime occurred in store parking lots. Since 1996, Wal-Mart has yet

to publicly adopt a national Wal-Mart crime deterrent policy that would include security measures, such as

manned security cameras and roving security patrols at all stores.

The most recent public statements by Wal-Mart in 2000 state that only 17 percent of its stores have roving

security patrols.31 Given the large number and type of police incidents that were reported at just a sample

of Wal-Mart stores in 2004, it would appear that Wal-Mart could, as it determined in its own study in 1994,

significantly reduce police incidents, as well as deter future incidents, through more active security

measures at each store. More importantly, since Wal-Mart estimates that 151 million consumers - 70

percent of them women - shop at Wal-Mart stores each week, and given that its own internal reviews in

1996 show that crime is a factor in store performance, it is fair to state that improvements to Wal-Mart

security would provide a safer shopping experience for consumers while also helping minimize taxpayer

costs.

This part of the "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" study estimates the total cost to Wal-Mart if it adopted a companywide

program of 24-hour roving "security patrols" for all its stores.

The basis for calculating Wal-Mart's cost of providing "roving security patrols" at all stores in 2005 is as

follows:

?? Average price for a golf cart in the United States was $4,000 in 2005.32

?? Average hourly wage of a security guard in the U.S. is $9.87.33

29 This figure assumes that operating costs per police officer holds constant at $80,600 a year. This figure is from the

Bureau of Justice Statistics for 2000

30 David Gorman, "Loss Prevention Racks Up Success," Security Management, March, 1996

31 Good Morning America, August 11, 2000

32 Average of figures in news articles and prices from one dealer. See Golf Carts Buyer's Guide, "Utility vehicle and

golf car pricing," http://www.buyerzone.com/industrial/golf_carts/buyers_guide6.html, "Sun City future: Puttin'

along," The Charlotte Observer (North Carolina) January 29, 2006, "Little wheels, big jobs," Valley Morning Star,

October 22, 2005, "Golf cart business rolls into the green," St. Petersburg Times (Florida) June 23, 2003

33 Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Surveys (BLS), Occupational Employment Survey, November 2004,

www.bls.gov/oes

18

?? Wal-Mart's wage cost for 24-hour security patrols per Wal-Mart store is $1,658 a week,

or $86,224 a year.

?? Total cost of "24-hour roving security patrol" is $90,224 a year per Wal-Mart store34

Based on these figures, it is estimated that providing a 24-hour "roving security patrol" at all 3,857 Wal-

Mart stores in 2005 would cost Wal-Mart $348 million or one-tenth of one percent of its total revenue.35

The estimated cost of security patrols running dusk-to-dawn would be just $181 million in 2005.

Based on Wal-Mart's stated customer base of 151 million consumers a week, it is estimated that 24-hour

security patrols would cost Wal-Mart an average of 4 cents per weekly visit by a customer. In contrast,

"Dusk-to-Dawn" security patrols could be provided at all Wal-Mart stores at the cost of 2 cents per weekly

visit by a customer.

Table 12: Estimating Cost of Security Patrols Per Weekly Customer

Total yearly cost for all U.S. stores $347,995,202

Cost per week $6,692,215

Number of Customers per week 151,158,049

Cost per customer $0.04

34 This figure is calculated by including the price of a new golf cart and paying a security guard to operate it 24 hours a

day in the parking lot of a Wal-Mart store.

35 Wal-Mart Stores Inc., just released its net sales figures for the year ending January 31, 2006. It posted $312.4 billion

in revenue. The cost of providing round the clock roving security guard patrols in every one of its U.S. parking lots

would be 0.11 percent of this sales figure. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., SEC Filing, Form 10-K, Fiscal Year 2006

19

Conclusion

The "Is Wal-Mart Safe?" report is the first-ever national survey examining reports of police incidents at

Wal-Mart stores and parking lots. The report shows, based on the stores sampled, Wal-Mart has a

significant number of police incidents, and Wal-Mart has a higher average rate of police incidents than one

of its closest competitors, Target.

This study finds some disturbing facts about Wal-Mart and crime in 2004, including:

1) In 2004, Wal-Mart had a total of 2,909 calls for service for alleged "serious or violent crimes" at just 460

of its stores. For this sample, the most "serious or violent crimes" that police reported responding to,

included: 4 homicides, 9 rapes or attempted rapes, 23 kidnappings or attempted kidnappings, 154 sex

crimes, 1,024 auto thefts, and 550 robberies or attempted robberies. Based on the total number of "serious

or violent criminal incidents" reported, an average of six "serious or violent incidents" were reported per

Wal-Mart store in 2004 (see Section C).

2) The Wal-Mart stores sampled had an average reported police incident rate of 269 incidents per store in

2004 (see Section B).

3) Based on the number of incidents in the sample, we estimate that for all Wal-Mart stores nationwide,

police may have responded to 995,838 police incidents at Wal-Mart stores in 2004, two incidents per

minute (see Section D).

4) Wal-Mart stores had more calls for service than nearby Target stores. For the sample, the average rate of

reported police incidents at Wal-Mart stores was 400% higher than the average rate of incidents at nearby

Target stores and 6 times higher for the number of reported criminal incidents defined as "serious or

violent" (see Section E & F).

5) Based on the number of incidents in the sample, we estimate that in 2004 the nationwide cost to

American taxpayers for police to respond to 995,838 calls for service at Wal-Mart stores or parking lots

was $77 million (see Section G).

6) Over the next five years (2006-2011), it is estimated police will have to respond to 6,398,165 police

incidents at Wal-Mart stores at a cost of nearly half a billion dollars, $495, 857,788 (see Section I).

7) The cost to Wal-Mart to provide a 24-hour "roving security patrol," which internal Wal-Mart studies say

can lower crime to near zero levels, would only be $348 million or one-tenth of one percent of its total

revenue. The $348 million figure means Wal-Mart could institute security measures for only 4 cents per

weekly customer visit (see Section J).

In conclusion, it is evident the problem of Wal-Mart and crime has not gone away since Wal-Mart's own

internal study in 1994. In fact, as early as 1995, Wal-Mart officials warned the company about a high

number of police incidents at some of its stores and developed an effective solution for deterring or

lowering crime. Yet, it appears that Wal-Mart officials chose not to adopt a national program to address

the problem of crime at its stores and only implemented the "roving security patrol" solution at 17 percent

of its stores.

20

Appendix A: Methodology for the Study: "Is Wal-Mart Safe?"

The following provides a detailed explanation of the study's methodology.

An Analysis of Incident Reports at Wal-Mart Stores

• In 2005, we requested from certain police departments lists of all incidents reported (calls for

service) at Wal-Mart stores over the last two years, organized by date, and the type of incident that

police responded to. The departments were chosen randomly among a sample of 1,004 Wal-Mart

stores. These 1,004 stores were selected based on concentrations of Wal-Mart stores and

geographic diversity. We received documents back from police departments covering 582 stores

in 483 cities in 30 states. The documents that we received are available online at

WalMartCrimeReport.com.

• In order to have a standardized and comparable time period for the study, we limited our analysis

to those Wal-Mart stores that were open for all of 2004. The considerable time needed to request,

organize, and analyze over 10,000 pages of data occurred during much of 2005. Future research

will be conducted to analyze all stores open as of 2005, as well as to compare 2004 and 2005

incident reports. In January 2004, Wal-Mart reported that it had 3,551 stores (3,013 Wal-Mart

stores and 538 Sam's Clubs) in the US.

• We received police reports for 582 Wal-Mart stores. Of these 582 stores, we were able to count

the total number of incidents reported for 551 Wal-Mart stores. We were unable to analyze the

other 31 reports because (i) we received them too late for this report, or (ii) the relevant stores

were not open for all of 2004.

o According to these police reports, in 2004, the police responded to 148,331 incidents at

these 551 Wal-Mart stores. This is an average of 269 calls for service per store in 2004.

Wal-Mart had 3,857 stores at the end of 2005. Based on the average calls for service per

store, we estimate that 1,037,533 incidents were reported to local police departments

from all U.S. Wal-Mart stores in 2005.

Estimating the Rates of Reported "Violent and Serious Crime" Police Incidents:

• We further analyzed the reports by categorizing the incidents by type of incident investigated. Of

the 551 reports, we were able to further analyze 460 Wal-Mart stores in 29 states. We were unable

to analyze the other 91 reports because (i) we received them too late for this report, (ii) the law

enforcement department did not provide the information necessary to categorize the incidents, or

(iii) the departments only provided the sum total of incidents. A list of these store locations is

attached to this report. For these 460 Wal-Mart stores, in 2004, police departments responded to a

total number of 122,751 incidents.

• We used the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) codes in order to categorize the reports of

"serious and violent crimes" at Wal-Mart stores. Police departments may list standard UCR

crimes under slightly different names on the reports that we received. The following is how we

categorized "Serious or Violent Crimes."

o Assault with a deadly weapon, assault, and battery: Includes any incident that contained

the words "assault" or "battery." Does not include incidents indicating domestic

violence, threats, or harassment.

o Auto theft: Includes auto theft. Does not include incidents indicating theft of items from

an auto, recovery of stolen autos, or shoplifting.

21

o Drug "related": Includes incidents such as drug or controlled substance possession,

distribution, or possession of drug paraphernalia. Does not include incidents indicating

prescription forgery or intoxication.

o Robbery and Attempted Robbery: Includes any incident mentioning robbery, armed

robbery, or attempted robbery

o Sex Crimes: Includes incidents such as molestation, lewd behavior, lascivious behavior,

and prostitution. Does not include rape incidents.

o Kidnapping and Attempted Kidnapping: Includes any incident indicating kidnapping or

abductions.

o Rape and Attempted Rape: Includes any incident that contained the word rape.

o Homicide and Attempted Homicide: Includes any incident indicating homicide or

attempted homicide.

• We also categorized the following incidents:

o Drug "related": Includes incidents such as drug or controlled substance possession,

distribution, or possession of drug paraphernalia. Does not include incidents

indicating prescription forgery or intoxication.

o Weapons: Includes incidents such as brandishing or possessing a weapon.

Comparing Wal-Mart Stores to Nearby Target Stores:

• Methodological constraints prevented us from being able to request and analyze police reports for

every Target store within 10 miles of the 551 Wal-Mart stores for which we received police

reports. We chose instead the 50 Wal-Mart stores from the 551 which had the highest total

number of police incidents reported. For each of these 50 Wal-Mart stores, Yahoo Yellow Pages

and Driving Directions were used to locate the nearest Target store within 10 miles of the Wal-

Mart store.

• As of February 13, 2006, we received incident reports for 37 Target stores. Of these 37 incident

reports, 7 of them could not be used for our analysis because (i) 3 of the Target stores were not

open for all of 2004, (ii) 2 Target stores had police reports for 2005 but not for 2004, (iii) 1 police

department only reported 911 emergency calls and not other incidents for the Target store for

which we requested information, and (iv) 1 police department only sent information on arrests

instead of information on all incidents. Therefore in the end we analyzed incident reports for 32

Wal-Mart stores and 30 Target stores, with incident reports for two Target stores counted twice to

equalize the Wal-Mart and Target sample.

Estimating the Taxpayer Cost of Policing Wal-Mart Stores:

• In order to estimate the taxpayer cost of policing Wal-Mart stores we estimated the average cost of

policing an incident per hour and the average amount of time spent per incident at Wal-Mart.

• We used the Bureau of Justice Statistics figure for the average local police department's operating

costs per police officer from 2000. This figure for 2000 was the most recent available figure.

(Note that the BJS reported higher operating costs per officer for sheriff's departments and other

police forces.) Operating costs include such things as salaries, benefits, and equipment. From this

figure, we were able to estimate what the average local police department spends on police work

per hour per police officer by dividing it by 40 hours a week for 52 weeks. Because our figure is

from 2000 and policing costs have likely risen we believe that our estimate is conservative.

• Based on newspaper accounts and official testimony from police officials, we estimated that for

the average incident, officers spend one hour in the field and one hour on other related duties. An

officer likely has to spend much more time on a call if an arrest is made, if an officer later has to

testify in court, or if the officer has to collect detailed evidence. An officer may spend less time

22

per incident on police incidents where citizens and businesses do not press charges or where other

citizens provide most of the aid to the citizen or company making the call for police service.

• Therefore, our figure for policing Wal-Mart stores assumes that one police officer responds to

each incident and spends two hours responding to the incident.

Projecting Total Taxpayer Cost to Police Wal-Marts from 2006-2011

• We took Wal-Mart's statement that it will open 1,500 stores between 2006 and 2011 and projected

that the company would open up 300 stores each year between 2006 and 2011.

• Based on our finding in this study that the average Wal-Mart store of the 551 stores we analyzed

had 269 calls for service in 2004, we applied this average to the projected number of stores open

for 2006 through 2011. We similarly multiplied the figure for the average cost of responding to a

police incident with the projected number of police incidents at all U.S. Wal-Mart stores from

2006 to 2011.

• We continued to hold constant the operating costs per officer from 2000. We believe that police

costs have increased from 2000 to present and will continue to increase through 2011. Therefore,

we believe that our estimate for police costs is conservative.

Estimating the Cost of Security Patrols at Wal-Mart

• In order to estimate the cost of roving security patrols at Wal-Mart, we determined the average

cost of a new golf cart and the average hourly wage of a security guard. The average price for a

golf cart, which was $4,000, was determined by news articles and prices reported from an online

golf cart dealer. The average hourly wage of a security guard was determined using Bureau of

Labor Statistics (BLS) government industry data, which was $9.87. To calculate the annual cost

of round the clock security for one store, we multiplied this hourly wage rate by 24 hours and 365

days a year. We then added in the cost of the golf cart. Therefore, the estimated annual cost of

providing roving 24-hour security to one store is $90,224.

• To determine a company-wide cost of security we multiplied this out by the total Wal-Mart stores

in 2005. This estimated cost is $348 million a year. The weekly cost is determined by dividing

this figure by 52 which equals $6.7 million a week.

• Wal-Mart states that it has 151 million customers a week. Therefore to determine the estimated

cost of round-the-clock security per weekly store visit, we divide $6.7 million by 151 million

customers to come up with 4 cents per weekly store visit.

23

Appendix B: Summary of Reports of Alleged Crimes at Wal-Marts

Between 2003 and 2006

Murderi

The press reported 16 alleged murders between 2003 and 2006 in Wal-Mart parking lots and stores. In

addition, according to press reports, two women were allegedly abducted from Wal-Mart parking lots

between 2003 and 2006 and killed elsewhere.

Reported Alleged Murders at Wal-Mart Stores and Parking Lots

Glendale, AZ August 2005

The Associated Press, August 25,

2005ii

Glendale, AZ August 2005

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer,

August 24, 2005iii

Riverside, CA April 2004

Press Enterprise (Riverside, CA),

April 16, 2004iv

Colorado Springs, CO June 2005

The Gazette (Colorado Springs),

September 14, 2005v

Rocky Hill, CT February 2004

Hartford Courant (Connecticut),

February 25, 2004vi

Macon, GA February 2006

Macon Telegraph (Georgia),

February 9, 2006vii

Baton Rouge, LA May 2004

The Reveille via University Wire,

June 25, 2004viii

Las Vegas, NV June 2004

Las Vegas Review-Journal

(Nevada), October 20, 2004ix

Las Vegas, NV December 2004

Las Vegas Review-Journal

(Nevada), 12/18/2004x

East Stroudsburg, PA December 2004

Morning Call (Allentown,

Pennsylvania), December 18,

2004xi

Garden City, SC June 2005

The Myrtle Beach Sun-News,

June 5, 2005xii

Grand Prairie, TX June 2004

Associated Press, June 20,

2004xiii

Katy, TX June 2005

Houston Chronicle, June 16,

2005xiv

Spring, TX February 2006

KTRK Channel 13 Houston, TX,

February 5, 2006xv

Fairlawn, VA February 2006

The Roanoke Times, February

26, 2006xvi

Spokane, WA June 2005

Spokeman Review (Spokane

WA), June 14, 2005xvii

Reported Alleged Abductions from Wal-Mart Parking Lots Where Victims Were Murdered

Elsewhere

West Memphis, AR April 2003

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette,

April 12, 2003xviii

Tyler, TX January 2005

NBC News Transcripts January

22, 2005xix

24

Attempted Murders

The press reported 19 alleged attempted murders between 2003 and 2006 in Wal-Mart parking lots and

stores.

Reported Alleged Attempted Murders at Wal-Mart Stores and Parking

Lots

Monterey

County, CA July 2003 Monterey County Herald, July 31, 2003xx

Ukiah, CA March 2003 UPI, November 16, 2004xxi

Colorado

Springs, CO May 2005 The Gazette (Colorado Springs), May. 23, 2005xxii

Greeley, CO November 2005 Durango Herald (Colorado), November 10, 2005xxiii

Palm Beach

County, FL May 2003 Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, FL) May 21, 2003xxiv

Fort Myers, FL June 2005 The News-Press (Fort Myers, Florida), June 29, 2005xxv

Manatee

County, FL January 2003 The Bradenton Herald (Florida), January 22, 2003xxvi

Fort

Oglethorpe, GA December 2005 WDEF-TV Channel 12, Chattanooga TN, Dec 27, 2005xxvii

Galesburg, IL December 2004 The Pantagraph (Bloomington, Illinois), January 3, 2005xxviii

Cumberland, IN September 2004 The Indianapolis Star, September 23, 2004xxix

Boutte, LA March 2003 Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), March 18, 2003xxx

Albuquerque,

NM August 2005 KASA, Channel 2 News, Albuquerque, August 25, 2005xxxi

Glenville, NY September 2003 The Times Union (Albany, NY), September 10, 2003xxxii

Oneonta, NY April 2003 Press & Sun-Bulletin (Binghamton, NY), April 1, 2003xxxiii

Surfside Beach,

SC June 2005 The Myrtle Beach Sun-News, June 3, 2005xxxiv

Sioux Falls, SD January 2005 Argus Leader (Sioux Falls, South Dakota), July 13, 2005xxxv

Memphis, TN November 2005 Daily Advertiser (Lafayette, LA), August 19, 2003xxxvi

Grand Prairie,

TX June 2004 Associated Press, June 20, 2004xxxvii

West Valley

City, UT January 2004 The Salt Lake Tribune, February 1, 2004xxxviii

Rape, Sexual Assault, and Molestation:

The press reported that 16 women and children were allegedly raped or sexually assaulted in Wal-Mart

stores and parking lots between 2003 and 2006. The press reported that 10 of these rapes and/or assaults

allegedly took place in the stores themselves. In addition, according to press reports, 4 women were

25

allegedly abducted from Wal-Mart parking lots and raped elsewhere between 2003 and 2006. Of these 20

reports, 11 involved alleged sexual assaults of children (9 of the alleged assaults on children allegedly took

place in the stores).

Alleged Rapes and Sexual Assaults Reported at Wal-Mart Stores and Parking Lots

Scottsdale, AZ 2004-2005 The Arizona Republic. Jul. 27, 2005xxxix

Scottsdale, AZ 2004-2005 The Arizona Republic. Jul. 27, 2005xl

Scottsdale, AZ June 2005 The Arizona Republic. Jul. 27, 2005xli

Greeley, CO

January

2006 Greeley Tribune (Colorado), January 28, 2006xlii

Greeley, CO

January

2006 Greeley Tribune (Colorado), January 28, 2006xliii

Avon, IN

February

2006 Indianapolis Star, February 8, 2006xliv

Lunenburg,

MA

January

2006 Sentinel & Enterprise (Fitchburg, MA), January 24, 2006xlv

Stafford, NJ July 2005 Asbury Park Press (New Jersey), July 29, 2005xlvi

East

Stroudsburg,

PA

February

2005 Morning Call (Allentown, Pennsylvania) March 9, 2005xlvii

Orangeburg,

SC July 2004 The Charlotte Observer (North Carolina), December 19, 2004xlviii

Aberdeen, SD August 2004 Aberdeen American News (South Dakota), August 30, 2004xlix

Hunter's

Crossing, TN

February

2004 Knoxville News-Sentinel (Tennessee), February 17, 2004l

Oak Ridge, TN July 2005 Knoxville News-Sentinel (Tennessee), July 6, 2005li

Houston, TX August 2005 The Houston Chronicle, August 06, 2005lii

Cedar City,

UT

January

2003 The Salt Lake Tribune, 2/24/2004liii

Grand Chute,

WI August 2003 The Post-Crescent (Appleton, WI), January 24, 2004liv

Reports of Women Allegedly Abducted from Wal-Mart Parking Lots and Raped Elsewhere

West

Melbourne,

FL February 2004 Florida Today (Brevard County, FL), February 9, 2004lv

Mountain

Home, ID June 2003 The Idaho Statesman, July 3, 2003lvi

Framingham,

MA December 2005 Boston Herald, December 21, 2005lvii

Tyler, TX January 2005 NBC News Transcripts, January 22, 2005lviii

26

Reported Alleged Sex Crimes Against Children at Wal-Mart Stores and Parking Lots

Scottsdale, AZ 2004- 2005 The Arizona Republic, Jul. 27, 2005lix

Scottsdale, AZ 2004- 2005 The Arizona Republic, Jul. 27, 2005lx

Scottsdale, AZ June 2005 The Arizona Republic, Jul. 27, 2005lxi

Avon, IN February 2006 Indianapolis Star, February 8, 2006lxii

Lunenburg,

MA January 2006 Sentinel & Enterprise (Fitchburg, MA), January 24, 2006lxiii

Stafford, NJ July 2005 Asbury Park Press (New Jersey), July 29, 2005lxiv

Orangeburg,

SC July 2004 The Charlotte Observer (North Carolina), December 19, 2004lxv

Aberdeen, SD August 2004 Aberdeen American News (South Dakota), August 30, 2004lxvi

Hunter's

Crossing, TN February 2004 Knoxville News-Sentinel (Tennessee), February 17, 2004lxvii

Houston, TX August 2005 The Houston Chronicle, August 06, 2005lxviii

Grand Chute,

WI August 2003 The Post-Crescent (Appleton, WI), January 24, 2004lxix

Attempted Rapes, Sexual Assaults:

The press reported that assailants allegedly tried to rape or sexually assault 3 women and children in Wal-

Mart parking lots and stores between 2003 and 2006.

Reported Alleged Attempted Rapes/Sexual Assaults at Wal-Mart Stores and Parking Lots

Ashland,

KY July 2003 The Associated Press, July 26, 2003lxx

Breaux

Bridge, LA June 2005 State-Times/Morning Advocate (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), May 24, 2003lxxi

Charlotte,

NC April 2003 Charlotte Observer (North Carolina), April 24, 2003lxxii

i The statistics above only include alleged crimes reported in Wal-Mart stores, their parking lots, or right

behind the stores. The statistics above excluded murders allegedly committed at Wal-Mart construction

sites, hit and run accidents in which the perpetrator was charged with homicide, Wal-Mart employees who

were alleged to have committed crimes off of store grounds, criminals who were apprehended at Wal-Mart

for crimes committed elsewhere, and crimes in which bodies or victims were found in Wal-Mart parking

lots but which the police suspect the crime was committed elsewhere.

27

ii Joy Hepp And Michelle Roberts, "Family, Friends Mourn Wal-Mart Workers Killed In Parking Lot," The

Associated Press, August 25, 2005

iii "Suspect Arrested After Fatal Wal-Mart Shootings," The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, August 24, 2005

iv John Welsh, "Search For Assailant Goes Through Busy Aisles; Man Killed Outside Store; Attack: Police

Seek The Assailant. The Incident Did Not Disrupt Shopping At A Riverside Wal-Mart." Press Enterprise

(Riverside, Ca) April 16, 2004

v Bill Hethcock, "Man Guilty Of Murder In Wal-Mart Shooting," The Gazette (Colorado Springs),

September 14, 2005

vi Katie Melone, "Dad Charged With Murder In Baby's Death," Hartford Courant (Connecticut), February

25, 2004

vii Liz Fabian, "Man shoots woman, then turns gun on himself at Zebulon Road Wal-Mart," Macon

Telegraph, 2/9/06

viii Natalie Naquin, "Businesses Receive Push To Increase Security," The Reveille Via University Wire,

June 25, 2004

ix "In Brief: Murder Charge Trial Ordered In Death Of Air Force Major," Las Vegas Review-Journal

(Nevada), October 20, 2004

x In Brief, Las Vegas Review-Journal (Nevada), 12/18/2004

xi "Tobyhanna man charged in shootings; East Stroudsburg incident left one dead and another injured,"

Morning Call (Allentown, Pennsylvania), December 18, 2004

xii "Man Charged With Murder In Woman's Death At Wal-Mart Parking Lot," The Associated Press, June

3, 2005 and "CASA boosts services to area Hispanics," The Myrtle Beach Sun-News, June 5, 2005

xiii "Officer shot by gunman in van upgraded to fair condition," Associated Press, June 20, 2004 and "GP

officer's killer had terminal cancer Relatives shocked Navy vet would take life of another public servant,"

The Dallas Morning News, June 20, 2004

xiv "Two robbery deaths cause stir in Katy: Police hold town hall meetings on crime issues," Houston

Chronicle, June 16, 2005

xv "Couple die in apparent murder-suicide in Spring," KTRK Channel 13 Houston, TX, February 5, 2006

xvi Tonia Moxley and Christina Rogers, "Man charged in killing at Wal-Mart," The Roanoke Times,

February 26, 2006 http://www.roanoke.com/news/roanoke/wb/wb/xp-54496

xvii Thomas Clouse And Rob McDonald, "Man Killed In Store Parking Lot; Suspected Killer, 6 Others

Arrested In Probe Of Shooting," Spokesman Review (Spokane, Wa), June 14, 2005

xviii Michael Frazier, "Parolee Caught On Camera With Kidnap Victim," Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, April

12, 2003

xix "Suspect Caught In Connection With Murder Of Texas Wal-Mart Clerk," NBC News Transcripts,

January 22, 2005

xx Virginia Hennessey, "Teen May Be Tried As Adult," Monterey County Herald, July 31, 2003

xxi Hil Anderson, "Notebook: Police chiefs convention in L.A," UPI, November 16, 2004

xxii "Manager Shot After Purse Snatching At Platte Wal-Mart," The Gazette (Colorado Springs), May. 23,

2005, http://www.Gazette.Com/

xxiii Dale Rodebaugh, "Ex-Durango Wal-Mart manager arrested," Durango Herald, November 10, 2005

xxiv Nancy L. Othon, "Driver Jailed In Dragging, Shoplifting; Clerk Hurt Intervening In Theft At Wal-Mart

Store," Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fl) May 21, 2003

xxv "Briefs," The News-Press (Fort Myers, Florida), June 29, 2005

xxvi Aaron Quinn, "Shooting, Shopping Land Man In Jail," The Bradenton Herald, January 22, 2003

xxvii "Witnesses Describe Terrifying Wal-Mart Shooting," WDEF-TV Channel 12 CBS, Chattanooga TN,

Dec 27, 2005

xxviii "Daily Digest," The Pantagraph (Bloomington, Illinois), January 3, 2005

xxix Vic Ryckaert, "Theft Suspect Charged With Attempted Murder; Woman Wounded By Cumberland

Policewoman Was Dragging Second Officer With Her Car, Police Say." The Indianapolis Star, September

23, 2004

xxx Mary Swerczek, "Police; 2 try to run over man; Chase drama reported outside store in Boutte," Times-

Picayune (New Orleans, LA), March 18, 2003

xxxi "Wal-Mart Stabbing, Shooting," KASA Channel 2 News, August 25, 2005http://www.Kasa.Com/

xxxii Bruce A. Scruton, "Stabbing Suspect Arrested After Possible Poisoning," The Times Union (Albany,

NY) September 10, 2003

28

xxxiii Greg Erbstoesser, "Trio Arrested In Wal-Mart Stabbing," Press & Sun-Bulletin, (Binghamton, NY)

April 1, 2003

xxxiv Jessica Foster, "Man charged in fatal attack," The Myrtle Beach Sun-News, June 3, 2005

xxxv Craig Henry, "Wal-Mart Worker Gets 40 Years For Attempted Murder," Argus Leader (Sioux Falls,

South Dakota), July 13, 2005

xxxvi "Man arrested in attempted killing," Daily Advertiser (Lafayette, LA) August 19, 2003

xxxvii "Officer shot by gunman in van upgraded to fair condition," Associated Press, June 20, 2004 and

Gretel C. Kovach, "GP officer's killer had terminal cancer Relatives shocked Navy vet would take life of

another public servant," The Dallas Morning News, June 20, 2004

xxxviii "For the Record; Public safety news; Man stabbed in head and torso in stable condition," The Salt

Lake Tribune, February 1, 2004

xxxix Holly Johnson, "Wal-Mart Failed To Screen Employee Accused Of Fondling, Suit Says," The Arizona

Republic. Jul. 27, 2005

xl Holly Johnson, "Wal-Mart Failed To Screen Employee Accused Of Fondling, Suit Says," The Arizona

Republic. Jul. 27, 2005

xli Holly Johnson, "Wal-Mart Failed To Screen Employee Accused Of Fondling, Suit Says," The Arizona

Republic. Jul. 27, 2005

xlii "Wal-Mart assault suspect arrested," Greeley Tribune (Colorado), January 28, 2006

http://www.greeleytrib.com/article/20060128/NEWS/101280068 and "Man Charged With Sexual Assaults

At Grocery Stores; Eric Gentry Charged In Three Incidents," ABC Channel 7 News, Denver, February, 1,

2006 http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/6651163/detail.html

xliii "Assault victim was nine months pregnant," Greeley Tribune (Colorado), February 8, 2006

http://www.greeleytrib.com/article/20060208/NEWS/102080086, "Wal-Mart assault suspect arrested,"

Greeley Tribune (Colorado), January 28, 2006

http://www.greeleytrib.com/article/20060128/NEWS/101280068 and "Man Charged With Sexual Assaults

At Grocery Stores; Eric Gentry Charged In Three Incidents," ABC Channel 7 News, Denver, February, 1,

2006 http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/6651163/detail.html

xliv "Indy man is charged after teen says he groped her," Indianapolis Star, February 8, 2006, "Man Accused

Of Molesting Girl At Wal-Mart," WRTV Channel 6 News Indianapolis, February 8, 2006

xlv "No bail for man accused of assaulting minor," Sentinel & Enterprise (Fitchburg, MA), January 24,

2006, J.J. Huggins, "Alleged Wal-Mart fondler returns to court," Fitchburg Sentinel and Enterprise,

(Massachusetts) January 31, 2006, http://www.sentinelandenterprise.com/local/ci_3461536

xlvi John Vandiver, "Man charged with Wal-Mart sex assault," Asbury Park Press (New Jersey), July 29,

2005

xlvii "Police Say Woman Raped In Wal-Mart Parking Lot," Morning Call (Allentown, Pennsylvania) March

9, 2005

xlviii Rick Brundrett, "Lawyer Wants Sex Offender Numbers Known; Motion Seeks To Find Out How Many

Work At Wal-Marts In S.C." The Charlotte Observer (North Carolina), December 19, 2004

xlix "Sexual Assault Reported In Aberdeen," Aberdeen American News (South Dakota), August 30, 2004

l Robert Wilson, "Police want to talk to man about assault," Knoxville News-Sentinel (Tennessee) February

17, 2004

li "Woman, 27, Reports Sexual Assault In Or Wal-Mart," Knoxville News-Sentinel (Tennessee) July 6,

2005

lii "Wal-Mart Employee Charged With Sex Assault; Boy Reported He Was Attacked In A Store Restroom,"

The Houston Chronicle, August 06, 2005

liii Mark Havnes, "Rapist Gets Five Years To Life After Plea Deal," The Salt Lake Tribune, February 24,

2004

liv "Wal-Mart Suspect Guilty Of Assault," The Post-Crescent (Appleton, WI) January 24, 2004

lv J.D. Gallop, "Police Hope Autopsy Yields Clues," Florida Today (Brevard County, Fl) February 9, 2004

lvi Chereen Langrill, "Tips Sought In Kidnapping/Rape Case In Mountain Home," The Idaho Statesman,

July 3, 2003

lvii Norman Miller, "Cops say woman, son held by rapist for two days," Boston Herald, December 21, 2005,

http://news.bostonherald.com/, Raja Mishra and John R. Ellement, "Woman allegedly raped in front of

son," Boston Globe, December 21, 2005 http://www.boston.com/

29

lviii "Suspect Caught In Connection With Murder Of Texas Wal-Mart Clerk," NBC News Transcripts,

January 22, 2005

lix Holly Johnson, "Wal-Mart Failed To Screen Employee Accused Of Fondling, Suit Says," The Arizona

Republic. Jul. 27, 2005

lx Holly Johnson, "Wal-Mart Failed To Screen Employee Accused Of Fondling, Suit Says," The Arizona

Republic. Jul. 27, 2005

lxi Holly Johnson, "Wal-Mart Failed To Screen Employee Accused Of Fondling, Suit Says," The Arizona

Republic. Jul. 27, 2005

lxii "Indy man is charged after teen says he groped her," Indianapolis Star, February 8, 2006, "Man Accused

Of Molesting Girl At Wal-Mart," WRTV Channel 6 News Indianapolis, February 8, 2006

lxiii "No bail for man accused of assaulting minor," Sentinel & Enterprise (Fitchburg, MA), January 24,

2006, J.J. Huggins, "Alleged Wal-Mart fondler returns to court," Fitchburg Sentinel and Enterprise,

(Massachusetts) January 31, 2006, http://www.sentinelandenterprise.com/local/ci_3461536

lxiv John Vandiver, "Man charged with Wal-Mart sex assault," Asbury Park Press (New Jersey), July 29,

2005

lxv Rick Brundrett, "Lawyer Wants Sex Offender Numbers Known; Motion Seeks To Find Out How Many

Work At Wal-Marts In S.C." The Charlotte Observer (North Carolina), December 19, 2004

lxvi "Sexual Assault Reported In Aberdeen," Aberdeen American News (South Dakota), August 30, 2004

lxvii Robert Wilson, "Police want to talk to man about assault," Knoxville News-Sentinel (Tennessee)

February 17, 2004

lxviii "Wal-Mart Employee Charged With Sex Assault; Boy Reported He Was Attacked In A Store

Restroom," The Houston Chronicle, August 06, 2005

lxix "Wal-Mart Suspect Guilty Of Assault," The Post-Crescent (Appleton, WI) January 24, 2004

lxx Pam Ramsey, "Man Accused Of Assaulting Girls In Stores Faces Federal Charges," The Associated

Press, July 26, 2003

lxxi Josh Noel, "Man Sought In Serial Killings: Investigators More Hopeful After Reports," State-

Times/Morning Advocate (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), May 24, 2003

lxxii Tonya Jameson, "Arrests Made In Wal-Mart Attacks; Both Men Face Charges Of Common Law

Robbery And Attempted Rape," Charlotte Observer (North Carolina) April 24, 2003

================================

RE: The Poster Says:
I am interested in consumer related issues, and consumer protection. This particularly applies to Target stores which have the absolutely WORST return policy of ANY retail store and whose customer nonservice desk has a 'nose in the air policy' towards customers. This chain does NOT deserve to be patronized by consumers.
========================================



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